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General => The Common Room => Topic started by: Trees on Tuesday 06 February 18 09:48 GMT (UK)

Title: workhouse apprentices
Post by: Trees on Tuesday 06 February 18 09:48 GMT (UK)
How would a workhouse child sent out in an apprenticeship be recorded on censuses?
Would he have been part of a household or is it possible he did not "sleep" in the house of the butty collier he was assigned to?

I have a person who I suspect he was the son of a man who died of cholera in 1849 and a mother who died  giving birth to a son 8 months after the father's death. An older sister and the newborn were taken in by an uncle and aunt and this chap turns up as their son in 1871.
Peter Higginbotham mentions some workhouse boys were apprenticed in this way until their 21st birthday that would mean William being released from apprenticeship in 1868 as a trained miner he suddenly appeared with Benjamin in 1871 as a miner aged 25. So if this is the case why isn't he on censuses was he on nights and not "sleeping" in the house so not recorded or was he not accommodated in a house?
Title: Re: workhouse apprentices
Post by: stanmapstone on Tuesday 06 February 18 09:57 GMT (UK)
The census was intended to record everyone in the country on census night, wherever they were. The enumerator was instructed to note people sleeping in barns, sheds, tents or the open air. Also the police helped enumerate those vagrants sleeping under bridges and in sheds etc.

Stan
Title: Re: workhouse apprentices
Post by: mowsehowse on Tuesday 06 February 18 10:05 GMT (UK)
Frustrating ain't it!! :(
I find the same with Mariners, and am forced to conclude they were at sea on census night.

Have you seen the apprenticeship document, or searched the rate books, so you definitely know the name of the Master? 

You may well be correct in assuming he was at work when the enumerator called...... are the mines listed on the census?
Title: Re: workhouse apprentices
Post by: Trees on Tuesday 06 February 18 10:38 GMT (UK)
Sadly the only thing I have about him is the 1871 census he just appears and disappears back into oblivion  He appears as son of Benjamin and Sarah FLAVELL but a son and daughter of this couple that appeared on the 1851 census were definitely the children of Benjamin's brother, Edmund and Sarah's sister Mary both of whom had died before the 1851 census. This "son" was born between the daughter and a further daughter who had been buried with her father in 1849. So I think he was one of Edmund's children not Benjamin's
I am trying to find where he was between 1835 and 1871.
Thanks for clearing that up Stan
Title: Re: workhouse apprentices
Post by: stanmapstone on Tuesday 06 February 18 10:53 GMT (UK)

You may well be correct in assuming he was at work when the enumerator called...... are the mines listed on the census?

The instructions to the enumerator were that no person present on census night were to be omitted, and no person absent included. If individuals were working that night, or were travelling, they would be enumerated in the house to which they would normally return on the morning after they had finished their shift, or where they were to stay at the next stop on their journey. From 1851 onwards night workers were to be enumerated in their homes if they returned there the next day. No census schedules were issued to factories or mines.

Stan
Title: Re: workhouse apprentices
Post by: Trees on Tuesday 06 February 18 11:01 GMT (UK)
So was anyone for example a workhouse inmate registered simply by initials or admission number? I am clutching at straws as to where he was pre 1871
Title: Re: workhouse apprentices
Post by: mowsehowse on Tuesday 06 February 18 11:09 GMT (UK)
So was anyone for example a workhouse inmate registered simply by initials or admission number? I am clutching at straws as to where he was pre 1871

I believe I have seen returns without full names for assylums and work houses, but I wouldn't take an oath on it.  :-\
Title: Re: workhouse apprentices
Post by: stanmapstone on Tuesday 06 February 18 11:28 GMT (UK)
It was only in the 1861 Census that the enumerator need only return the initials  of inmates, patients, prisoners, paupers in institutions although some were shown by initials in later censuses. People in Asylums are usually only shown by initials.

Stan