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Messages - Gillg

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 ... 266
19
Lancashire / Re: Daniel Bolton at Knott Booth farm
« on: Saturday 08 June 19 15:53 BST (UK)  »
Yes, Millipede, that's more like it.  The transcription on Family Search was obviously very wrong in giving Daniel's age as 4 in 1861!  Daniel's death is registered in Rochdale in Sep Q 1910, age 67.  He may have relished the fresh air at Knott Booth, but the farm work would have been just as hard as factory work, even with the help of his son.  And where did he get the money from to take on a farm tenancy, I wonder?

Incidentally, all Daniel's children worked in mills from the age of 10 and most of them, my grandmother included, died young of respiratory illnesses, even James, born 1870, who apparently helped him on the farm later.

On his daughter's marriage certificate from 1896 Daniel's occupation is also given as farmer.

20
Lancashire / Daniel Bolton at Knott Booth farm
« on: Saturday 08 June 19 15:31 BST (UK)  »
My great-grandfather, Daniel Bolton, was born in Yorkshire in 1843 and later moved with his parents James and Grace to the Rochdale area.

Census returns show him thus:
1851 age 8 with parents in Soyland, W. Yorkshire
1861 in Rochdale with parents.  There is an odd entry shown on Family Search  RG09/3050/65 which gives father as "Jones", not James, and Daniel age 4!  He should be 18 and is nevertheless described as a Cotton Worker.  Can anyone view the entry page?
1871 millworker age 28 with wife and family in Newhey/Butterworth area of Rochdale
1881 millworker age 38 with wife Betty and family in Newhey
1891 millworker age 48 in Crompton area with family
1901 farmer age 58 at Knott Booth, Burnedge with son James, farmer's son

in 1896 his daughter married and his address then was also Knott Booth farm. I am wondering what kind of circumstances would lead a millworker to become a farmer, as I consider it to be a profession which is handed down from father to son in the main.  His wife's family were also millworkers.

Knott Booth Farm still exists and is a Grade 2 listed building with mullioned windows and other attractive sounding features.  I have found records of farmer William Witham (no relative) living there in 1879.

Any ideas where I could look to see exactly when beteen 1891 and 1896 he moved to Knott Booth and how he came to be a farmer?  He died in 1910.

21
Lancashire / Daniel Bolton of Knott Booth Farm, Burnedge
« on: Saturday 08 June 19 15:21 BST (UK)  »
My great-grandfather, Daniel Bolton, was born in Yorkshire in 1843 and later moved with his parents James and Grace to the Rochdale area.

Census returns show him thus:
1851 age 8 with parents in Soyland, W. Yorkshire
1861 age  in Rochdale with parents (there is an odd entry shown on Family Search  which shows father as "Jones", not James, and Daniel age 4!  He should be 18 and is nevertheless described as a Cotton Worker.
1871 millworker age 28 with wife and family in Newhey/Butterworth area of Rochdale
1881 millworker age 38 with wife Betty and family in Newhey
1891 millworker age 48 in Crompton area with family
1901 farmer age 58 at Knott Booth, Burnedge with son James, farmer's son

in 1896 his daughter married and his address then was also Knott Booth farm. I am wondering what kind of circumstances would lead a millworker to become a farmer, as I consider it to be a profession which is handed down from father to son in the main.  His wife's family were also millworkers.

Knott Booth Farm still exists and is a Grade 2 listed building with mullioned windows and other attractive sounding features.  I have found records of farmer William Witham (no relative) living there in 1879.

Any ideas where I could look to see exactly when beteen 1891 and 1896 he moved to Knott Booth and how he came to be a farmer??

Sorry, somehow I managed to print this twice
:-[

22
The Common Room / Re: Reichswald Forest War Cemetery visit offer
« on: Thursday 30 May 19 14:36 BST (UK)  »
You are doing sterling work, RTL, especially as you are also working and looking after a grandchild!  I'm retired now, but was rehearsing and then performing in a concert this week.

It's interesting to read the Staffordshire newspaper excerpt about the Cooks and read that George senior and Charlotte were present, also George Loundes (sic) junr. At around 18 years old maybe he hadn't yet been called up at what must have been just before the beginning of the war.  Also present seem to be George's 3 sisters (K, M & C as you have already found).

Now, if this is a further marriage for Elizabeth Elsie Lowndes nee Wilson with William Cook in Mar Q 1949 it makes me wonder whether William was a Cook relative of some sort.  From the earlier newspaper notices you mentioned she is clearly called by her second forename. 





23
The Common Room / Re: Reichswald Forest War Cemetery visit offer
« on: Wednesday 29 May 19 12:44 BST (UK)  »
George Lowndes' birth appears to have been registered in Kings Norton in Dec Q 1922, son of George and Charlotte (nee Cook). George and Charlotte were married in Newcastle under Lyme in June Q 1914.

Still working on George junior and Elizabeth Elsie Patterson's marriage in June Q 1944, as it looks as though she may have been a widow.

24
The Common Room / Re: Reichswald Forest War Cemetery visit offer
« on: Sunday 26 May 19 16:35 BST (UK)  »
I received an almost immediate and most appreciative response from Janet at NEWMP.  She tells me that the photo will be uploaded onto the site soon.  The newspaper tribute from his young bride which you found will be special addition, too.  How sad that he never saw his little daughter.  I wonder if she knows about the site or has visited the cemetery.

Not far from the Reichswald cemetery, but on the Dutch side of the border, is the Canadian war cemetery of Groesbeek.  This I have also visited to see the name of my uncle listed on a wall rather than a gravestone.  Sadly, although he is assumed to have fallen somewhere near Arnhem, his body was never found, so he does not merit a gravestone.  Like George Lowndes he never saw his younger son, and his older son, only a few years old at the time, has no memory of his father either.  What dreadful times and what a waste of human lives! 

25
The Common Room / Re: Reichswald Forest War Cemetery visit offer
« on: Sunday 26 May 19 12:12 BST (UK)  »
We visited the Reichswald Air Force Cemetery on a bright sunny day.  This peaceful spor, surrounded by the forest trees and alive with birdsong, is beautifully cared for by the CWGC, like the other war cemeteries.  It was not difficult to find Sgt. George Lowndes' gravestone as the rows and numbers were clearly marked.  George's stone stands next to those of his crew - the pilot, navigator, flight engineer (Lowndes), gunner and flight officer. Reading the ages of the men whose names are on these stones is heart-breaking - George was 23 and recently married.  There are stones for fallen Canadian and Polish airmen, too, and also a small number of stones bearing simply the inscription "Known unto God" - honouring men who could not be identified.

I am forwarding the photos we took to the website RTL suggested and hope they will be of interest. 

26
The Lighter Side / Re: Hard Times
« on: Thursday 09 May 19 11:16 BST (UK)  »
In the 1881 census I found my grandmother age 12 and her brother age 10 both working as piecers in a woollen mill. Their address was Mill Yard and their father was also working at the mill as a selfact minder.

27
The Common Room / Re: Reichswald Forest War Cemetery visit offer
« on: Sunday 28 April 19 11:52 BST (UK)  »
I've located Sergeant Lowndes' gravestone on the cemetery plan, so will take a photo and send it to the website you mention

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