Author Topic: Butler family  (Read 4935 times)

Offline Maggie moon

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Re: Butler family
« Reply #9 on: Saturday 08 April 17 15:49 BST (UK) »
Thank you .  Did you have the testing done? What did it reveal? I did have my DNA tested through ancestry.ca .  I am mostly Irish,  secondly British and thirdly Scandinavian  .
Maggie

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Offline RobertCasey

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Re: Butler family
« Reply #10 on: Saturday 08 April 17 18:03 BST (UK) »
Yes - I have tested YDNA extensively for my Casey line which is L226. I was the first in the world to take a Next Generation Sequence test for L226 from Full Genomes Corporation. With my test, I received 55 private YSNPs that were private only to me at first. Two years later, eight of these private YSNPs are now branches of mankind - including two branches in the genealogical time frame (this is a genetic testing term that the vast majority of testers have the same surname). Here is my part of the our L226 descendant chart:

http://www.rcasey.net/DNA/R_L226/Haplotrees/L226_Home.pdf#Page=27

I have the following brick wall my Casey line: 1) we now that this line arrived in western South Carolina in the early 1750s; 2) By 1800, there were around 50 males in the census and traditional research of South Carolina records have only revealed around 10 connections (mostly the sons of one prominent family); 3) We have been researching this line for 40 years and have been to South Carolina dozens of times (over 50 Casey researchers) with little progress on connecting our lines via traditional reserch; 4) a very poorly written manuscript in the 1960s connected all the lines which people just copy and paste - he had our South Carolina line tied to Virginia Casey lines.

Here is what we have learned to date: 1) Several of the Virginia Casey lines have been tested that are supposed to be connected - none are even remotely connected genetically to our South Carolina line - still the Internet connections remain. We now believe that our Casey family moved from Ireland in the 1740s during the massive crop failures and that they probably directly moved to western South Carolina (vs. coming earlier via Virginia); 2) Around 20 different lines have now tested - all but one line are very closely related (200 to 400 years). One line, Elisha Casey, just randomly showed up with the others - his lines have a lot recent ties to Ireland.; 3) We now have two YSNP branches that are genealogical in nature. If you test positive for FGC5647, you are related to our Casey line in the last 200 to 400 years. If you test FGC5639, you are related in the last 200 to 300 years; 4) only person has tested FGC5647 positive and FGC5639 negative. He traces his line back to Oxford, England in the early 1600s. His surname is Kersey but he is definitely Irish in the last 400 years. We believe that he moved from Ireland to England in the 1500 to 1600 year time frame and changed his surname to Kersey (an English surname) to hide his Irish ancestry; 4A) we only have 75 Casey testers from the United States - none from any of the other English colonies and no Caseys from Ireland have tested to date. I will pay for a 37 marker test for any Casey that has his Casey ancestry back to 1850 and would allow me to continue to extensively test our first Irish Casey tester.

5) We have a couple of surprise adoption/out of wedlock non-Caseys. One is a Hanvey, he already knew via YDNA testing that his line prior to 1830 all match Hanveys and all of his line post 1830s only match our Caseys. His Hanvey family also received property from a Casey probate record as well that matches the time frame of the genetic change. We also have a Meredith adopted line (living in Virginia in 1810).

6) We have a very strong YSTR branch (quite rare), half of our Casey have one value and half have another value, so we now know an early branch. I had been researching around five Casey lines in great depth (200 pages), four belonged to my STR branch but one did not belong to my branch. So, I now less interested in this fifth line but more interested in more Casey lines that are more closely related to my branch.

Eventually, we know that all 50 lines will eventually be separated over the next five to ten years. Until two years ago, L226 was my most recent YSNP branch, we just discovered our 46th branch recently and adding a new branch every couple of weeks these days. Under L226, we now have 65 NGS tests ($575 each). Around six months ago, we helped FTDNA design a L226 only SNP pack test that tests 40 branches plus another 100 YSNPs that are private or equivalent YSNPs. This test has been ordered 65 times (different lines than the NGS tests). Out of the 522 tested at 67 markers, almost 25 % have tested 40 to 45 branches. Due to this extensive testing, I can chart exactly how 80 % of these testers are connected. One-third of our L226 branches (15) are genealogically in nature (over 50 % one surname). We also know that YSNP branch Y5610 means that you are a direct descendant of King Brian Boru. We also know that L226 is Dal gCais in origin since the majority of testers have Dal gCais surnames and 80 % lived in five counties in Munster, Ireland.
Casey - Tipperary or Clare, Ireland
Kelly - Ireland
Brooks, Bryan, Shelton (2), Harper, Williamson - England
Tucker, Arrington, Stevenson, Shears, Jarvis - England
Hill (2), Reed, Olliff, Jackson, Potter, Cruse, Charlton - England
Davis. Martin, Ellison, Woodward, Alderson - England
Pace - Shropshire, England
Revier - Netherlands
Messer - Germany
Wininger - Switzerland

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Offline mariaf

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Re: Butler family
« Reply #11 on: Thursday 01 June 17 09:29 BST (UK) »
Hi Maggie Moon, I don't know whether this will help. My great grandfather was Thomas Butler born 1866 at a farm called 'Blackstairs' Hollyford Ireland. When I googled it, I discovered that a Thomas Butler still lives there so it might well be a family name. ( Some of my relatives even visited the family). I also found some graves for Butlers nearby in the neighbouring county. It seems they have farmed there for a long time and produced lots of children who emigrated.
Do you have any more family names?
Maria

Offline Maggie moon

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Re: Butler family
« Reply #12 on: Thursday 01 June 17 11:15 BST (UK) »
Hi Maria,
That is very interesting ! The names I have are Thomas Butler born abt  1811 Ireland who's son was John Butler born 1827 Ireland ( he eventually immigrated to the USA and Canada. Going back-and-forth quite a bit between the two) He married Margaret Harrington then Sarah Kane .. He had  children with the two wives:
 Ellen, Thomas Patric Butler, Michael , and and Bridget .
Thank you
Maggie

Offline mariaf

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Re: Butler family
« Reply #13 on: Saturday 03 June 17 12:58 BST (UK) »
Hi Maggie,
Do you have access to roots Ireland?
I had 50 free searches when it was new. I found lots of relatives on it.
It has transcriptions from parish registers from most counties.
But now it costs.
Maria