Author Topic: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member  (Read 10969 times)

Offline mixyblob

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Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« on: Friday 21 December 07 21:50 GMT (UK) »
Hi,
I have an entry in an 1861 census for a boy aged 7 whose relationship with the head is detailed as a boarder. He is obviously being provided with food and lodgings but has anyone found one to be a family member?

Thanks
Poulton Oxford, London Torquay

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Offline suey

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #1 on: Friday 21 December 07 21:54 GMT (UK) »

Hmmm :-\  I think I did a census look-up for someone recently where a grandson was described as 'boarder'.

Probably un-usual but possible.

Do you have any other evidence to support the relationships within this particular family?

Suey
All census lookups are Crown Copyright from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Sussex - Knapp. Nailard. Potten. Coleman. Pomfrey. Carter. Picknell
Greenwich/Woolwich. - Clowting. Davis. Kitts. Ferguson. Lowther. Carvalho. Pressman. Redknap. Argent.
Hertfordshire - Sturgeon. Bird. Rule. Claxton. Taylor. Braggins

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Offline suey

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #2 on: Friday 21 December 07 21:56 GMT (UK) »

I see this was your first post! - Welcome to Rootschat mixyblob... :D

Suey
All census lookups are Crown Copyright from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Sussex - Knapp. Nailard. Potten. Coleman. Pomfrey. Carter. Picknell
Greenwich/Woolwich. - Clowting. Davis. Kitts. Ferguson. Lowther. Carvalho. Pressman. Redknap. Argent.
Hertfordshire - Sturgeon. Bird. Rule. Claxton. Taylor. Braggins

Online avm228

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #3 on: Friday 21 December 07 21:58 GMT (UK) »
Hello and a warm welcome to Rootschat :)

Yes, I've seen it several times - grandchildren, nieces, nephews, in-laws described as "boarder".

Anna
Ayr: Barnes, Wylie
Caithness: MacGregor
Essex: Eldred (Pebmarsh)
Gloucs: Timbrell (Winchcomb)
Hants: Stares (Wickham)
Lincs: Maw, Jackson (Epworth, Belton)
London: Pierce
Suffolk: Markham (Framlingham)
Surrey: Gosling (Richmond)
Wilts: Matthews, Tarrant (Calne, Preshute)
Worcs: Milward (Redditch)
Yorks: Beaumont, Crook, Moore, Styring (Huddersfield); Middleton (Church Fenton); Exley, Gelder (High Hoyland); Barnes, Birchinall (Sheffield); Kenyon, Wood (Cumberworth/Denby Dale)

Offline mixyblob

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #4 on: Friday 21 December 07 22:22 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for your replies Anna & Suey.

The young boy was my great great grandfather. Yes there is  a strong possibility of a family link but I am having trouble proving it. One of the daugters of the Head of family that census day went on to be his  guardian.  Not sure what that actually means at the moment !
Poulton Oxford, London Torquay

Offline Springbok

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #5 on: Friday 21 December 07 22:48 GMT (UK) »
Welcome to Rootchat, Mixy

I had a similar case for a 71yr old, described as Boarder, he was living with the family of a  younger cousin (as Head)(I had already the connection from a descendant).

What was interesting, is that his wife is also in the same house,but in a differant room, as Head. As the husband died that year, and the wife , the next  I can only think that she was not fit enough to care for him.

Only a guess but seems to make sense

Spring
Dorset: Ackerman,Bungey,Bunter Chant,Hyle
Islington:Bedford, Eaton,Wilkins
Beds,Fulham: Brazier
Shoreditch: Burton,Coverdale
Essex ,Clerkenwell:Craswell,Cresswell
St.Lukes Middx:Doughty, Dunkley
Andover/IOW/Fulham:Gasser
Fulham: Neal
Bucks:Putnam,Wingrove
Bullwell.Notts:Wilkinson
Clerkenwell/Islington:Wyllie
Herts/ Tottenham/Walthamstow:Young

Offline C_Bishop

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 29 December 07 22:40 GMT (UK) »
Hi mixyblob
Welcome to rootschat!  :)

I found quite a few "boarders" during my searches. My 4x Gt Grandparents  seemed to send their children to a family in Sussex (they lived in Surrey) to board with an unrelated family. I still don't know the reasons or why this family. I might find one day the relationship between them!

Another episode i found was my Carlton family who had a 2year old "boarder" She appeared in a 1851 census and then there was no sign of her in 1861. I was wondering at the time if it was a daughter of one of the unmarried daughters but with a different last name i was only clutching at straws.  Also the Carlton family didn't appear to have other relatives where they were in Bristol (parents being from Ireland and a big brickwall so don't know if she was a neice etc) so can't make a link for her. Quite young to not be with parents.

Those are some of my examples of this happening, but unfortunately i have not been able to crack any of the relationships, hopefully one day though!

Do you know his parents? Maybe a birth cert might reveal who his parents are and possibly a link!

Good luck with your search!
Cat  :)
Bishop:  Sussex, New Zealand
Henwood:  England
Harris: London; Smith, Leicestershire
Chandler: Sussex
Truelove: Surrey, New Zealand
Blackburn: Lancashire
Carlton: Australia, NZ, Bristol, Ireland
Foster:NZ, Queensland, Yorkshire,
Marshall: Yorkshire, Lancashire
Cannon:Ireland to NZ
Turner:England
Farquharson: Scotland, Australia
Durward: Scotland<br
Johnston: Australia, Cumberland, Dumfries
Gearon: Ireland,NZ

Offline Erato

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 29 December 07 23:40 GMT (UK) »
I found an ancestor listed on the census as a "lodger" but that was crossed out and replaced with "relative."  In fact, the man was the husband of the head of household who had suddenly reappeared after a mysterious 25-year absence during which his wife had listed herself as a widow.
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr

Offline Roobarb

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #8 on: Sunday 30 December 07 00:35 GMT (UK) »
Hi mixyblob, welcome to Rootschat!


On the census for my gt gt grandparents there was a thirteen year old girl living with them who was listed as Boarder. Her surname was the same as my gt gt grandmother's maiden name, so I was pretty sure she was a relative. After much digging I found that she was the illegitimate daughter of my gt gt grandmother. She married when she was an adult, in the surname of my gt gt grandfather. That one was certainly confusing!
I have found several other Boarders who were related to the family, sometimes quite distantly. It has often paid off for me to follow up these people if I suspect that they are related.
Bell, Salter, Street - Devon, Middlesbrough.
Lickess- North Yorkshire, Middlesbrough.
Etherington - North Yorks and Durham.
Barker- North Yorks
Crooks- Durham
Forster- North Yorks/Durham
Newsam, Pattison, Proud - North Yorks.
Timothy, Griffiths, Jones - South Wales