Author Topic: Williamson  (Read 39897 times)

Offline hdw

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Re: Williamson
« Reply #54 on: Tuesday 10 May 16 23:45 BST (UK) »

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Offline hdw

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Re: Williamson
« Reply #55 on: Tuesday 10 May 16 23:54 BST (UK) »
His death-notice is third from the bottom of the page. Aged 42 when he died. There are lots of John Williamsons born around 1738 on Scotlandspeople and I don't know which one is him.

He died , 25th Sept. 1780 . of a "Brows", presumably a bruise, full marks for understatement.

Harry


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Offline ankerdine

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Re: Williamson
« Reply #56 on: Wednesday 11 May 16 08:34 BST (UK) »
There's something very poignant about these very old records that gets me every time. The causes of death are stated so simply; "swelling" could this be cancer?

There seems to be a respect though for these unfortunate folk whether young or old.

Is it Boatnest Gardens or Beautiest Garden, Harry?

Judy
Blair, Marshall, Williamson - Ayrshire, Wigtownshire
Saxton, Sketchley - Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire
Brown, Green - Rutland
Hawker, Malone, Bradbury, Arnott, Turner, Woodings, Blakemore, Upton, Merricks - Warwickshire, Staffordshire
Silvers, Dudley, Worcs
Deakin - Staffordshire

Offline hdw

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Re: Williamson
« Reply #57 on: Wednesday 11 May 16 08:58 BST (UK) »
It looks like Boatnest, doesn't it? I suppose that could be an attempt to spell Botanist.

Harry

Offline ChristopherWilliamson

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Re: Williamson
« Reply #58 on: Wednesday 25 April 18 17:18 BST (UK) »
Hello All,

         I've done about seven years worth of research on the genealogical roots of my surname, which is Williamson. What I have come to find is that the name originated from the son of George the Crowner, the first formally verifiable chief of Clan Gunn, his son being William of Gunn. The Clan Williamson became a sept of Clan Gunn when William Williamson (Son of William of Gunn) gained permission from the Clan Gunn Chieftain to begin his own Clan line. This is generally believed to have taken place between 1480 - 1500, since these are difficult to place as the northern clans used a method of "word of mouth" to pass their history from generation to generation, which was the tradition of their Pictish ancestors. This is outside of the symbols carved into stone, for which the Picts are known. What's crucial to remember is that the he Clan Gunn is descended from Vikings who later intermingled with Northern Scotland's Pictish tribes.

       William Williamson is addressed as so being that one of the dialectic traditions of the clan systems is to form a surname that identifies your lineage, i.e. Williamson - Son of William. This would have been, and was, kept to later identify the clan you're affiliated with and its origin from the ancient ancestral line of William of Gunn, outside of the Tartan system. The Williamson's did well in it's role as a sept of Clan Gunn, but I have found no documentation of recognition from the crown regarding clan legitimacy and gaining a formal seat within the peerage system. At least not through my direct line to William, this could be different regarding the McKay line.

         In regard to the Williamson's immigration to Ireland, this happened after the family had set roots in Fifeshire, and had done so around the time of the English Civil war where Oliver Cromwell usurped control of the state from Charles the I and executed him in 1642. The Williamson's along with many other Scottish Clans fought on the side of the royalists to reinstate Charles the II to the throne being that he was of Scottish decent and the peerage system added legitimacy to the clan system as well. Samuel Williamson, the ancestor that I am directly descended from, immigrated from Fifeshire to Ulster in 1720 where many Presbyterians were migrating to in order to distance themselves from the religious turmoil in England and Scotland. In 1723 he immigrated to Pennsylvania, where a great number of Scottish Presbyterians had settled. This began one of the many lines of Williamson's in America. Samuels Son, Moses Williamson, gave birth to my (x5) Great-Grand Father Thomas Williamson who fought in the Revolutionary war. Moses was also brother to Hugh Williamson, my (x5) Great-Uncle who was the first representative of North Carolina and helped to draft and sign the Constitution, unfortunately both of Hugh's sons died from what they have just labeled a "Sickness, so his line ended. So, from this point on the Williamson's continued their slow journey west through the generations.

I have more detailed research, but for the sake of my fingers...I digress. I hope my summation helped tell a little bit of the story, and helped shed light on your lineage as well.

Offline ChristopherWilliamson

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Re: Williamson
« Reply #59 on: Wednesday 25 April 18 17:38 BST (UK) »
Hello All,

         I've done about seven years worth of research on the genealogical roots of my surname, which is Williamson. What I have come to find is that the name originated from the son of George the Crowner, the first formally verifiable chief of Clan Gunn, his son being William of Gunn. The Clan Williamson became a sept of Clan Gunn when William Williamson (Son of William of Gunn) gained permission from the Clan Gunn Chieftain to begin his own Clan line. This is generally believed to have taken place between 1480 - 1500, since these are difficult to place as the northern clans used a method of "word of mouth" to pass their history from generation to generation, which was the tradition of their Pictish ancestors. This is outside of the symbols carved into stone, for which the Picts are known. What's crucial to remember is that the he Clan Gunn is descended from Vikings who later intermingled with Northern Scotland's Pictish tribes.

       William Williamson is addressed as so being that one of the dialectic traditions of the clan systems is to form a surname that identifies your lineage, i.e. Williamson - Son of William. This would have been, and was, kept to later identify the clan you're affiliated with and its origin from the ancient ancestral line of William of Gunn, outside of the Tartan system. The Williamson's did well in it's role as a sept of Clan Gunn, but I have found no documentation of recognition from the crown regarding clan legitimacy and gaining a formal seat within the peerage system. At least not through my direct line to William, this could be different regarding the McKay line.

         In regard to the Williamson's immigration to Ireland, this happened after the family had set roots in Fifeshire, and had done so around the time of the English Civil war where Oliver Cromwell usurped control of the state from Charles the I and executed him in 1642. The Williamson's along with many other Scottish Clans fought on the side of the royalists to reinstate Charles the II to the throne being that he was of Scottish decent and the peerage system added legitimacy to the clan system as well. Samuel Williamson, the ancestor that I am directly descended from, immigrated from Fifeshire to Ulster in 1720 where many Presbyterians were migrating to in order to distance themselves from the religious turmoil in England and Scotland. In 1723 he immigrated to Pennsylvania, where a great number of Scottish Presbyterians had settled. This began one of the many lines of Williamson's in America. Samuels Son, Moses Williamson, gave birth to my (x5) Great-Grand Father Thomas Williamson who fought in the Revolutionary war. Moses was also brother to Hugh Williamson, my (x5) Great-Uncle who was the first representative of North Carolina and helped to draft and sign the Constitution, unfortunately both of Hugh's sons died from what they have just labeled a "Sickness, so his line ended. So, from this point on the Williamson's continued their slow journey west through the generations.

I have more detailed research, but for the sake of my fingers...I digress. I hope my summation helped tell a little bit of the story, and helped shed light on your lineage as well.