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Messages - Elwyn Soutter

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 273
1
Armagh / Re: death details
« on: Yesterday at 08:06 »

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Because of where I am getting a cert. is costly hence the hope someone here might have privy to info really close to what I am looking for that might give me a little thread to run with as credits are costly if you dont get the info you want straight away.

Popsit
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It doesnít really matter where you live. For events in Northern Ireland that are not yet free on the irishgenealogy site, you can view the original certificates on-line for £2.50 a time, on the GRONI site. Thatís not very expensive, and is the same price for you as we pay in Ireland.

2
Antrim / Re: Antrim Castle
« on: Sunday 12 August 18 23:16 BST (UK)  »
The Skeffingtons have commemorative plaques in Antrim town Church of Ireland.  Not certain whether they are buried in the church or in the adjacent graveyard, but that was their family church.

3
Derry (Londonderry) / Re: McCombe Nodwell from Magherafelt
« on: Sunday 05 August 18 07:35 BST (UK)  »
Hi Elwyn. 

 Can I ask if Alexander is also buried at Tamlagh Parish Church.

Furthermore I understand Robert also had a daughter called Winifred, do you know when she was as born?


I donít know if Alexander is buried in Tamlaght graveyard. Thereís a transcript of the legible graves in Tamlaght Lower on this site. Thereís no McComb listed but he might have been buried in an unmarked grave, or the stone may not be legible now.

http://www.oneirishrover.com/tamlaght-graveyard/

There are quite a few other graveyards in the area. Not all have been transcribed and not all are on-line. You may just need to go round them all and search.

Winifredís birth was presumably in the 1930s or later. Births in Northern Ireland within the past 100 years are not generally available on-line. They are open to the public but just not on-line. There are 2 places with on-line access: PRONI & GRONI (both in Belfast). If you, or a researcher, can get there in person you can search for her birth there. Otherwise you would need to contact GRONI (by e-mail or by phone) and ask them to search for you. There may be a search fee in addition to the cost of the birth certificate. Contact details for ringing or e-mailing GRONI:

https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/contacts/contacts-az/general-register-office-northern-ireland

I think Gaffy & Aghadowey have already answered your other points.


4
Antrim / Re: Robert George Black and Eliza Black - Antrim/Belfast
« on: Thursday 26 July 18 21:08 BST (UK)  »

I was able to locate him in Scotland. He was born in 1883 to William John Marshall and Mary Ann Black in Govan, Glasgow. It also very helpfully has their marriage date: October 3rd 1880 in Belfast. I just need to locate that record and I am in business!

Canít see any marriage in Belfast between William Marshall and Mary Black on 3.10.1880. However I do see one for William John Marshall and Margaret Black alias Black on 10.10.1881. (She was a widow, and evidently her maiden name was also Black).

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/images/marriage_returns/marriages_1881/11015/8027554.pdf

5
Antrim / Re: baptisms for Belfast
« on: Thursday 26 July 18 20:09 BST (UK)  »
Statutory birth registration didnít start in Ireland till 1864 so you wonít get a birth certificate for him.

The RC parish records are on-line free on the National Library site:

https://www.nli.ie/en/family-history-introduction.aspx

If you think he may have been Presbyterian, then some Presbyterian baptism records are on sites such as rootsireland and the Ulster Historical Foundation but many are not on-line at all.  Altogether there are about 50 Presbyterian churches in Belfast, though as I mentioned not all have records for the 1840s. It would really just be a matter of plodding though them all at PRONI. (They are mostly on microfilm). Don't expect too much if you find it. All you normally get, especially in Belfast, are the date & the parents names. But you might find some siblings in the same set of records.

Researchers in the PRONI area: http://sgni.net

6
Antrim / Re: baptisms for Belfast
« on: Wednesday 25 July 18 22:17 BST (UK)  »
The short answer is PRONI (the public record office) in Belfast.

You havenít said what denomination you are researching. Most RC records are on-line but for other denominations many are not. However there are copies of most of the surviving church records in PRONI.  If you donít know the denomination then you could be looking at 100 churches. If you know the denomination then that will narrow it a bit. A personal visit is required to search them (or get a researcher to do it for you). Not all the Belfast church records from that period have survived. Some were lost due to German bombing in WW2.

7
Would Ballindrait Presbyterian Church hold records of deaths before 1864.

No. As a general rule Presbyterians donít keep burial records, and looking at the PRONI guide, none are mentioned for Ballindrait. Unless there is a gravestone, or a mention in a local paper, there may be no record of a pre 1864 death at all.

Ballindrait Presbyterian has the following early records (copies held at PRONI):

Baptisms, 1819-61 and 1873-1923; marriages, 1827-8 and 1845-1901.

8

   I cant locate either of the parents or childrens death certificates. 


Bear in mind death registration only started in Ireland in 1864. If any of the family died before that, thereís no death certificate to find.

9
Derry (Londonderry) / Re: McCombe Nodwell from Magherafelt
« on: Thursday 12 July 18 22:46 BST (UK)  »
I looked in the Muster Rolls for Co Derry (c 1630) and I donít see either McComb or Burnside listed. That suggests they arrived after that time.

Burnside is a Scottish name and  McComb is generally only found in the counties of Ulster. It too appears to be Scottish in origins.

https://www.johngrenham.com/surnames/

There were several waves of settlers from Scotland in the 1600s. Some came 1610 onwards as part of the Plantation; others arrived in the 1640s when General Monroís 10,000 strong Scottish army disbanded in Carrickfergus and many decided to stay. Another big wave arrived in the 1690s due to famine in Scotland.  By the 1720s, the Scots were starting to leave Ireland, and so Iíd say your families probably arrived in Ireland sometime in the 1600s, though not necessarily as part of the original plantation.

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