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Author Topic: A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA  (Read 26728 times)

Offline Valda

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA
« Reply #9 on: Saturday 18 June 11 13:51 BST (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA




OTHER USEFUL WEBSITES (for both churchyards and cemeteries)



FIRST AND SECOND WORLD WAR MILITARY GRAVES


COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION has an online database for those who died in the two World Wars some of whom have gravestones in the country.

THE WAR GRAVES PHOTOGRAPHIC PROJECT works in association with the CWGC photographing gravestones.

LEST WE FORGET  also has photographs and transcriptions of some war memorials. 




VOLUNTEER WEBSITES


FREEREG where volunteers transcribe registers and place them online. Coverage of Anglican registers for the London area is sparse.


A number of gravestones in churchyards and cemeteries within the London area have been photographed and indexed on GRAVESTONE PHOTOGRAPHIC RESOURCE 


Find a Grave coverage for GREATER LONDON though some entries for churchyards and cemeteries in areas of ESSEX, KENT and SURREY that became part of the county of London either in 1889 or more particularly in 1965 might be listed under those counties headings. Find a Grave is a worldwide website with coverage for the whole of England now above 9,000 entries.





Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA
« Reply #10 on: Saturday 18 June 11 14:06 BST (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA





FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETIES AND PUBLICATIONS




HILLINGDON FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY has published indexes of burial registers and monumental inscriptions on CD and microfiche


LONDON WESTMINSTER AND MIDDLESEX FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY has published some indexes of burial registers and monumental inscriptions on CD and microfiche


WEST MIDDLESEX FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY offers searches in their monumental inscription index and some individual parish church indexes (Feltham, Hammersmith, Hampton Wick, Harlington, Harmondsworth, Hayes, Hillingdon, Isleworth, Norwood Green and Stanwell).



THE EAST OF LONDON FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY has published some indexes – follow the link for store. The area of interest link gives further details on parishes and cemeteries in east London.


WALTHAM FOREST FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY


Information on the privately held ESSEX BURIAL INDEX 1813-1865



NORTH WEST KENT FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY has published indexes and transcripts of burial registers and monumental inscriptions on CD.


WOOLWICH AND DISTRICT FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY



EAST SURREY FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY has published indexes and transcripts of burial registers and monumental inscriptions on CDs and microfiches.


WEST SURREY FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY has published transcripts of church registers and monumental inscriptions (including some cemeteries) and offer searches in their monumental inscriptions index. Surrey burials on CD and MICROFICHE (includes City of London burial registers) PARISH REGISTER PUBLICATIONS on microfiche MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTION search and MICROFICHES of monumental inscriptions published by the society.   

 





Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk


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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA
« Reply #11 on: Saturday 18 June 11 14:46 BST (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA





NONCONFORMIST BURIAL REGISTERS AND BURIAL GROUNDS




The word non-conformist refers to any group that does not conform to the state church established in the sixteenth century, the Church of England sometimes known as the Anglican Church.

At the start of civil registration in 1837 the government reached an agreement with most nonconformist churches. If the churches deposited their registers, in return they would be recognised as legal documents. Most Christian churches except the Catholics deposited their records, with the Quakers (the Society of Friends) first making copies. The few Huguenot (French Protestant) and Lutheran (German Protestant) churches which had churchyards deposited their registers. Jewish synagogues kept their own records. The deposited non-conformist records are held in series RG4 (Registrar General) at The National Archives. A second smaller deposit of records was made in 1855. These records are held in series RG8. This explains why many earlier nonconformist records are held at The National Archives with only microfilmed copies of nonconformist registers at local record offices. Most of these records have been indexed on the IGI (International Genealogical Index/Family Search) the index created by the Church of the Latter Day Saints. The registers not indexed on the IGI, were the burials and the Quaker records.
Indexes and the images for all the registers are now online at BMD REGISTERS and THE GENEALOGIST

The National Archives GUIDE to nonconformist records. 

Full list of church registers and separate non-conformist burial grounds in RG4 and RG8





NON-CONFORMIST BURIAL GROUND REGISTERS HELD AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND ONLINE



See the previously given link to RG4 and RG8 for the full list of surviving non-conformist churchyard registers held at The National Archives. Listed here are only some of the larger burial grounds.



Bethnal Green Protestant Dissenters' Burying Ground, (Gibraltar Row) Bethnal Green E2 (1793-1837)
Bunhill Fields Burial Ground, City Road, Islington, EC1 (1713-1853)
Findmypast has an INDEX for Bunhill Fields Burial Ground 1788-1853
MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS for Bunhill Fields Burial Ground in 1869 and interment order books 1789-1854 are held at the Guildhall Library 
Bunhill Fields Burial Ground: proceedings in reference to its preservation, with inscriptions on the tombs published 1867 ONLINE
History of the Bunhill Fields Burial Ground, with some of the Principal Inscriptions published 1902 ONLINE


Golden Lane Burial Ground, (The City Bunhill Burial Ground), Golden Lane, Islington, EC1 (1833-1853)
Findmypast has an INDEX for Golden Lane Burial Ground 1833-1853


New Gravel Pit Burial Ground, Chatham Place, Hackney, E9 (1812-1908?)
Monumental inscriptions (1801-1850) are held by HACKNEY ARCHIVES 


South London Burial Ground, East Street, Walworth, SE17 (1819-1837)


Southwark New Burial Ground, New Street, St John’s Horsleydown, Southwark SE1 (1821-1854)


Spa Fields Burial Ground, Northampton Road, Clerkenwell, EC1 (1778-1849)
The National Burial Index 1795-1849 and Findmypast has an INDEX for Spa Fields Burial Ground 1778-1849


St Thomas Square Burial Ground, Mare Street, Hackney, E8 (1787-1876) 
Monumental inscriptions (1787-1850) are held by HACKNEY ARCHIVES
 





Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA
« Reply #12 on: Saturday 18 June 11 14:56 BST (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA




NONCONFORMIST BURIAL REGISTERS AND BURIAL GROUNDS



Some non-conformist churches had churchyards. Non-conformists were either buried in their churchyard if that was possible, the local Anglican churchyard or in a larger separate non-conformist burial ground like Bunhill Fields. The records for non-conformist churches and non-conformist burial grounds do not always have a good rate of survival. Once the large civic cemeteries began to be built, largely from the 1840s onwards, most non-conformist burials were increasingly in those cemeteries. The upkeep of the older non-conformist burial grounds in central London was often beyond the resources of their chapels and they were either sold to private speculators, fell into disrepair and disappeared, or as in the case of larger burial grounds like Spa Fields had become parks by the end of the C19th.


By the late 18th century the London churchyards were becoming overcrowded. New cemeteries were established as private speculations generally offering slightly lower charges for burials than the churchyards. Some of these burial grounds were originally connected to chapels adjoining them, but were subsequently bought by private individuals. By 1835 there were at least fourteen such burial grounds in London including Spa Fields, Clerkenwell, opposite London Metropolitan Archives where about 80,000 people were buried. An enquiry in 1843 discovered that about 40 burials were taking place each day. The bodies were exhumed at night and burned in a bone house to make space for more burials. Similar conditions existed at Globe Fields Burial Ground, Mile End.

Quoted from the London Metropolitan GUIDE to Cemetery Records



East Hill later known as Mount Nod burial ground (1680-1854) East Hill, Wandsworth SW18
No registers seem to have survive but monumental inscriptions were copied in 1886 and printed in the Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of London volume 1
THE HUGUENOT SOCIETY
This burial ground was not established by Huguenots though historically it has become associated with them. Many none Huguenot burials also took place there as well as Huguenot burials.

 



NONCONFORMIST BURIAL REGISTERS IN LOCAL ARCHIVES



There are some non-conformist burial registers deposited at the London Metropolitan Archives. These registers 1694-1921 can be found on ANCESTRY
A GUIDE to non-conformist records at the London Metropolitan Archives and NON-ANGLICAN REGISTER TRANSCRIPTS
 

Registers at the LMA include for example


NEW OR LITTLE BUNHILL FIELDS BURIAL GROUND, Church Street, Islington N1 (1831-1853)
Previously the graveyard of the Upper Street Independent Chapel, by the 1850s it was managed by a private company.



Westminster Archives GUIDE to non-conformist registers deposited at Westminster Archives.


Essex Record Office holds deposited non-conformist registers for the areas of Essex which became part of Greater London in 1965. You can search for these registers on SEAX.


Online CATALOGUE for Surrey archives


The GUIDE on the Rootschat London and Middlesex boards to London Archives and useful information leaflets lists all the 32 London borough archives and gives the link to their websites. Many though not all have either online indexes or lists of the registers and indexes they hold. 

 






Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA
« Reply #13 on: Saturday 18 June 11 15:13 BST (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA







NONCONFORMIST BURIAL REGISTERS AND BURIAL GROUNDS




ROMAN CATHOLIC REGISTERS



Catholic Church registers may remain with the church. The registers are not usually deposited with county record offices but in the relevant Catholic diocesan archives.

The National Archives guide to CATHOLIC records. 


THE CATHOLIC FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY   


THE CATHOLIC NATIONAL LIBRARY at Farnborough Abbey holds some transcripts of burial registers


The Catholic Westminster Diocesan ARCHIVIST and a list of deposited registers (Family history and the archives pdf file) for coverage of the City of London and Middlesex
The Westminster PARISH DIRECTORY

Copies of Catholic registers held at WESTMINSTER ARCHIVES


The Catholic Southwark Diocesan ARCHIVIST for coverage of the London areas of former north Surrey and Kent. The Southwark PARISH DIRECTORY


The Catholic Brentwood Diocesan ARCHIVIST for coverage of the London areas of former west Essex. The Brentwood PARISH DIRECTORY

Essex Record Office holds deposited Catholic Church registers which you can search for on SEAX.



All Souls Roman Catholic Burial-ground, Cadogan Terrace, Chelsea SW3, burial records for 1845-1858 are indexed on the National Burial Index. A TRANSCRIPT of the registers is published by the London Westminster and Middlesex Family History Society   


See under the London borough listings for details of Catholic cemeteries in Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Richmond-upon-Thames and Waltham Forest.





JEWISH CEMETERY REGISTERS



THE INTERNATIONAL JEWISH CEMETERY PROJECT gives extremely thorough information about each Jewish cemetery and where records can be found. Consequently apart from those with an online database (see below) Jewish cemeteries are not listed in this guide.


An online DATABASE for some Jewish cemeteries
Balls Pond Road Cemetery (Kingsbury Road Cemetery) Kingsbury Road, Balls Pond Road, Dalston, Hackney N1 (1842-1937)
Silver Street Cemetery (Cheshunt Cemetery), Silver Street, Goffs Oak, Cheshunt, Broxbourne, Hertfordshire EN7 (1964-1998)
Edgwarebury Cemetery, Edgwarebury Lane, Harrow HA8 (1976-2006)
Edmonton Cemetery, Montagu Road, Angel Road, Lower Edmonton, Enfield N18 (1927-1955)
Hoop Lane Cemetery, Hoop Lane, Golders Green, Barnet NW11 (1897-2006)
Mile End – Nuevo or Novo (New) Beth Chaim Cemetery, 320 Mile End Road, Tower Hamlets E1 (1733-1918)
Rainham Jewish Cemetery, Upminster Road North, Havering RM13 (1930-1946)


CEMETERY SCRIBES have photographs of headstone inscriptions from Jewish cemeteries.








 
Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA
« Reply #14 on: Saturday 18 June 11 15:24 BST (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA






CIVIC CEMETERIES


BACKGROUND INFORMATION



Records for civic cemeteries interments are mostly held by the London boroughs or by a few private companies which manage these cemeteries.

A useful timeline on the HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF CEMETERIES IN ENGLAND explains the context in which cemeteries and later crematoriums developed in this country.


With the closing of churchyards in urban areas many families could not afford the expense of a cemetery plot, let alone a gravestone. Such burials would be in common graves which contained other unrelated interments. Burial in a common grave was not synonymous with a pauper funeral. It did not mean the funeral itself was not paid for by the family. TYPES OF GRAVES IN THE CEMETERY, though not from a cemetery in London, is very helpful in explaining the difference between the possible types of common, pauper and private graves.

Cemetery burial registers usually give the name of the deceased, age, abode and occupation, the date of death and of burial, and the position of the grave. These records are arranged chronologically, and are not indexed alphabetically, though some cemeteries may have some computerised indexes. If a private grave was purchased those records indicate who purchased the plot, their address, when it was purchased and whether a gravestone was erected (though not whether it survives). The records will also indicate who else was buried in the plot, when and at what depths. The plot number indicates where in the cemetery the grave is located, essential knowledge when trying to find a grave in a large cemetery.

Cremations became increasingly common after the Second World War when more crematoriums were opened. Cemeteries with crematoriums keep separate burial and cremation registers. Not all London boroughs manage crematoriums in their areas. A search for a burial or cremation may require a wider search which could include adjacent boroughs and counties.

In a large and growing metropolis like London people were not always buried in their local cemetery though there were often arrangements between specific cemeteries to bury those from certain agreed geographical areas.  Cemeteries vied with each other for institutional burials since, though they were pauper burials, they represented a constant income for each cemetery.

Brookwood cemetery in Woking twenty-five miles from central London nevertheless had major contracts with London poor law unions and their workhouses. They buried paupers from Bermondsey, Chiswick, Bloomsbury, St Giles in the Fields, Chelsea, Deptford, Holborn, Soho, St John and St Margaret Westminster and St Saviours Southwark.
The cemetery was also popular choice for many families in London who chose to bury family members there travelling out to Woking on the cemetery’s own TRAIN SERVICE.
 
Brookwood Cemetery (London Necropolis), Cemetery Pales, Woking GU24 (1854) presently owned by BROOKWOOD CEMETERY
The burial registers 1854-1976 and deed of grant books 1854-1971 are held at SURREY HISTORY CENTRE
In 1917 BROOKWOOD MILITARY CEMETERY was established at Brookwood Cemetery for armed service personnel who died in the London area from wounds received on the Western Front, of sickness or in training accidents. The cemetery was extended for the burial of Second World War casualties.
THE BROOKWOOD CEMETERY SOCIETY
 

Some of the older London cemeteries have been neglected over the years and the gravestones have been degraded by pollution, general age and the growth of trees and undergrowth. This neglect has meant some, or sections of some cemeteries are now designated nature reserves. NUNHEAD cemetery in Southwark is one such example.

Descriptions of some individual London cemeteries can also be found at LONDON GARDENS ONLINE with MAPS for some London boroughs showing their locations.
 
Photographs and information for some cemeteries at LONDON CEMETERIES. An internet search via a search engine like Google will often find further photographs and information on websites like Wikipedia.
 
 






Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA
« Reply #15 on: Saturday 18 June 11 15:32 BST (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA






CIVIC CEMETERIES



THE GEOGRAPHY OF LONDON - LOCAL AUTHORITY ADMINISTRATION IN LONDON



The present 32 London boroughs plus the City of London are the local administrations which manage the majority of London’s civic cemeteries. Greater London today is just over 300 square kilometres in size with a population of at least 7 million.

The establishment of a growing railway system in the 1830s allowed for the possibility of daily commuting and greatly accelerated the growth of the urban spread around the City of London (now often termed the square mile). In 1855 the unelected Metropolitan Board of Works was established to provide the basic infrastructure for services for the metropolitan area, excluding the City of London which the Corporation of London administered. The board operated in parts of the counties of east Middlesex, north Kent and Surrey which had been selected by the General Register Office as ‘the Metropolis’ for the purposes of mortality statistics. In 1889 these were the areas that became part of what were eventually the 28 metropolitan boroughs (formed in 1900) of the County of London. A MAP of the 28 metropolitan boroughs

In 1965 further areas surrounding London, virtually the whole of Middlesex, larger areas of north Kent and Surrey and parts of east Essex and a smaller area of south Hertfordshire became part of the newly formed Greater London.
In 1965 Staines and Sunbury were transferred from Middlesex to Surrey. In 1974 these areas became part of the new Surrey borough of SPELTHORNE.  A MAP of the present day 32 London boroughs


THE BRITISH TOWNS AND VILLAGES NETWORK website is very useful in helping to navigate a map of modern day London, showing the individual places within each London borough.
 
The London Metropolitan Archives GUIDE to areas in Greater London Boroughs is useful in helping find where places are in which London borough today.


Use the website FUNERAL MAP to help with locating present day cemeteries and crematoriums in the area and then use this guide for further information and contact details for the local authority or company which manages them.





Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA
« Reply #16 on: Saturday 18 June 11 15:42 BST (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA






CIVIC CEMETERIES




THE GEOGRAPHY OF LONDON - LOCAL AUTHORITY ADMINISTRATION IN LONDON



LONDON BOROUGHS FORMERLY IN MIDDLESEX


By 1900 the areas of historic Middlesex (north of the river Thames) now part of the County of London were the metropolitan boroughs of



BETHNAL GREEN

CHELSEA

FINSBURY
(Charterhouse, Clerkenwell, Glasshouse Yard, St Luke, St Sepulchre)

FULHAM
(Parsons Green, Sands End, Walham Green, West Kensington)

HACKNEY
(Clapton, Dalston, Homerton, Kingsland)

HAMMERSMITH
(Old Oak Common, Shepherd’s Bush, Wormwood Scrubs)

HAMPSTEAD
(Belsize Park, Hampstead Heath, Kilburn, Primrose Hill)

HOLBORN
(Bloomsbury, Ely Place and Rents, Hatton Gardens, Lincoln and Staples Inn Saffron Hill, St Giles in the Fields)

ISLINGTON
(Archway, Barnsbury, Canonbury, Highbury, Holloway, Pentonville, Tufnell Park)

KENSINGTON
(Brompton, Earls Court, Kensal Green, Notting Hill)

PADDINGTON
(Bayswater, Maida Hill and Vale, Westbourne Green, West Kilburn)

POPLAR
(Bow, Blackwall, Bromley by St Leonard, Isle of Dogs)

ST MARYLEBONE
(Lisson Grove, Regent’s Park, St John’s Wood)

ST PANCRAS
(Camden Town, Euston, Kentish Town, Kings Cross, Somers Town, Tottenham Court Road)

SHOREDITCH
(Haggerston, Hoxton)

STEPNEY
(Limehouse, Mile End Old and New Town, Norton Folgate, Old Artillery Ground, Ratcliff, St George in the East, Shadwell, Spitalfields, Tower of London, Wapping, Whitechapel)

STOKE NEWINGTON
(South Hornsey)

WESTMINSTER
(Belgravia, Clement Danes, Covent Garden, Hyde Park, Liberty of Rolls, Mayfair, Pimlico, St George Hanover Square, St James,  St John and St Margaret, St Martin in the Fields, Savoy, Soho, The Strand)



In 1965 almost all areas of the county of Middlesex became part of Greater London forming the fifteen modern London boroughs of



BARNET
The urban districts and municipal boroughs of Finchley, Friern Barnet and Hendon from Middlesex and Barnet and East Barnet from Hertfordshire

BRENT
The municipal boroughs of Wembley and Willesden from Middlesex

CAMDEN
The metropolitan boroughs of Hampstead, Holborn and St Pancras

CITY OF WESTMINSTER
The metropolitan boroughs of Paddington, St Marylebone and Westminster

EALING
The municipal boroughs of Acton, Ealing and Southall from Middlesex

ENFIELD
The municipal boroughs of Edmonton, Enfield and Southgate from Middlesex

HACKNEY
The metropolitan boroughs of Hackney, Shoreditch and Stoke Newington

HAMMERSMITH AND FULHAM
The metropolitan boroughs of Fulham and Hammersmith

HARINGEY
The municipal boroughs of Hornsey, Tottenham and Wood Green from Middlesex

HARROW
The municipal borough of Harrow from Middlesex

HILLINGDON
The urban districts and municipal borough of Hayes and Harlington, Ruislip-Northwood, Yiewsley and West Drayton and Uxbridge from Middlesex

HOUNSLOW
The urban districts of Brentford and Chiswick, Feltham, Heston and Isleworth from Middlesex

ISLINGTON
The metropolitan boroughs of Finsbury and Islington

KENSINGTON AND CHELSEA
The metropolitan boroughs of Chelsea and Kensington

TOWER HAMLETS
The metropolitan boroughs of Bethnal Green, Poplar and Stepney
 







Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA
« Reply #17 on: Saturday 18 June 11 15:50 BST (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN THE LONDON AREA




CIVIC CEMETERIES



THE GEOGRAPHY OF LONDON - LOCAL AUTHORITY ADMINISTRATION IN LONDON



LONDON BOROUGHS FORMERLY IN ESSEX


In 1965 areas of the county of Essex became part of Greater London forming five modern London boroughs.


BARKING AND DAGENHAM
The municipal boroughs of Barking and Dagenham (most) from Essex

HAVERING
The urban district of Hornchurch and the municipal borough of Havering from Essex

NEWHAM
The county boroughs of East and West Ham, and a small area of the municipal borough of Barking from Essex and North Woolwich from the metropolitan borough of Woolwich formerly in Kent

REDBRIDGE
The municipal boroughs of Ilford, Wanstead and Woodford, a part of the municipal borough of Dagenham and a part of the urban district of Chigwell from Essex

WALTHAM FOREST
The municipal boroughs of Chingford, Leyton and Waltham from Essex




LONDON BOROUGHS FORMERLY IN KENT


By 1900 the areas of historic Kent (south of the river Thames) now part of the County of London were the metropolitan boroughs of


DEPTFORD (Brockley, New Cross)

GREENWICH (Charlton, Kidbrooke)

LEWISHAM (Lee)

WOOLWICH (Eltham, Plumstead)



In 1965 more areas of the county of Kent became part of Greater London forming four modern London boroughs.


BEXLEY
The municipal borough of Bexley and Erith and the urban districts of Chislehurst and Sidcup (part) and Cray from Kent

BROMLEY
The municipal boroughs of Beckenham and Bromley and the urban districts of Penge and Orpington as well as Chislehurst from Kent

GREENWICH
The metropolitan boroughs of Greenwich and Woolwich except for North Woolwich which became part of the London borough of Newham

LEWISHAM
The metropolitan boroughs of Deptford and Lewisham




LONDON BOROUGHS FORMERLY IN SURREY


By 1900 the areas of historic Surrey (south of the river Thames) now part of the County of London were the metropolitan boroughs of


BATTERSEA

BERMONDSEY (Rotherhithe, St John Horsleydown, St Olave and St Thomas)

CAMBERWELL (Dulwich, Nunhead, Peckham)

LAMBETH (Brixton, Herne Hill, Kennington, Norwood, Stockwell, Tulse Hill, Vauxhall)

SOUTHWARK (Christchurch, Newington)

WANDSWORTH (Clapham, Putney, Streatham, Tooting Graveney)



In 1965 more areas of the county of Surrey became part of Greater London forming eight modern London boroughs


CROYDON
The urban district of Coulsdon and Purley and the county borough of Croydon from Surrey

KINGSTON UPON THAMES
The municipal boroughs of Kingston-upon-Thames, Malden and Coombe and Surbiton from Surrey

LAMBETH
The metropolitan borough of Lambeth and the areas of Clapham, Streatham and Tooting formerly in the metropolitan borough of Wandsworth

MERTON
The municipal boroughs and urban district of Merton and Morden, Mitcham and Wimbledon from Surrey

RICHMOND UPON THAMES
The municipal boroughs of Twickenham from Middlesex and Barnes and Richmond from Surrey

SOUTHWARK
The metropolitan boroughs of Bermondsey, Camberwell and Southwark

SUTTON
The municipal boroughs and urban district of Beddington and Wallington, Carshalton and Sutton and Cheam from Surrey

WANDSWORTH
The metropolitan boroughs of Battersea and Wandsworth







Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk