Author Topic: St. Mary Newington – Seeking an expert  (Read 2846 times)

Offline YH757

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St. Mary Newington – Seeking an expert
« on: Sunday 06 September 09 12:01 BST (UK) »
Greetings

I am looking for clues as to why an ancestor of mine who lived and died in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk would have married in St. Mary Newington, Surrey.

His occupation was Mariner, Fisherman, Fish Curer, or Fish Merchant.  I suspect he was all of these.

I have heard that there were “Fishmonger’s Almshouses” in the parish.

Was there a major fish market or fish landing dock in the area?

His bride was significantly younger than he and his late wife’s niece.  She was also from Yarmouth, a “beatster” or mender of nets.

LOCK’S FIELDS
The abode for both is given as “Lock’s Fields” and this was in October 1848.  What was Lock’s Fields and does it have significance to fishmongers or to people not permanently resident in the parish?

Any knowledge or help out there please. 
Balls (Great Yarmouth), Cal[l]f (Great yarmouth),  Johnson(Swineshead, Lincs'), Liversidge (Darnall, Sheffield),  Finner (Ireland, Dublin)

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Offline Valda

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Re: St. Mary Newington – Seeking an expert
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 06 September 09 13:44 BST (UK) »
Hi

Newington is in Southwark

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newington,_London

A parish map showing Southwark and Newington in relation to the river Thames which is Southwark's northern boundary

http://www.eastsurreyfhs.org.uk/parishes/parish_map.htm

Newington is in the southern part of Southwark with no boundary onto the river Thames. Southwark is someway from  the Thames estuary and opposite the square mile of the City of London north of the Thames.

A map in 1837 showing Locks Fields

http://archivemaps.com/mapco/cary1837/cary44.htm


'Since the commencement of the present century a considerable advance has been made in the way of buildings in this neighbourhood, particularly on the east side of the Walworth Road. Lock's Fields, formerly a dreary swamp, and Walworth Common, which was at one time an open field, have been covered with houses. In Paragon Row the Fishmongers' Company have erected several model dwellings, with the aim of benefiting a very poor locality. The dwellings have been built on the "flat" system, realising as nearly as possible the idea of the cottage character, and replacing old and dilapidated houses of an inferior class.'

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=45280

The Fishmonger's almhouses were built by the City of London guild

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65445#s2

...'at the corner of St. George's Road, stood for many years, down till the year 1851, a picturesque cluster of almshouses belonging to the Fishmongers' Company. There were two separate buildings. One, St. Peter's Hospital, was built by the company in 1615–18; the other, due to the munificence of Mr. James Hulbert, a liveryman, dated its erection from 1719. These almshouses were quaint, old-fashioned, quadrangular piles of building, of Gothic architecture, with mullioned windows; they were enclosed by low walls, and in part surrounded by patches of garden-ground, sunk below the roadway. They appear to have been, from the first, in part supported by a voluntary appropriation, by the Company of Fishmongers, of a portion of the revenues of Sir Thomas Kneseworth's estate; but the earliest benefaction which can be considered as a specific endowment, and which seems to have given occasion to the erection of the hospital, was that by Sir Thomas Hunt, who, "by will [April 26, 1615], gave out of his land in Kent (or Kentish) Street, Southwark, £20 a year to the poor of the Company of Fishmongers, on condition that the company should build an hospital, containing houses for six poor freemen, and to have the houses rent free, and a yearly sum of 40s. a-piece, to be paid quarterly; and every of them, on St. Thomas's Day, to have a gown of three yards of good cloth, of 8s. a yard, and also 6s. in money to make it up; that if any alms-man should die, and leave a wife, so long as she should continue a widow, she should have her dwelling free, but if she should marry, she should not tarry there; and 40s. and a yearly gown should go to some honest brother of the company, who should wear the gown at times convenient, with the donor's arms on it, and the dolphin at its top.'

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=45280



Do the details given on the marriage certificate support the baptism information you have from the Great Yarmouth parish registers?



Regards

Valda
Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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Offline YH757

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Re: St. Mary Newington – Seeking an expert
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 06 September 09 16:46 BST (UK) »
Valda

Thanks for your swift reply

I have amassed various pieces of evidence including census, death certificates and information on the bride’s subsequent marriages.

He would have been about 72 at the time of the marriage and she about 28, but the marriage certificate merely says “of full age” for both.  He is widower and she spinster, which would be correct.

They had one daughter – I could get her birth cert.

My thought that this marriage would be of dubious legality and the couple were in London rather than Yarmouth to hide the fact, but also thought that he might indeed have been there on business.

There appear to be other family members who were living in the Newington area or who later settled there.  One of these appears to be the bride’s illegitimate son from a few years earlier, who seems to have been adopted by this husband or have taken his name.

Balls (Great Yarmouth), Cal[l]f (Great yarmouth),  Johnson(Swineshead, Lincs'), Liversidge (Darnall, Sheffield),  Finner (Ireland, Dublin)