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Messages - John915

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1
Good evening,

I would say possibly post war but before they changed to pneumatic tyres. The corporal has no medal ribbons but he and the man in front of him are wearing collar badges, not worn during the war.

Apart from the corporal who obviously doesn't want to get his hands dirty they are wearing fatigues. This is the working dress used instead of getting your battledress dirty. It will be the gun crew not defaulters, every crew would be responsible for their own guns upkeep.

I think also this is a territorial unit rather than regulars, the corporal appears to have a "T" above his shoulder title.

The end of the barrel will be polished steel rather than brass, another indicator that this is post war. Bonding brass to the end of the barrel is something iv'e never seen on a gun, it would have a tendancy to loosen in use.

John915

2
Armed Forces / Re: Army uniform identification
« on: Tuesday 15 May 18 20:58 BST (UK)  »
Good evening,

We had a laundry as well but not much use for socks and collars for instance. We were issued with 3 prs socks so had to wash them ourselves and dry overnight.

Only 2 shirts SD with collars so if wearing daily they had to be washed, pressed and starched overnight.

But 3 shirts KF so you could send 1 to the laundry and keep 2 on rotation to wear.

Army issue clothing was sadly lacking in quantity, never enough of any one thing to keep you going all week and send stuff to the laundry. OK out in the far east were you got it back next day. But in UK and BAOR it was weekly.

John915

3
Armed Forces / Re: Army uniform identification
« on: Monday 14 May 18 22:18 BST (UK)  »
Good evening,

You can see the two collar ends under the tie and just a small portion of the front stud. He had obviously run out of starch, or couldn't be bothered to mix some to put the collar in.

Easier in my day, came in spray cans.

John915

4
Occupation Interests / Re: Wood Turner.
« on: Tuesday 01 May 18 17:06 BST (UK)  »
Good afternoon,

He would have worked in a turning shop or even at home depending on the era. Woodturning was a seperate industry from carpentry and joinery.

They made a whole range of household goods, from spoons to bowls and plates. Others, including bodgers, made chair parts. Bodgers worked with green wood out in the woods.

John915

5
Technical Help / Re: Old hard drives
« on: Monday 30 April 18 16:16 BST (UK)  »
Good afternoon,

Added, memory cards are a much better way to store info of your computer these days rather than an external hard drive.

Can you clarify what you mean by this? Memory cards and flash drives are just as susceptible to fires, floods, falling down a drain/back of the sofa and theft as external hard drives. I've yet to see an external hard drive being eaten by a dog.

Also compare the cost of a 1TB external hard drive with a 1TB SD card.

For transferring info from one machine to another, yes SD cards or flash drives are fine, but I wouldn't rely solely on one method for long-term backup.

Memory cards are easily stored in a case which will hold many cards, my grandsons holds 60. Personally I don't sit on the kerb, the kitchin worktop or the sofa when using the computer. So unlikely to lose a card down any of them, no dog either.

As to prices, a good external hard drive could cost between 30 and in excess of 100. Memory cards cost between 5 and 50, couldn't find a 1tb, largest was 128gb. But all in all cards would be cheaper, are just as good for storage if looked after and are much easier to transport if you travel for research purposes.

As far as using old internal hard drives as external storage goes, I wouldn't. Once out of the computer all the ones iv'e dealt with are bare metal cases. I doubt they are double insulated so an electrical risk is present. You could wrap it in tape but then risk overheating. Lastly, most parts in computers are connected with single line connections which the part is pushed onto. External leads have the requisite number of terminals in a block formation not a single line ie usb connecters or similar. Just waiting for an answer from SiL as this is his line of work. Building, installing and aftercare of computer systems for the scientific industry.

John915

6
Armed Forces / Re: Who is this - what uniform?
« on: Sunday 29 April 18 18:05 BST (UK)  »
Good afternoon,

The uniform is basically a copy of a British hussars uniform. The Canadian militia cavalry all used the British 13th hussars uniform as a pattern. They had run a training school in Canada between 1866 and 1869 to give the militia formal cavalry training.

The Canadian army at that time was nearly all part time, they still had only about 3000 full time troops when ww1 broke out.

There were 2 permanent units at the time in question and 36 militia cavalry. Of these 11 were hussars, some were named some only numbered. The following are the numbers of the hussars, 1, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 17, 21 and 33.

Those in the know will instantly recognise the numbering as being almost identical to the British light cavalry regts. Only the 1st, 6th, 17th, 21st and 33rd are not hussars in the British army. We had no 33rd, 1st and 6th were dragoons and 17th and 21st were lancers.

So no way of telling from the photo which Canadian regt they are.

John915

7
Technical Help / Re: Old hard drives
« on: Sunday 29 April 18 17:33 BST (UK)  »
Good afternoon,

I agree with TY and Stan, for security purposes.

I would suggest buying a memory card, 64 gb to make sure you have enough space. Download everything you need from old computor. Everything else you can delete and do a factory reset if you have the option.

Once done remove the hard drive and smash it, a large hammer and path usually does it. Then just take the whole computor to your local tip for recycling.

John915

Added, memory cards are a much better way to store info of your computor these days rather than an external hard drive. Store them in a case and pop them in the slot when needed.

8
World War One / Re: Medal of Company Sergeant Major in Queen's Royal Regiment
« on: Tuesday 24 April 18 21:58 BST (UK)  »
Back again,

A little further research shows him on pinterest labeled as "RSM" GGuards. It seems all guards WO1 wore that insignia not just GSM.

John915

9
World War One / Re: Medal of Company Sergeant Major in Queen's Royal Regiment
« on: Tuesday 24 April 18 21:05 BST (UK)  »
Good evening,

Just as a point of interest, the man in the photo on the facebook link is not the same man as the original photo.

The original shows a sgt with the MM.

The facebook image shows a Garrison Sgt Maj in the Grenadier Guards, with no MM. Only GSM carries that much "bird s***" on his arm, mostly seen with 4 chevrons behind the main badge.

John915

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