Author Topic: What was a hallier?  (Read 4103 times)

Offline Jane Swan

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Re: What was a hallier?
« Reply #9 on: Thursday 01 December 05 18:21 GMT (UK) »
Hi Prue

According to Colin Waters book A dictionary of old trades, titles and occupations a hallier is a wild bird catcher who caught birds alive ie not a hunter

Jane
Notts: Burrows, Comery, Foster, Beeson, Haynes, Swan.  Derbys: Burrows, Comery, Smith  Lincs: King.  Warks & Salop: Swan, Duffy.  Dublin: Duffy, Geraghty, Burgess.  Monmouth: Lewis

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Offline PrueM

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Re: What was a hallier?
« Reply #10 on: Thursday 01 December 05 19:57 GMT (UK) »
Hi Jane,
Gosh!  That's thrown the cat among the pigeons (no pun intended)!  How interesting...talk about a career change, from bird catcher to factory worker within 10 years!
Prue

P.S.  Welcome, StHallier!  Afraid I can't help with your family name search, but I wish you good luck.  You could try posting your enquiry in a new topic, it might attract more readers.  :)

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Offline Jane Swan

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Re: What was a hallier?
« Reply #11 on: Friday 02 December 05 07:47 GMT (UK) »
Hi Prue

As it was so different I double and triple checked the entry and that is what it says. though why you would want to catch live birds in Bromsgrove I can't imagine. May be they stayed fresher until you ate them!
A hallier maker-a manufacturer of a special kind of net for catching wild birds.

The nailer surprisingly is defined as your 2nd option:
Nailer- same as card nailer. Rarely one who uses nails for construction.
Card nailer- Machine maintenance worker in a cloth mill (often self employed).

But interestingly remembering the accuracy of spelling on census data:
Nailor - nail maker.

Jane
Notts: Burrows, Comery, Foster, Beeson, Haynes, Swan.  Derbys: Burrows, Comery, Smith  Lincs: King.  Warks & Salop: Swan, Duffy.  Dublin: Duffy, Geraghty, Burgess.  Monmouth: Lewis

Information contained within Census Lookups is Crown Copyright:  www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline behindthefrogs

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Re: What was a hallier?
« Reply #12 on: Friday 09 December 05 20:17 GMT (UK) »
Nailer, meaning a maker of nails is usually in the census spelt with an "e".

I have a number of ancestors from Halesowen who were nailers and nail factors all involved in the process of producing nails.  These were made at home where it was a poorly paid piece rate industry.  It was the main industry in that area of the midlands and Bromsgrove is almost the next parish.

I am voting for nailer.

David
Living in Berkshire from Northampton & Milton Keynes
DETAILS OF MY NAMES ARE IN SURNAME INTERESTS, LINK AT FOOT OF PAGE
Wilson, Higgs, Buswell, PARCELL, Matthews, TAMKIN, Seckington, Pates, Coupland, Webb, Arthur, MAYNARD, Caves, Norman, Winch, Culverhouse, Drakeley.
Johnson, Routledge, SHIRT, SAICH, Mills, SAUNDERS, EDLIN, Perry, Vickers, Pakeman, Griffiths, Marston, Turner, Child, Sheen, Gray, Woolhouse, Stevens, Batchelor
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Offline Hackstaple

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Re: What was a hallier?
« Reply #13 on: Friday 09 December 05 22:10 GMT (UK) »
The topic was what is a "hallier". The nailer is another entry on the same page. I see it as spelt with an "e" and not with an "o" in any case.
It is almost impossible that the person who wrote down the census page used hallier and nailer or nailor as alternative spellings of the same job. The word "hallier" is clear for all to see. I am not claiming that my interpretation is the only possible one but a hallier is not a nailer of any kind. 8)
But back to Jane who asks why someone would want to catch live birds in Bromsgrove - you cannot catch dead ones!  ;D
Southern or Southan [Hereford , Monmouthshire & Glos], Jenkins, Meredith and Morgan [Monmouthshire and Glos.], Murrill, Damary, Damry, Ray, Lawrence [all Middx. & London], Nethway from Kenn or Yatton. Also Riley and Lyons in South Africa and Riley from St. Helena.
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Offline Jane Swan

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Re: What was a hallier?
« Reply #14 on: Saturday 10 December 05 07:05 GMT (UK) »
Hi Hack

But back to Jane who asks why someone would want to catch live birds in Bromsgrove - you cannot catch dead ones!

Too true, I take your point!

Jane
Notts: Burrows, Comery, Foster, Beeson, Haynes, Swan.  Derbys: Burrows, Comery, Smith  Lincs: King.  Warks & Salop: Swan, Duffy.  Dublin: Duffy, Geraghty, Burgess.  Monmouth: Lewis

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Offline crowkie

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Re: What was a hallier?
« Reply #15 on: Wednesday 18 January 17 15:31 GMT (UK) »
I have a relative in 1841 called 'Haughliers.' Crazy spelling of Hauliers or what?

Offline robbo43

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Re: What was a hallier?
« Reply #16 on: Monday 20 March 17 23:07 GMT (UK) »
As an outside possibility a hallier might be someone who man-hauled boats on rivers of canals.
FLOOD - Exeter, Middlesex.  DAVEY - Norfolk, Herts, West Ham.  MILLS - Hampshire.  GARLAND - Sussex.  BRIGHT - Hampshire, GULLIVER - Hampshire, Sussex, London.  NOCKELS - Norfolk.  POMEROY - Exeter.  RANDALL - Sussex, Surrey.  REYNOLDS - Cambridgeshire.  BOWYER - Cambridgeshire & Suffolk.  STUPPELL - Kent.  MISSEN - Cambridgeshire.  TAYLOR - Cambridgeshire.  TOWNSEND - London.  CURTIN - London, GIBBONS - Suffolk, BROWN - Suffolk, SWALE(S) - Yorkshire, GAIN - Sussex