Author Topic: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member  (Read 10922 times)

Offline LizzieW

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #18 on: Monday 27 November 17 13:38 GMT (UK) »
Quote
In one census i have a 2 year old listed as visitor it turns out she is the niece of the wife (wouldn't she be the husbands niece also?)

I think it depends how you define niece.  The niece you mentioned was presumably the child of one of the wife's siblings, so technically not the niece of the husband.  In the same way that my husband's sister in law is married to his brother not mine, so as far as I'm concerned she's not my sister in law. My sister in law is the person who married my brother.

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Online BushInn1746

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #19 on: Wednesday 27 June 18 09:56 BST (UK) »
Hello

'Boarder' or 'Visitor' may be related, or may not be related, to someone in the residence household.

On my Mother's side of my family, I have a 'Visitor' aged 8, in the 1841 Census and her surname is the same as the maiden surname of the Wife of the Head of the household, so likely related.

Orphan
Also seen a 'Boarder' who had been orphaned and living with relatives.

Religion
Also seen a 'Boarder' living in a family linked with the same religion.

Although my family were not Quakers, they had business links with Quakers in the 1830s onward and I have got a later 'Boarder' relative apparently living with a Quaker family.

You may ask what use is the same religion with 'Boarder' and his residence family? However, if one side of your family are untraceable circa 1780 - 1841, it may suggest Nonconformism and these may be vital clues for the family historian, to investigate and probe in greater detail.

Nonconformism is a great nuisance when tracing your family history, because it is my belief that probably as many as 35 to 50% of Nonconformist (NC) Chapel Birth / Baptism records were not kept 18th Century or have not survived.

We can often prove a NC, Independent (later Congregational), Dissenters, Baptist, or Presbyterian (some became Unitarian) Chapels existed, but there are no surviving Birth records.

Works at Same Workplace or Apprenticed to Head or Household Family Member
There sometimes seem to be an occupation link, between the 'Boarder' and a member of the Residence Family.

Mark
"George HOOD of Selby" Before 1812?

Born about 1785 (Yorkshire per 1841 Census)

Married Sarah RUSSELL at Selby 1815 newspaper - "both of that place".

Buried in the Quaker Burial Ground at Selby as "Not in Membership" in 1845, aged 60 years.

George HOOD of Selby was refused Membership of the Quakers in 1836.

Elected Overseer of the Poor of Selby in 1838.

Had both known (Selby) and unknown (some not stated 1846) property interests.

Possible (but unknown) links to COOK and/or PEARSON names.

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Offline Regorian

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #20 on: Wednesday 27 June 18 10:10 BST (UK) »
I have one example. Marked as 'lodger' rather than father in 1871 Census aged 92. He was living with a sons family. He died 1871 and had been married to a sister of my gggrandfather.

Offline iluleah

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #21 on: Wednesday 27 June 18 10:48 BST (UK) »
Hi and welcome to rootschat ;D

Short answer is yes, the enumerator wrote down what they were told, by the adult of the household, by a child who answered the door, by a neighbour and sometimes just write what they thought they knew without asking anyone.

In one census my great grandfather is written as grandson ( living with his grandparents) two other children were written as visitors and an adult was written as a lodger, after research the two visitors were my great grandfathers full  siblings ( great grandfather was using his maternal grandparents surname so his name was different to his siblings)  the adult was a sibling to my great great grandmother
Leicestershire:Chamberlain, Dakin, Wilkinson, Moss, Cook, Welland, Dobson, Roper,Palfreman, Squires, Hames, Goddard, Topliss, Twells,Bacon.
Northamps:Sykes, Harris, Rice,Knowles.
Rutland:Clements, Dalby, Osbourne, Durance, Smith,Christian, Royce, Richardson,Oakham, Dewey,Newbold,Cox,Chamberlaine,Brow, Cooper, Bloodworth,Clarke
Durham/Yorks:Woodend, Watson,Parker, Dowser
Suffolk/Norfolk:Groom, Coleman, Kemp, Barnard, Alden,Blomfield,Smith,Howes,Knight,Kett,Fryston
Lincolnshire:Clements, Woodend

Offline brigidmac

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #22 on: Wednesday 27 June 18 11:02 BST (UK) »
Very interested in this question and am hopping on board to ask another linked query

So my grandmother was a boarder age 1 in a family related to her birth parents by profession in Birkenhead

Boarder does imply payments

Her father was ordered to pay a weekly amount to birth mother
 an affiliation order til child would be 13 years old

The single mother left to work   was in Manchester 2 years later

Would the father have paid the host family directly

When such orders were made how did the single mothers obtain their payments

Did they have to collect at equivalent of benefits office

Did the named fathers have to take the weekly payments directly
Was there some kind of payment system via post office

Wonder if my grandmother knew payments were made for her....did her father manage to fulfil court ordered maintenance til she was 13

In cases where single mothers married but child stayed in boarding house would payments still be legally binding
Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid MCDERMID McDiarmid Gardner Jones ,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson ,McKay

Offline iolaus

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #23 on: Wednesday 27 June 18 20:23 BST (UK) »
By visitor they may just have meant she's only visiting - ie she's staying tonight (so correctly marked on the census as here) but going home in the morning

I have one on a census as boarder - technically he's not related to the head of the house - but they took in their orphaned niece (his brother's child) and the 'boarder' is the little girl's grandfather (her mother's father)

I'm sure I read somewhere that boarder meant they had meals etc as part of the family, whereas Lodgers rented a room but made own arrangements for food etc

Offline bevj

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #24 on: Wednesday 27 June 18 20:36 BST (UK) »
I have a case in my own tree where son, daughter-in-law and two children are recorded as boarders in the household of the son's parents.

Bev
Weedon - Hertfordshire and W. Australia
Herbertson, Congalton, Paterson - Scotland
Reed, Elmer - Hunts.
Branson - Bucks. and Birmingham
Warren, Ball, Jones - Birmingham
Fuller, Bourne, Sheepwash - Kent
Brittain - Beds. and W. Australia