Author Topic: Master Hairdressers  (Read 30445 times)

Offline anthea36

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Re: Master Hairdressers
« Reply #27 on: Sunday 30 September 07 18:18 BST (UK) »
Hello

I'd just like to add my thanks for all the information on Hairdressers. I had found it hard finding out much about early Hairdressers so found the contributions on this thread really useful.

My hairdressers were:
James Matthews (b 1797), Southgate Street, Bath from 1841 to 1871. His son John (b1830) and daughter Mary (b1827) were also listed as hairdressers at the same address.

Another son James (b1823) - moved to Gt Queen Street, London where he was hairdressing from 1851-1881.

Finally, yet another son Richard (b1825) was hairdressing between Bath and London up to 1891.

Talk about keep it in the family! 
Maunder/Mannder/Maunde, Thame, Oxon
White, Ashton Rowant, Oxon
Bass, Chinnor, Oxon
Harding, Bucks, Herts
Nightingale, Middex
Matthews, Somerset
Williams, Hackney, London

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Offline LizzieW

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Re: Master Hairdressers
« Reply #28 on: Monday 01 October 07 00:25 BST (UK) »
Quote
According to family tradition(!) he travelled widely in Europe tending to the hair of the nobility. 

Like TonyJ, I was also told this about one of my g.g.grandfather's although I don't think there is any proof.  He died in 1865 aged only 39.  I'm getting his death certificate to find out what he died of, although I think drink may have played its part.

Liz

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Offline xxclaretheonexx

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Re: Master Hairdressers
« Reply #29 on: Tuesday 17 March 09 18:15 GMT (UK) »
My Great  Great Grandfather was a Hairdresser -  Im having trouble finding out about him His Name was Henry Harvey , I believe his hairdressing shops were in London near The Kingsland Road , think he was born about 1829 ish

Would be grateful for any further information - Thanks , Clare

Offline skyblueFF

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Re: Master Hairdressers
« Reply #30 on: Wednesday 18 March 09 09:50 GMT (UK) »
My ggf GUSTAV HEISE came from Germany in the 1880s.and became a  master hairdresser, latterly  in Birkenhead before he was interned in the WW1.After his release he went back to Germany.
Read all about him on my post in the immigrants to Britain,   Europe board.
His brother ERNEST HEISE  was also a hairdresser but I haven't found out what became of him yet.
Michael
HEISE ,Germany, London and Birkenhead.
HARTWELL. London. Arundel.
CAPSTICK, Westmorland and Liverpool
BUTLER Liverpool
CHARTERS,  Walton Liverpool
GORE,Sefton, Liverpool .
CRUICE Roscommon and Liverpool.
ROBINSON, Westmorland.
ATKINSON,Westmorland.
DACRE, Westmorland.
FORSHAW,Sefton,Liverpool

Offline chirp

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Re: Master Hairdressers
« Reply #31 on: Wednesday 18 March 09 09:54 GMT (UK) »
It's comforting to know that other people are seeking information on hairdressing ancestors. My hairdresser was also a perfumer and master wig maker. He was Thomas Mellish and lived and worked in Finsbury London. He was born in the 1770s and I have a copy of an insurance policy he took out in 1820 which covered his premises, wearing apparel, plate, items used in his business etc which suggests he might have operated his business from his home but I'm not sure. Am currently trying to find him in trade directories. I would love to know about his working life, who his clients were, what he actually did and where he served his apprenticeship. If I find out anything useful I will post it here to assist others. I haven't found any of this children following the same career. Sometimes I think of him powdering the wigs of a regency dandy and sometimes a Sweeney Todd image springs to mind! He certainly intrigues me.
AVERY, Berks, BLUNDELL, North Meols, BOND, Wilts,  BRUNDRETT, Lancs, CHORLTON, Salford, DUNKLEY, West Haddon, FOGGIN, Yorks, GRANT, Durham,  GRESTY, Salford, GRINDROD, Salford, HUMM, Bethnal Green, MALONEY, Limerick & Lancs,  MARCHANT, Worcs, McPHERSON, Kent, MELLISH, Finsbury, PERRETT, Wilts,  RAGG, Yorks, RAINSFORD, Staffs, RENSHAW, Salford, ROSS, Leicester, TIGHE/TYE, All, WELLER, Berks, WILKINSON, Wes
Early 19th C Hairdressing & Perfumery
Spittalfields Silkweavers
Glass making, S Shields

Offline failsafe

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Re: Master Hairdressers
« Reply #32 on: Monday 23 March 09 22:38 GMT (UK) »
Sorry to all if this has been mentioned in previous post

A master hairdresser was usually associated with that of an employer and more than likely belonged to a 'guild' to enhance status.

Depending on the time frame you are working with, a hairdresser was in all a wig maker, very fashionable and would have earned, as any other tradesman, more than that of the unskilled. Even more so since those who were indentured to the trade were exploited.

Once those who had mastered the craft were free. they could travel the country as what is described as a journeyman (which comes from the French word journ) who had completed his apprenticeship and was competant with his trade who could be hired by the day, wherever.

This would most likely to have been the case with many.

Note however, that this occupation was quite different to that of a 'barber' who tended to use his skills mainly on male clients, and had nothing whatsoever to do with wig making. Indeed, their secondary occupation was that of an unqualified doctor, hence the barbers pole being red and white - red as a symbolism of blood.

Hope this sheds light on the subject

failsafe
Social History.
Labour & Trade Union History.

Whittaker's - Manchester.


Take care to get what you like or you will be forced to like what you get.

Offline chirp

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Re: Master Hairdressers
« Reply #33 on: Tuesday 24 March 09 08:38 GMT (UK) »
Many thanks failsafe. Yes this all fits with what I have read. The wig apparently was by far the most expensive item of a person's wardrobe. A Hairdressers' Guild still exists but when I contacted them to ask if they have an archives section I didn't receive a reply which was disappointing. Though I appreciate that barbers were not the same thing, I have written to the Barber Surgeons Co simply to see if someone there can point me in the right direction. If/when I receive a reply I will add a post here.
Chirp
AVERY, Berks, BLUNDELL, North Meols, BOND, Wilts,  BRUNDRETT, Lancs, CHORLTON, Salford, DUNKLEY, West Haddon, FOGGIN, Yorks, GRANT, Durham,  GRESTY, Salford, GRINDROD, Salford, HUMM, Bethnal Green, MALONEY, Limerick & Lancs,  MARCHANT, Worcs, McPHERSON, Kent, MELLISH, Finsbury, PERRETT, Wilts,  RAGG, Yorks, RAINSFORD, Staffs, RENSHAW, Salford, ROSS, Leicester, TIGHE/TYE, All, WELLER, Berks, WILKINSON, Wes
Early 19th C Hairdressing & Perfumery
Spittalfields Silkweavers
Glass making, S Shields

Offline TonyJ

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Re: Master Hairdressers
« Reply #34 on: Tuesday 24 March 09 09:59 GMT (UK) »
Thanks also.  My gg gfather is described in 1851 as Apprentice (relationship to Head) & Hairdresser (occup), in 1861 his relationship is Journeyman & occup Hairdresser and in 1871 when he is the Head he is a Hairdresser.  He was in Grantham in 1851 & Chipping Barnet in 1861 staying with his employers.  In 1871 he was living in Deptford Kent with wife & family.
I dont have any evidence of his supposed travelling "widely in Europe tending to the hair of the nobility" (as I mentioned previously) although this *may* have been fitted between 1861 & 1863 (when he married in London) & possibly before my ggmother was born in 1868. 
Another of these mysteries ....
Tony
Coutts, Robb, Lamont - Scotland
Lammas, Perkins, Major, Jones - England

Offline BumbleB

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Re: Master Hairdressers
« Reply #35 on: Tuesday 24 March 09 13:43 GMT (UK) »
I've also got hairdressers in the family name I'm researching - Archbell of Tadcaster - three generations of them.

The earlier ones are classed as Barbers, whilst one of the middle generation is classed as a peruke maker when he marries in 1787.  There were three hairdressers in Tadcaster in the 1820s, one of whom also sold perfume and two of them were related.  And the death certificate of one of the widows in 1875 stated that she was the widow of a hairdresser and perfumer.

Plus I have a later hairdresser in another of my families. 

BumbleB
Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
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Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY