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Some Special Interests => Occupation Interests => Topic started by: PrueM on Saturday 29 October 05 11:28 BST (UK)

Title: What was a hallier?
Post by: PrueM on Saturday 29 October 05 11:28 BST (UK)
My husband's g-g-grandfather Thomas GOODE lived in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire and in the 1851 census is shown as a "Hallier".  In 1861 he was a nailer which I presume was either a nail maker, or more likely someone who worked on the machinery in the fabric mills in that area.

I haven't heard of a Hallier before and wondered whether anyone knew what it is/was?

Thanks - image of census page attached.

Prue  :)
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: dennford on Saturday 29 October 05 11:33 BST (UK)
What do you reckon is the second word?
                                        Denn
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: 'Tricia on Saturday 29 October 05 11:41 BST (UK)
Lab for Labourer

Tricia
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: hlbradd on Saturday 29 October 05 11:43 BST (UK)
Could it be haulier misspelt (but pronounced hall'eeah?) ???

Helen
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: 'Tricia on Saturday 29 October 05 11:46 BST (UK)
Nearest I can find ???

Hillier -- Roof tiler

Don't seem to list Haulier on old occupations sites ???

Tricia ???
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: Hackstaple on Saturday 29 October 05 11:59 BST (UK)
This is a perpetual query on family history sites. Hallier is not a misprint nor is it misspelt. Hallier [not Haulier] was the name given to those who actually hauled the coal from the seam face to the lift collection area. I have seen it is connection with iron mining as well. It is much more often found in Monmouthshire than elsewhere.
A Haulier would be a carter, often in business for own acoount.  8)
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: PrueM on Saturday 29 October 05 12:15 BST (UK)
Ooh, brilliant - thanks everyone, and especially hackstaple  :)
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: StHallier on Thursday 01 December 05 08:54 GMT (UK)
Hi Prue and everyone - I am new to the forum.  My maiden name is Hallier, and I always thought the origins were French because the word hallier in the French dictionary means a small wood, copse or thicket...

I don't know though and would love some input if anyone knows any more about the name. I am trying to trace its origins, so far I have seen it mentioned as far back at 1730.
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: Jane Swan on Thursday 01 December 05 18:17 GMT (UK)
Hi StHallier

Welcome to Rootschat

Jane
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: Jane Swan on Thursday 01 December 05 18:21 GMT (UK)
Hi Prue

According to Colin Waters book A dictionary of old trades, titles and occupations a hallier is a wild bird catcher who caught birds alive ie not a hunter

Jane
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: PrueM on Thursday 01 December 05 19:57 GMT (UK)
Hi Jane,
Gosh!  That's thrown the cat among the pigeons (no pun intended)!  How interesting...talk about a career change, from bird catcher to factory worker within 10 years!
Prue

P.S.  Welcome, StHallier!  Afraid I can't help with your family name search, but I wish you good luck.  You could try posting your enquiry in a new topic, it might attract more readers.  :)
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: Jane Swan on Friday 02 December 05 07:47 GMT (UK)
Hi Prue

As it was so different I double and triple checked the entry and that is what it says. though why you would want to catch live birds in Bromsgrove I can't imagine. May be they stayed fresher until you ate them!
A hallier maker-a manufacturer of a special kind of net for catching wild birds.

The nailer surprisingly is defined as your 2nd option:
Nailer- same as card nailer. Rarely one who uses nails for construction.
Card nailer- Machine maintenance worker in a cloth mill (often self employed).

But interestingly remembering the accuracy of spelling on census data:
Nailor - nail maker.

Jane
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: behindthefrogs on Friday 09 December 05 20:17 GMT (UK)
Nailer, meaning a maker of nails is usually in the census spelt with an "e".

I have a number of ancestors from Halesowen who were nailers and nail factors all involved in the process of producing nails.  These were made at home where it was a poorly paid piece rate industry.  It was the main industry in that area of the midlands and Bromsgrove is almost the next parish.

I am voting for nailer.

David
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: Hackstaple on Friday 09 December 05 22:10 GMT (UK)
The topic was what is a "hallier". The nailer is another entry on the same page. I see it as spelt with an "e" and not with an "o" in any case.
It is almost impossible that the person who wrote down the census page used hallier and nailer or nailor as alternative spellings of the same job. The word "hallier" is clear for all to see. I am not claiming that my interpretation is the only possible one but a hallier is not a nailer of any kind. 8)
But back to Jane who asks why someone would want to catch live birds in Bromsgrove - you cannot catch dead ones!  ;D
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: Jane Swan on Saturday 10 December 05 07:05 GMT (UK)
Hi Hack

But back to Jane who asks why someone would want to catch live birds in Bromsgrove - you cannot catch dead ones!

Too true, I take your point!

Jane
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: crowkie on Wednesday 18 January 17 15:31 GMT (UK)
I have a relative in 1841 called 'Haughliers.' Crazy spelling of Hauliers or what?
Title: Re: What was a hallier?
Post by: robbo43 on Monday 20 March 17 23:07 GMT (UK)
As an outside possibility a hallier might be someone who man-hauled boats on rivers of canals.