Author Topic: Florence Cartwright -Robert Dines (Dynes)  (Read 5050 times)

Offline henery

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Re: Florence Cartwright -Robert Dines (Dynes)
« Reply #27 on: Tuesday 29 January 13 16:37 GMT (UK) »
Hi Sarah
Thanks for providing further information on Florence Dines nee Cartwright. The info you have given ties in with research into her family history. Florence was sister to my wife's Aunt Annie Elizabeth Jenkins nee Cartwright.
When gathering details for the construction of a Family Tree I became intrigued by references to a Robert Dines who died in an aircrash. This is the crash you refer to in your message. I had originally been following a trail where Florence had married a soldier who became a casualty in WW1. This man 'Wilfrid Holden' born in Belper, Derbyshire was Florence's cousin and first husband. The details you have provided confirms Florence's second marriage which also ended in tragedy with the death of Robert Dines. I have been unable to find details of Florence's marriage to Robert so that is a blank area in my research into her life. Also date of death and where. I wonder do you have this info?
Thank you for your kind offer to provide a photo of Florence. In return, if you have an interest, I can forward a photo of Florence's sister Annie with husband John Jenkins. We are warned by the regulator to forward any personal details or email address by private message. To carry this out you have to send three separate messages, of which you have already sent one. If you acknowledge this message twice you should be in position to use the facility.
Regards
Henery
Green,Price,Burt,Jenkins,Dines,Hobbs,Rhodes,Herring,Couch,Walter,Hopkins,Coten,Deacon,Spencer

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Offline SDines

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Re: Florence Cartwright -Robert Dines (Dynes)
« Reply #28 on: Wednesday 30 January 13 02:34 GMT (UK) »
Hi Henery,
A short reply. I believe Florence died in Swanage, Dorset some time between 1962 and 1968. I will ask my sister and let you know.
Cheers,
Sarah

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Offline goldback81

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Re: Florence Cartwright -Robert Dines (Dynes)
« Reply #29 on: Friday 25 May 18 20:53 BST (UK) »
I am a teacher at Dartford Grammar School in Kent, England, and I have been researching the pupils from the school who fought during World War I.

Robert Imrie Dines was a pupil at the school, as was his brother, and so I have some information for you about them based on sources at the school such as the admissions register and the school magazine. I also have a photo of each of them.

Captain Robert Imrie Dines
R.I. Dines was born on 27/07/1894. His father was Henry R. Dines who was a bank manager in Dartford High Street. The family lived in the High Street in Dartford. He attended DGS from 1908 to 1912. He was a member of the OTC (Officers Training Corps) from its creation in 1909 until 1912 and was ranked as a Corporal. After leaving he worked as a bank clerk. He enlisted in the West Kent Yeomanry on 04/08/1914. He was gazetted as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 10th London Regiment on 14/07/1915; in this regiment he would have served alongside another Old Dartfordian named Captain Arthur Scrivener - an old school friend. He served in Suvla Bay in Gallipoli from August 1915 until the campaign was called off in late December / early January 1916. He then served in Egypt against the Senussi and then in the Sinai Peninsula. He transferred to the RAF whilst in Egypt in October 1916. He then served on the Western Front as an observer and then as a pilot from 1916 to 1918. He was wounded twice.

Lieutenant Henry George Dines
Known as “George.” H. George Dines was born on 20/10/1891. He attended DGS from 1908 to 1911. He was a member of the OTC from 1909 to 1911, ranked Colour Sergeant. He was a school prefect from 1909. After leaving he worked at an engineering works. He studied at the University of London. He enlisted in the Royal Navy Divisional Engineers on 18/09/1914. He served at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, in 1915 and wrote a letter to the school describing his experience; this was printed in the school magazine (transcript below). He was wounded twice, including May 1915. He was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Engineers (Tunnelling) on 15/04/1916. He married Edith Dorothy Connell on 27/12/1916 in Guildford, Surrey. He served on the Western Front from 1916 to 1918. Served at the Hohenzollern Redoubt near Loos. Wounded in 1918. Demobilised in 1919. After the war he went back to the Royal School of Mines. He died in Surrey in 1964.

The boys' father, Henry R. Dines, was also a school governor. During the war he became a member of the local committee that decided who in Dartford would be conscripted for military service and who would not. Since many teachers at the school were sent off to fight by the committee this obviously meant there was a difficult relationship between the head and his governors, such as Dines.

Dave Barrett

Offline goldback81

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Re: Florence Cartwright -Robert Dines (Dynes)
« Reply #30 on: Friday 25 May 18 20:54 BST (UK) »
Henry George Dines's letter from Gallipoli:

H. George Dines, Royal Naval Division Divisional Engineers, “A Baptism of Fire.”
Number Two Company were cheering us off. When we got about a hundred yards from the land, we heard spent bullets whizzing all about us, and dropping in the sea. However, we landed safely, and marched along the beach, passing water waggons, guns, stores, mules and men at various kinds of work. Red Cross men were bringing in the wounded, and at one place a row of graves with wooden crosses, made of packing-case wood, was seen. The steep hills were covered with scrub, between which were numerous holes in which were men’s kits, and men sitting smoking. We came to a place where holes had evidently been evacuated, although they contained numerous articles of clothing, toilet things, letters, photographs of girls, families, and friends, lying about anywhere.

Here we halted, and waited, a few seconds; then there was a shriek, and a very loud bang, as the shrapnel burst just over, coming preciously near some of us. We were told to take cover in these empty holes, and in less time than you can think we were in them, but not before at least two more shells had burst over us. About six or eight shells in all burst overhead doing no damage, as the slopes of the hill were too steep for the enemy to get his shells to burst exactly on the hillside. Then we all got picks, and dug ourselves in deeper, and sat there listening to the shells bursting overhead, and dropping in the sea beyond. We then had tea in our holes, and afterwards got ready to turn in.

Two battalions of infantry passed going up to the trenches in the evening. They were not so cheerful as the men we had passed on our way up, who had given us a welcome, and cheered us with witty remarks about how things were going. Number Two Company came on shore near us about ten o’clock. That night the battleships bombarded a fort. The flash seemed to light up everything, and the shells bursting sent up showers of red sparks, as good as any fireworks.

At last we turned into our holes, and went to sleep, listening to the whizzing and whining of stray bullets passing over us. I was awakened by a terrific shriek, and a terrific bang. I sat up, and another shell went over, and burst just beyond our holes. Then there was a terrific bombardment with shrieking and banging until about thirty shells had burst over us, with the result that one man had his rifle butt broken. I went to sleep again after that (at which I was rather surprised), and in place of reveille we were awakened by a terrific cannonading by HMS… (censored) which was near.

In the morning, our section built a small stone jetty… (censored), and were very near some shrapnel fire, while the remainder of our Company, with Number Two Company, started on a road up the steep hills. Both Companies worked on the road in the afternoon, and intended to get in to tea. An officer of another corps said, “It can’t be done by to-night in time.” Our Colonel said, “Leave it to my men.” At five, a message was sent to our holes to keep tea until seven. At seven, a party went down to fetch tea up the hill, and the road was quite done by half-past eight. Forty of our men went down, and fetched an eighteen-pounder field gun, and lugged it up. The artillery men saw their gun going, and came and helped, so the gun came up at the double, and at ten o’clock it was firing away. Before eleven, three guns were up. We were congratulated all round.

I hope that you find this interesting!
Thanks for the extra information you have managed to gather about Robert - such a shame he died so young without getting to know his son.

Dave Barrett