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Messages - eadaoin

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1
Does anyone know about the current progress of the release of 1926 Census?

2
Wexford / Re: IS THE NAME CISS OR CISSIE A REAL NAME
« on: Friday 05 October 18 17:49 BST (UK)  »
Ciss is often a pet name for a girl in a family of boys = "sister"

3
The Lighter Side / Re: What has Rootschat done for you?
« on: Monday 01 October 18 12:34 BST (UK)  »
I've been a Rootschatter for ten years now. I think i Googled something and came across it by chance.
I know I was an "onlooker" for a while before I tried a post - trying to figure out how the site worked.

Most of my family are in Ireland and I live in Dublin, so I was used to going to the various archives in person for 10 or 12 years.
I'd done a little in London and Belfast, but it was wonderful to meet people online who could help with my various relatives who'd gone to USA, Canada, Australia, etc. In addition people who knew more about UK Archives, War records etc.

I've been able to help a little, but nothing like the amount of help I've received.

4
The Common Room / Re: Catholic Church in Kiltiernan, Co. Dublin, Ireland in 1908?
« on: Sunday 16 September 18 10:30 BST (UK)  »
The Catholic Directory says that Kilternan church was part of Sandyford Parish and was blessed in 1929. Very pretty little church.

Thanks for your reply.  I now wonder where the Catholics that lived there had their children baptized?  Also, I wonder why the GRO donít have the marriage record for them...itís puzzling.

It isn't a parish church, it was part of Sandyford parish. There was a church in Glencullen (dating from 1830s, I think), which might have been used by by people at that end of the parish - but I think the records would have been kept in Sandyford anyway.

5
The Common Room / Re: Catholic Church in Kiltiernan, Co. Dublin, Ireland in 1908?
« on: Saturday 15 September 18 23:51 BST (UK)  »
The Catholic Directory says that Kilternan church was part of Sandyford Parish and was blessed in 1929. Very pretty little church.

6
Ireland / Re: Catholic Priest records
« on: Sunday 02 September 18 22:40 BST (UK)  »
Thoms Directory 1922 has an Ecclesiastical Directory - includes Catholic priests.

But - I don't know how much further back this went . .

7
Ireland / Re: Police Guard?
« on: Friday 10 August 18 19:50 BST (UK)  »
Thomas Gray was in the R.I.C. (Royal Irish Constabulary).
When he left he went to Montserrat to the Police Force there.
This was in the late 1890s (can't look just now!)

His R.I.C. record says that he resigned in 1899.
In the column "observations" , the record says "Appt Sergt Major in the Leeward Islands Police"
Incidentally, he decided to go - he wasn't "sent".
After Montserrat, he went to Kenya to work in the Prison Service.

Have you checked William's R.I.C. records - the records are fascinating, giving some marriage details, postings etc.
Of course William could have been in Dublin City, which had its own Police Forsc - the D.M.P. (Dublin Metropolitan Police). I think the records may be fairly similar.

8
The Common Room / Re: Same couple married each other twice within 18 months
« on: Friday 10 August 18 19:41 BST (UK)  »
The only instance I have found in my family of the same people marrying twice were when the groom was in the forces so presumably had married 'without permission'

Great-uncle Tom married his wife twice - a year apart. He was a policeman in the R.I.C. and married the first time after 6 years service (they weren't supposed to marry until they had 7 years service) . . maybe there was a baby on the way, though I've never found a birth corresponding.

9
The Common Room / Re: Marrying a cousin
« on: Monday 30 July 18 15:28 BST (UK)  »
Also, when cousins marry, there's a higher chance of recessive gene problems in the offspring.

OH has haemochromatosis, which means that he doesn't get rid of excess iron - for most versions of this it's caused by the sufferer receiving a faulty gene from both parents. If the parents are closely related, it's somewhat more likely that both may be carriers of the same recessive genes.

Because of OH's haemochromatosis, all our children are carriers of the gene, though none are sufferers. If one of them married a carrier, statistically one quarter of their children would be sufferers. It's a fairly common gene in Ireland anyway.
(no first cousins involved - OH is an "only")

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