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Messages - AntonyMMM

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1
"Causing the body to be buried (or cremated) " is one of last qualifications on the informant qualification list that allows someone to register a death - it means exactly what it says i.e. the person dealing with the funeral arrangements, but GRO rules specifically state that it should not be a funeral director. What you can be fairly certain of is that the person is not a relative, otherwise that would be their qualification and stated as such.

These days it is often used for co-habiting couples,when the survivor wasn't present at the death  (as they are not legally regarded as a relative).

"After post mortem without inquest", means no doctor was able to give a cause of death so the coroner orders a post mortem examination  to determine one (if possible). The vast majority of cases referred to the coroner never lead to an inquest - inquests are to look into the circumstances that lead to a death, not the medical cause.

2
Family History Beginners Board / Re: Typewritten Marriage Certificate - 1871
« on: Friday 23 February 18 17:03 GMT (UK)  »
Certificates are sometimes typewritten for all sorts of reasons - may depend on when the information was last  copied (or re-copied),  and when the certificate was produced.

Unusual, but not that rare. I have quite few.


3
Family History Beginners Board / Re: Typewritten Marriage Certificate - 1871
« on: Friday 23 February 18 16:43 GMT (UK)  »
Certificates are just copies of information held in a register, they are not an original document - the register entry from 1871 will be handwritten (as marriages still are). 


4
The Common Room / Re: Martha's cause(s) of death 1917
« on: Tuesday 13 February 18 11:34 GMT (UK)  »
Carol

So you would read it as Ia being the actual cause of death, with Ib being the condition that led to 1a.  The three other conditions listed at II being present and maybe contributory, but not a direct cause.

Antony

5
The Common Room / Re: Martha's cause(s) of death 1917
« on: Tuesday 13 February 18 09:54 GMT (UK)  »
That would be dependent on the knowledge of the doctor who completed the death note in 1917, though.
My experience tells me not to trust medics  :)

True - but the numbering rules are designed to show the causal links and reflect what the doctor stated at the time - whether they were right or not is another matter.

As a registrar it is quite common to have to phone the doctor to discuss issues with what they have given as the causes, or how they have numbered them. Sometimes the doctor will happily admit that the cause they have written reflects their "best guess".

6
The Common Room / Re: Martha's cause(s) of death 1917
« on: Tuesday 13 February 18 08:58 GMT (UK)  »
If they are numbered as 1 & 2 on the certificate then there was no causal link.

Conditions listed under 1 on a death entry are the actual cause of death and any conditions listed as 2 (or II) are other medical conditions present which may be contributory but not directly related to the cause of death.

If the dermatitis had led to the nephritis they should be numbered as:

(1a) Interstitial nephritis
(1b) Exfoliative dermatitis



7
Ainsworth is a very common name in the Blackburn area - I have some in my own family, most (but not all) of whom were Catholic, so look at the records of the RC churches in the area (from late 1700s onwards). If they were RC, then you may not find records of baptisms much earlier than that.

8
The Common Room / Re: Change to birth certificate - reasons? Please help
« on: Wednesday 07 February 18 12:03 GMT (UK)  »
So if, as it seems, Joseph was the informant at the registration of Lilian Lavinia's birth, he was doing something he had probably never done before.  If he had  not expected the question, "Your wife's maiden name?" he might easily have answered with the truth before realising why that was the wrong answer in this situation.

Without seeing the certificate, we don't know who the informant was, whether a father is even named (he probably is, but there are scenarios that would generate the same index entry without) , or what they said. There are a number of scenarios that would fit - from simple mistake or misunderstanding through to fraud/perjury.

9
The Common Room / Re: Change to birth certificate - reasons? Please help
« on: Wednesday 07 February 18 08:14 GMT (UK)  »
What you have is a first entry in Jun 1947 as McIntyre, with a mothers maiden name of Campbell. This has then been corrected to be Morton/Ranaldi. From the index alone, you can't be certain whether a father is named  (if he is they are claiming to be married).

In Jun 1948 the birth is re-registered. This time it is clear that it is to an unmarried couple, and the father's details will be on there.

Comparing both certificates will be interesting - the details/reasons for the correction in 1947 particularly. There may be marginal notes on both entries.


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