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Messages - horselydown86

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 188
1
You need to post bigger extracts, Dave.

...Alys my

wyffe & [phylyppe?] Ley my sonne my executors / I desier Thomas Ley my sonne &

John [flechar?] my sonne in Lawe to be sup(er)visors Theys wetnyssys will(ia)m [Colvin?] the

vic(ar) of [Thorntun? / Thorntam?] Thomas Ley of Thorntun Ric(hard) fyscher & John [pykard?]

2
These are actually the overseers.  I suspect the executors are just before this.

                                   ...and I con=

stitute and appoynte Thomas Sydowne

Henrie Leye my brother And John

Ley of Bagworthe to be the overseers

of this my laste wyll to be fullie satisfied

and p(er)furmed...

3
That lower case "L" after the P of Ptends: is that some shorthand for "something has been omitted - but you can guess what it is" !!

While it looks like a lower-case l here, it's actually a superscript squiggle, which is a standard contraction representing the letters re; and usually but not always seen after p.

I will see if I can find a clearer example and post a clip.

ADDED:

See the images attached to the first post here:

https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=798508.msg6557473#msg6557473

4
Second image:

...Dower Thirds and widows Bench which she may

have claime or p(re)tend to have any right or Title unto...


See:

http://www.rootschat.com/links/01n5r/


ADDED:

The use of touching is very common in phrases used to introduce the worldly estate part of wills.

It's a figurative sense of the word, still used today - we talk about touching on a subject.

5
Handwriting Deciphering & Recognition / Re: An inventory
« on: Tuesday 11 December 18 17:03 GMT (UK)  »
Any thoughts about catch press and catch horse?

I haven't seen either term before, and internet searches haven't been productive.

However, should I ever need to catch a real horse in a field, I already know that YouTube has my back.

6
Handwriting Deciphering & Recognition / Re: An inventory
« on: Tuesday 11 December 18 15:08 GMT (UK)  »
D. What would a Bep be?

I presume he means a Bed, although I can't be certain.  I was following the principle of transcribing what is written; and it clearly isn't written with a d.

I agree with the word Catch, as you have highlighted in Reply #5, but I haven't encountered these terms before.


7
Handwriting Deciphering & Recognition / Re: An inventory
« on: Tuesday 11 December 18 05:11 GMT (UK)  »
A few suggestions from a quick look through:

02.  ...five Chests and one Bep and Linnen

07.  ...two high Chest and Drawers...

08.  I believe the word used here (and elsewhere) is Stallages.  Search stillage on the internet.

09.  I don't think it is Stove Grates.  Either Stow or (less likely) Stew.

12.  ...One Clock...

13.  ...one Spit etc

16.  ...one Skellet...

18.  ...Small Hows...  [= hoes]

8
Handwriting Deciphering & Recognition / Re: 1708 Latin burial extract 12
« on: Monday 10 December 18 15:08 GMT (UK)  »
I make it:  Lanifica

The Latin dictionaries give the definition as (adjective):  woodworking, spinning, weaving

9
Handwriting Deciphering & Recognition / Re: Help with name
« on: Sunday 09 December 18 18:27 GMT (UK)  »
doesn't seem to use 'the' at all

I'm of the opinion that your record has been scrubbed out and rewritten.

There's an orphaned part of a loop just below the o in sonn on the line above.  It's the kind of loop that might form part of an h, k, l or long-s.  Also, the surface of the page has an abraded look under the start of your record.

That could account for a change in the writer's usual habits.

Note that I'm not saying it must be the - just that it's a possibility.

Breaking it down, of the whole series of letters before the start of sonn, the second last is an h and the last is probably a scrubby e.

The third-last position really has to be a t, since i doesn't precede h in English.

So it's either a long name ending with the or it's the word the.

ADDED:

See also that the bottom loop of the long-s of sonn in the record above just disappears at the edge of the abraded area.  Compare to the other instances of sonn.

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