Author Topic: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN  (Read 9835 times)

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #27 on: Tuesday 10 April 18 20:40 BST (UK) »
 Hi  Shaun

 The word "Pikey"  i think its a much misused word that came to signify several ways of thinking, which one is right and where did it truly derive its origin, well from my research i will show you that so far i think it comes from the  County of Kent, the Garden of England, this as everything todo with the Gipsy People, like the word Pickey, Gipsy People have been labeled in several ways meaning several different kinds of people and meanings,  after a certain timescale meanings change as do people, in life everything evolves, maybe nothing at all stands still, these below are a few clues that i have been looking at regarding relating matters to the history of the Beeney Family, later in another post i will show you many examples of the People stated.

Kentish Gazette Tuesday 26 January 1869
EXTRACT
Kentish Words_ The word pikey is used exclusively in Kent. I never heard it elsewhere, it is commonly used there instead of the word Gipsy. During residence of a few months in west Kent, i became acquainted with some words that are new to me. For example, i was much puzzled when i seen a woman cry out in her garden. The skaydles got a bit o flick in her mouth ans arum under the slats. On inquiry was told that a skaydle is a thievish cat, flick is the hair of a rabbit or hare; and slats are thin, flat, untitled pea pods.

Cardiff Times Saturday 25 June 1898
Extract
Perhaps you are called a Romany Chal; whats that? he cried gazing at me from his staring eyes. A Gipsy isn't it? He grinned, well i believe iv some pikey blood in me. What do you meen by pikey Gipsy, said he. That must be a local term, said i, proberbly derived from the word turnpike, as connecting the Gipsies to the road.

Kentish Gazette 31 August 1847
Extract
Canterbury Races. These once great County meetings and annual holidays of four and five days duration, were feebly imitated and wretchedly burlesqued on Thursday and Friday last.....How unlike the Steward of olden times! when that all-essential functionary, booted and be-spurred, was keenly scrutinized from the observatory to the weighing room in admiring and breathless silence; and who, his duties completed, was greeted with smiling eyes, and radiant and blooming faces from the most exclusive coterie of the dazzling galaxy in the stands. These attractions, were in every respect wanting last week; and the steward and his friends, for lack of mere refitted occupation, repaired to the dark_eyed daughters of Egypt, the Pikeys of his classic orations, for consolations and amusement.

I have found several records where they state Gipsy and Pikey, as well as just saying Pikey instead of saying Gipsy, as in saying they are the same meanings, i have also read which i will show you where records say Gipsy or Pikey, then i found what i think is maybe a truer meaning from the 1400s, if true this will prove the word Pikey comes from a different time and meaning yet the origin of the word itself suited the peoples the word was first set out to describe, so as different people merged the word itself then came to be known as a word for all. To some degree i think every person today in Britain with Gipsy ancestry are descended from the Gipsies that came over from mainline Europe and the new invigorated local populations that survived the plague years, so words once used in certain ways to describe certain ways of people evolved also in the same was as people assimulated. I will show you next the record from the 1400s, i do not know the truth i am just trying to find the truth, then i will show you lots of records of your Relatives

to be continued....

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #28 on: Wednesday 11 April 18 21:03 BST (UK) »
Hi Shaun

  The next article is wrote in the newspaper below, it is about the accounts of the findings of Mr.C.G.Harper, 1863-1943, in his book "The Kentish Coast" 1914. I will at the end put on a link to the book itself, i will then tell you what page to read, Mr. Harper wrote some good informative books, i will put a list on at the end for further information about them.

Folkstone, Hythe, Sandgate & Chilton Herald
Saturday 12 March 1927

BY  ("Felix") "The Kentish Coast". This is the title of a volume written by Mr.C.G Harper and most interesting are its pleasant, and often amusing pages. We have often heard of the play of a single word. Take, for instance, Wye. Perhaps it may be traditions, but i have heard an irate railway passenger from Yorkshire, not acquainted with this part of the Country, how he enquired of a railway Porter, on the trains stopping at Wye, the name of the station. The courteous official replied "Wye Sir". Further said the Man from the North;
"Why becourse i want to know". The Porter is said to have replied again; " Wye Sir". There then followed quite a rangle and the Yorkshire man threatened to report the impudent Porter (as he thought) to the Station Master. However everything came right when it was explained to the stranger that Wye was the Place Name.
A Glimpse of Lydd in the Good Old Days. The way of transgressors is invariably hard, but appears it was very hard in Lydd in the distant past, as the following will prove.
 " That Ancient Chamberlains accounts of about 1475 show ", says the Author, misdemeanants had the very worst of times at Lydd. First we find it ordered that anyone found Cutting or Pikeying (Stealing) Purses or other goods of lytille value, be brought to the high strete and have their ere nayed to a post or cart whele; Then follows; " Paid for nayling of Thomas Norris ere 12d." There was a grim quality about the justice of those times. A knife was handed to the offender so that he might release himself by cutting of his ear whenever he chose. The term imprisonment therefore depended upon himself. Whether Thomas Norris was a " regular hand " or a first offender is not mentioned by the Author, but at any rate they had rough justice at Lydd in 1475. " The Kentish Coast" is Published by Messrs. Chapman and Hall.

So if i am reading the above article right in the Ancient Chamberlains Accounts of 1475 there is mention of the word Pickey as in steal as in pickeying as in stealing. Maybe this is how the word was first used, i do not know if this is how in Kent the word Pickey first came about, its a good bit of local history tho, in the book when quoting the old way of spelling it says " Cutting " is spelt " Cuttyng ". "Pickeying " is spelt " Pickeyng ". This is the Link to the Book below, turn to page 360. I think the whole book is very good.

 https://archive.org/details/kentishcoast00harprich

 I will put several records on the next page regarding this word Pikey plus the Peoples it mentions, then i will finish of this research with just records of your Relatives, i hope at the end of these writing i may have been of help to you in your research. Remember in that record i wrote about Henry Beney two pages back

South Eastern Gazette
12 July 1859
Kent

OBSTRUCTING THE ROAD _ Henry Beney, travelling horse dealer, vulgary termed " pickey", was charged with obstructing the roads in the town of Tunbridge.

well in 1859 they said then they thought the word as a vulgar one, this is evidence.
Below is the link to the Online Books by

Charles G. Harper
(Harper, Charles G. (Charles George), 1863-1943) 
some very interesting reading. 
http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Harper%2C%20Charles%20G%2E%20%28Charles%20George%29%2C%201863%2D1943


Shaun look on the two links below, you can check through the timelines, one is about the Black Death, the Plague that decimated the population of the country's of Europe and the other is a timeline of the stated movements of the Romany Gipsies, by 1407 it is wrote that the Gipsies are now in Germany, the plague was stated as fading out around 1353, it is evan wrote that in the years 1350/1400 the Gipsies were being welcomed, this was be course millions of workers were dead, the plague itself could also of been a factor by driving the Gipsies Westward out of Greece and Turkey, this all as to do with who the Gipsies of Britain are, that includes Familys like the Beeneys,

http://www.totallytimelines.com/the-black-death-1346-1353/

https://gypsiesroma.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/timeline-of-violence-against-of-gypsies.html

to be continued....

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #29 on: Sunday 15 April 18 12:36 BST (UK) »
Hi Shaun
 
I see through your writings that your relatives are also related to the Ripley's, when you do your research in the way i do, you will find so much more information, i will put up records for you, i have found a lot, with many names, Good Luck to you...there is no need for you to keep writing back just use the information i find to create a bigger picture, names trades locations, search through all the records and a thread will appear, this will guide you.This will be the last time i do a direct research for anybody, i have to finish my other researchers, or at least leave them for the next person in a right state. These records below are of great Historical Value also. Do you see how the two Absalom's alter the Beeney name, then the contradictions in the final two records are of great importance, there is several story's within each story, its knowing how to read them, that is the secret to all knowledge of the peoples i write about. I remember my Mother telling me all about the the Old Gipsies, do you know everything in every-way as turned out to be true, right from the Oldest of the Romany Gipsies who stayed more within themselves to Romany Gipsies who assimilated and created a bigger Family, you see the truth that binds them is in the records.
strangers have often wrote..." This type does that or that type goes on like this ". yet i have read records of all the Gipsy Family's of Britain. I will leave that with you.


 Hastings and St Leonard's Observer
Saturday 8 May 1875

Horses Straying. Absalom Beney, Mark Ripley, and Absalom Beany, three travelers with vans, pleaded guilty to having allowed their horse to stray in Pennell Road on Sunday. Superintendent Jeffery said it was a common offence with people of defendant’s class, all over the country. Defendant - “ We offered to pay anything as we came along to put our horses up, but nobody would take it ” Another defendant - “ Why don’t they refuse to give licenses ? When drove to it we could do something else ”. Defendants were fined Half-a- Crown each and licenses were made out.

Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser
Wednesday 6 November 1867

 A few days ago a man named Ripley, well known here as a hawker of Brushers, Chairs; to show that he had the most money of the company present, produced from his caravan a sack containing nine thousand Sovereigns! And also showed a bag full of Guineas, and another containing Crown Pieces; and his wife turned out £100 in loose Cash from her pocket. This wealthy couple are extremely ignorant, can neither read nor write, and have not the slightest faith in banks or any other investments.


In the Year 1900 Moses Ripley Strode like Goliath, this is his story...... so far.
Eastbourne Gazette
15 August
5/12 September
Dundee Evening Telegraph 4 September

The familiar story of Dick Whittington’s journey to London is called to mind by the experience of a North Sussex Lad named Moses Ripley, whilst patrolling his beat in Orchard Road in the early hours of Wednesday morning an Eastbourne Police Constable observed the Boy sleeping in one of the new hollows in the course of erection here, and like the original hero his only companion was a cat which he was nursing. Upon being awakened he was taken straight away to the Police Station at the Town Hall where he and his cat were secured, the boy said he had walked into Eastbourne from Crowborough, he had accomplished a distance of thirty miles in thirteen hours, the cat is a splendid specimen of the silver grey type, he had eaten all his food before he reached Eastbourne but is still possessed of his three pence a thought that seemed to give him pleasure. The little fellow left Crowborough for Eastbourne at Eight o’clock his aunt gave him the three pence, and to quote is own words some whittals in a handkerchief. His idear was to have a short holiday. Allowing for a day for the journey, he intended to stay in Eastbourne over Wednesday, and walk back to Crowborough on Thursday. The boy Moses Ripley was Eleven years old, the little fellow is attired in the usual paupers garb, and appears to be enjoying the best of health, is somewhat depressed and loafing to be free again. He has been in the workhouse for three weeks and as not been outside for a single hour. In the course of a conversation with our representative he said.  “ My father and mother are both alive but I don’t know where they are, my father ran away from us, I believe he goes round London with a coal cart, my mother is travelling around the country with her grandfather in a Gipsy caravan, I have been living with my aunt in Crowborough, I had the cat with me, I would rather drown myself than leave it, I did not make it walk I had a small wicker bath chair with me as well, so I put it in and gave it a ride, I was going to stay for one day and then walk back the next day, I did think to get some work, I have an aunt in Eastbourne somewhere but I don’t know where to find her, but I thought I could chance to meet her, the police man brought me to the police station and brought me here ”. 
Dick Whittington losses his cat.
Lady. Charlotte Graham Foley, wrote to the Master of the Workhouse, offering to provide a home for the animal until the boy left the Workhouse, but before this letter arrived the cat had disappeared, to the great sorrow of the owner.

to be continued....

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #30 on: Sunday 22 April 18 17:50 BST (UK) »
 Hi Shaun

  I am finding much information, we will all learn, not just me and you, but everyone.The South of England, holds much History of All the Gipsy People, we must take our time, if you were on a boat river journey, wouldn't it be a waste now to lay back and just read a book, we must take in all we see, i often have read of the thoughts of the old Gipsy Scholars, i often to thought of all the Fine People and truths that they missed.

 Kent and Sussex Courier
 Friday 8 October 1875
 Extract

Assault by Pickeys-Thomas Ball charged at Loose…. It appears that defendant who is one of a Party of Pickeys, or travelling Gipsies, was in the Chequers, Loose, prosecutor tried to induce them to leave the House, prosecutor was badly used. 

 South Eastern Gazette
 Tuesday 21 February 1854
 Extract

Two Pickeys named Alexandra Lee and Abraham Emmett charged with rescuing four Donkeys from the pound…also Abraham Emmett charged with assaulting the Rainham Watchman aided by several Women.

 Kentish Gazette
 Tuesday 8 March 1859
 Extract

Patience Lee-at Sandwich Kent. Charged with receiving stolen property, articles found in the pickey`s travelling wagon, the name of Patience Lee was engraved upon it.


 Saturday 30 March 1946
 Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser

 Local Notes and Queries Column

  The origin and meaning of words is the topic of the day, the derivation of the word Diddykie, meaning a Gipsy is in open discussion in the writings of this day. It is told to us that Gipsies are known as Pickey-Folk` in Kent and she supposed this is because they travel the Turnpike.

“ This may be so, but another derivation is from Pikie or Pyke. Meaning dishonest or pilfering.
F.F. DIDECOYS OR DIDIKAIS in last Tuesdays Daily Sketch Miss. A. M. MOYLON of East Lambrook. Asked if any reader could tell her wence comes the West Country word for a Gipsy which she spelt Diddykie. Up to the present. No reply has appeared in the Sketch. And evan any reader of that Paper should send to the Editor the information for which Miss. Moylon asks, I think it extremely unlikely that, with the present restrictions on the Newspapers on the use of paper they would not find it possible to spare sufficient space to deal with this interesting word as it deserves. The word in various forms was formerly in fairly general use in Somerset and Dorset, but it does not appear in most of the local glossaries of either County. I gave it as Didecoy in my glossary of the local dialect words which I contributed to the Castle Cary Visitor in 1912. As being commonly used in the Villagers in that part of Somerset.
 Major Garton gives Didikies as a local dialect word for Gipsies in his Glowing Embers from Somerset Hearth, in which he says: One day zum Diddikies. Th`as what you d`call Gipsies, come along an` unth`but bide thur a vew days. Mrs. Kettlewell gives Deddikie as a word used for Gipsy in the East Harptree district, and Mr. F. W. Mathews gives Diddykie as used in the neighbourhood of Wellington and the Black Down Hills. Mr. F.C. Taylor of  {Mendip Hills} used the word Diddycoys for Gipsies in a local directory which wrote for Word-Lore in January. 1926. And this led the Rev. A. H. Baverstock. Rector of Hinton Martel. Wimborne. To write and enquire as to the origin of the word, which he said was very familiar to him from local use in Dorset. In reply Mr. Taylor wrote: I have always understood the word to be used as a phrase of contempt. Applying to a Class that was not true Gipsies, i.e an half bred gipsy, low –class dealers, travellers but are not amendable to the unwritten laws of the king or queen of the gipsy tribe, and who are not recognised by members of a gipsy tribe, but always spoken scathingly of by them as a Diddycoy; I have frequently heard the local word used in the Midlands and the distict of Somerset, it is used daily when speaking of Gipsies, Horse Dealers, &c. An old Somerset Woman who was asked some years ago if she new the word, replied….you can`t call `em  Gipsies exactly; they be more what do call going-about bodies; Mr. R. A. Scott Macfie, former Editor of the Journal of the Gypsy Lore Society and Romani Scholor, said that Didakai was a name applied to half-bred by pure bred gipsies, it being an intimation of the way half-bred gipsies talk Romani ( did akia for dik akai. Meaning look here.] And this the derivation and meaning given by Smart and Croften in the Dialect of the English Gypsies. The late Mr. Willis Watson wrote in the Journal of the Gypsy Lore Society in 1933: …Perhaps the most attractive member of the Gypsy Family’s were little Didikais- a term constantly used in Somerset in my youth at least to indicate a Gypsy, but especially a boy Gypsy. The word Didikai and its variants are heard in other Counties, but nowhere more frequently than in the district around Crewkern Chard. Langport. And Castle Gary. In South East Somerset. A variant of the word, Didikites: has slipped over into Dorsetshire. Nothing pleased us more, when Children, than to see a little boy Didikia. The little Didikai accepted any gift-say. a slice of cake or something of the sort-only after much persuasion. He was decidedly coy or pretended to be so. Hence yeares ago, in Somersetshire Cottages, if a child were offered something and declined it, though it was well known the present would be acceptable, the remark was made { She-He} is a regular little Didikai`- meaning a Pretender".

to be continued....

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #31 on: Saturday 05 May 18 09:28 BST (UK) »
 Helo Shaun

  I will next start putting on all the information about the beeneys that I have been researching for you, i just want to first explain, and say for you, that how down through the years certain people have sort to separate the “Gipsy Family” for there own agenda, so if you again come across the word “Pikey”, just know this word for what it is, its just a meaning word. “Diddycoy” i am also doing research on, the origin of this word is not yet clear, but the strangest thing is how people again seem to loose all thoughts of reason, I was told when I was young that “Diddycoy” is just a Gipsy that comes from a relationship between a Gipsy and a person not from the Gipsy Family, Gipsies , Romanys, they are all the same People, the word Romany just represents the fact that you as a Gipsy have more old ways from the times of the Gipsies who first came to Britain, the Romany Gipsies kept it more strong, everyone tho are all Gipsies, the Romanys had more about them in the way that they had the “Old” in them, they were all mostley rip roaring, they all did much the same things, I just cannot understand  why people have listened to false things that as been wrote, a Gipsy is a Gipsy, you either know or you don’t know, the scholar stranger writers over history could never be friends with a Gipsy, so they created two.
 
Canterbury Journal, Kentish Times and Farmers Gazette
Saturday 10 July 1847 Extract

Mr. Smyth’s speech at Canterbury …..To the Oracles of the Party, he stated why its Founders took the name of Tory-which meant the lowest peasant, and the vileist Irish people. The word signified in Irish what Pickey did in Kentish

Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser 9 April 1938 Extract

  In this article a writer is talking about does the name diddykies-diddikies still persist, One thought is it could derive its origin from the words “Diddler” or “dicker” slang names for members of the underworld. another explanation is given as Crystal Gazing “Didecahedral” the other usual explanations are also given, it is then stated that Major Garton. In a glossary at the end of his book “ Glowing Embers from Somerset Hearth.” Gives the word Didikies meaning Gipsies, and of its origin he simple states “ Dydrerian ? ” – the query mark being Major Gartons. The Writer as been unable to discover (as as other writers in following years,) the origin of the word Dyderian.

 A.S. = Anglo Saxon.

GLEANINGS FROM A SCHOOL BOYS VOCABULARY
The Magazine of the Independent Colledge, Taunton.
School News
Number 25 July 1889. Extract

‘Dyderian’ (Latin decipere) is a very old English word. It has degenerated into the modern slang word to diddle, but still has the old meaning,- to trick, deceive with cunning and slyness. In many schools it is no longer used.

Poems of Rural Life, in the Dorset Dialect: 
 
William Barnes - 1847 
  A-S. [dyderian, dydrian, or be-dydrian.] To confound; to bewilder or entangle.     
“Methinks thou deceivest and bewilderest me”   

 An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary-Proto-Germanic & Indo-European Studies
 Linguistics, Culture, History, Mythology, Anthropology. Extract
 be-didrian;  To deceive; decipere :-- Wéndon ge, ðæt ge mihton bedidrian mínne gelícan
"think ye, that ye could deceive one like me?"  be-dyderian, dyderian.

 An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English by Ernest Weekley 1865-1954. Extract
  'diddle' to swindle.  from character Jeremy Diddler, the name of a swindling character a scrounger in the play, {farce} Raising the Wind (1803) by James Kenney:  A.S. dyderian, to trick to fool. 
 
 An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary:
Based on the Manuscript Collections of the Late Joseph Bosworth.     1789-1876; 1848. Page 221

Blackburn Standard Wednesday 21 July 1852
Narratives of Crime
(From the Twenty – Eight Report of the Rev. John Clay, Chaplain to the Preston House of Correction.)..very small extract

Criminals Among Travellers, Gipseys &.
It appears desirable that a class which fosters into action such lawless and desperate men as these, should have some attention paid to it;  ………I beg to offer what I have gathered from nine or ten independent statements relating to the same facts, and substantially agreeing with each other…. The Gipseyes, Romanyes, half-breeds, and travellers.... In all that he states he is confirmed by the separate testimony of his companions in crime...

….i would state, that although in the several accounts I have used,  "travellers"  may be.... (confounded).... with the half-breeds or pure Gipsey…. I finish, therefore, these reference’s and quotations by giving the chief passages of his memoir relating to GIPSEYS, &
by preserving his own words…."Gipseys, Romaneys, Didycoys, {Our People} as they call themselves, are certainly a distinct class both in manners and customs; and not withstanding the favourable light in which they have been presented by Bulwer, James, Ainsworth and others….If the Author had passed one night with me in one of those tents upon the Forest of Dean, at a (Didycoys Switching,) ( Gipsey Wedding) he would of seen anough to cure him of his Gipsey romance, and also to induce him to buy up all unsold copies of his song".
 
Confounded....
to throw into increased confusion or disorder.to treat or regard erroneously
as identical; mix or associate by mistake: 



 

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #32 on: Monday 21 May 18 20:48 BST (UK) »
Hi Shaun
If you have any information to add to this story would you please put it on, and also to all the other people who p.m me, well i will put more up of the  Beaney and related Family's that you request.

Sussex Advertiser Tuesday 25 January 1859

WADHURST

A curious wedding._On Saturday last, 22nd instant, a marriage of a very uncommon character in this neighbourhood was celebrated at the Baptist Chapel at Shovers' Green Wadhurst, which is duly registered as a building for the solemnisation of marriages. The wedding dresses were of such peculiar character, particularly the bridegroom`s, (whose rather aristocratical name, by the bye, is William Jenkins Stratton,) that all the matrimonial clothiers in the Kingdom may be challenged that they have never prepared and produced nuptial dresses of such texture and adornments. The bridegroom is by profession and practice, a sweep, and he was so busily engaged in his profession on the morning of his wedding that he had no time (and perhaps no inclination) to either wash his flesh, comb his locks, or change his business dress, so that he was as black as a sweep, and it is believed that he had left two chimneys undone at a gentleman’s house in order that he mignt not be behind the appointed time. The dress of the Bride (Philadelphia Beany, widow) was also very appropriate for the occasion, and resembled in colour and tint very much that of the bridegroom, particularly her raven hair, which evidently identified her of Gipsy extraction.
 
Hastings and st Leonards Observer
Saturday 10 May 1873
Extract
Ticehurst. Inquest._On the afternoon of Tuesday week an inquest was held at the Cherry Tree Inn, On the body of an old Woman Philadelphia Stratton, the wife of a chimney sweep, whose death in April resulted from injuries received in a fall when quarreling with a man named John Colvin.
 
Wm Stratton, Chimney Sweep deposed: “The deceased was my wife. On the afternoon of the 21st ult. She came to me at the Royal oak Inn, Flimwell, and stayed with me about two hours. I sent her home to prepare the supper; I had to stop to pay a wheelwright. I went to bed about eleven o`clock, and about one o`clock I heard her coming upstairs. She complained of having been kicked about. She was in great pain, She told me she had been in the Welcome Stranger Beer Shop. She said she was there and asked a man named Colvin for 10d; which he owed her. He refused to pay and then ill used her. She was quite sober when she came home. She died at twelve o`clock on Saturday last. She told me several times that she asked Colvin for the money, he pushed her away from him, and she fell against the side of a seat. Then he picked her up and dashed her down the steps, and then kicked her”. –  Richard Harvey deposed:   “ She asked  Colvin to lend her sixpence. He said he hadn’t one. She then said, will you pay me the 10d. You owe me, for the stockings. She immediately got in an exited state, she went towards him and threw up her hands, and said, now, Jack; you pay me the 10d you owe me. I don’t think she struck him, as she was not close anough. He pushed her backwards towards the door, and she fell against a fixed stool. I went and had my tea, and after that I saw her laying on the floor close to the spot where she first fell, I should think it was about seven o`clock ”. - James Farley deposed: “I went to the Beer Shop on the 21st ult about four o`clock. Colvin was there, and the deceased came in about a quarter of an hour afterwards. He pushed her with both hands across the room, and she came across pretty hard, he appeared to be angry, she layed on the floor for some time, and still going on about the stockings, about ten minutes afterwards Colvin took hold of her and put her out of the doors, she had kept on at him about the ten pence. Colvin appeared to have had a little beer. He carried her and sat her just outside the door; he appeared to do it gently”. – Joseph Pankhurst Landlord, deposed: “About seven o`clock I found deceased lying just outside my taproom door. She told me she had been hurt by Colvin. I lifted her up and put her on a seat, but she fell down again. She appeared to be quite sober. She layed in one corner of the room all evening, and at about 11o`clock I took her handcart to her gate, she walked from my house to the gate". -John Taylor, Surgeon, practicing at Ticehurst, deposed: “I was sent to see deceased on Tuesday morning last, she was suffering from broken ribs. I have since made my last examination. The immediate course of death was pleurisy and inflammation of the right lung coursed by the fracture. One rib punctured the lung. The fall I have heard described would course the fracture”. The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of Accidental death.- The Coroner, addressing the prisoner Colvin, told him he had had a very narrow escape of a verdict of manslaughter being found against him, and he must consider himself very fortunate that such was not the case, and take this as a caution.

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read through this informative web site
http://theromany.weebly.com/beaney.html

scroll down to post 16 on this interesting link 
https://genealogy-specialists.com/threads/mears-deacon.5577/

Offline achooo

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #33 on: Wednesday 30 May 18 20:36 BST (UK) »
its getting all mixed up on here bit confusing  ball family showman now its beany family

Offline panished

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #34 on: Saturday 02 June 18 08:16 BST (UK) »
Hello Shaun

I hope you do not mind and i am sure you will carry on with your researchers into all your family's, good luck with all your endeavors, so this will be the last connecting story i write for you, i have tried to bring some of the many names into this story, i have collected hundreds of records it as taken quite some time, i like to read through them and bring the story out to show the real lives of the Peoples, through this way of writing many doors open, when i find a story i take interest in say just a road name, or evan a name of a Public House, then i go all out researching just that said name, you can then find a record with another related name connected to the Road Name or the Pub Name, it may take days but it works, plus you get to learn all about related histories of the past, i know i may gets things wrong at times but the people who will use my research will have a better understanding  than me of their relations so they can use my research to form a more correct picture of the past, i also know some people just like to collect names and true that is their prerogative, myself well i am so bewildered how people of the past and present present the Peoples of all the Communities that i speak of in a way that to me they are speaking of in their writings of aliens to the truth, I try to see the bigger picture, through this People like yourself may refine and correct on my writings, so i will write down in my final posts to you many such plain facts such as a date and a name and where you yourself or all the other fine people who research on Roots Chat may if they wish look up, if anyone takes offence to this of course i will not write them here and so this then will be my final post to you. Just a note of caution.. in many records that people of the past have transcribed they may use words like Gipsy, Hawker, Romany, Tramp, Showman, Tinker, Pedlar, Diddycoy, Journeyman, Pikey and more, just beware not to fall into the trap that most people fall for, remember the Peoples i write about are diverse and the web of life takes manys the turning on the travels on the journey of truth.. never stand still in one place...the People i write about never did....there truthfully are no labels.....its strangers who have written who stamp and brand that which they wish to enslave in their own name for they are truly writing of themselves and their ways.

Friday 27 April 1923
Kent & Sussex Courier
Extract.

Death of Mrs. Rowland. A familiar and much respected figure of High Brooms passed away Friday. Mary Ann Rowland, who would have attained her 66 birthday on May 3. She came from a well known Welsh travelling family, and her maiden name was Mary Ann Beaney. Her parents were Mr. Absalom and Mrs. Priscilla Beaney. The family traveled the country as Showmen, Horse and Furniture Dealers, and 46 years ago settled down in caravans at 74 Nursery Road. At the time the Brooms District was largely forests and woodlands. For years the occupants of the caravans pursued their peculiar calling, maintaining the happiest relations with all in High Brooms, and Mrs. Rowland earned esteem and respect by her friendly dispositions, unfailing kindness and habitual generosity. Forty three years ago she married Joseph Rowland, Furniture Dealer, at Eastbourne Old Church, and there were six Sons and one Daughter of the marriage. All the Sons predeceased their Mother, and the Daughter is Mrs, Frances Brazil, wife of Mr, Christopher Brazil, Greengrocer, Silverdale Road. Mrs. Rowlands had three brothers. Coper, Samuel and Robert, and two sisters. Ruth and Celia. The deceased had toured all parts of England, and had visited Wales, the Isle of Wight and Ireland. She is said to have had many adventurous experiences, was twise run over by a caravan, once by a motor lorry, and once by a motor car, she was a distant relative of Joseph Beckett, the boxer, and looked after him when he was a lad. In a Kentish hop garden she once found a little girl, Matilda Carter, who was born in India, and whom she brought up as one of her own family. Today she is the wife of Joseph Beaney. Deceased had been in failing health for some time past, and underwent radium treatment at the General Hospital. The funeral took place at Southborough Cemetery on Wednesday, the service being conducted by the Rev. P. Orme. Vicar of High Brooms. The Relations and mourners present included:- Mr. Rowland, Husband; Mr. and Mrs. M. Brazil. daughter and son-in-law; Mr Samuel Beaney. Mr. William Beaney and Mr. Robert Beaney, brothers; Mrs. Ruth Ball, sister; Maria Ann Brazill. Mona Brazill. Absalom Brazill. Joseph Brazill and Priscilla Rowland, grandchildren; Matilda Beaney, Esther Beaney and Mrs. Pannell. Sister-in-laws; William Ball, John Johnson and Edward Rowland. brother-in-laws; Joe Beaney nephew; Priscilla Beaney and Sarah Ann Beaney. Nieces; Mr. and Mrs. B. Bacon, aunt and uncle; Mr. and Mrs. M. Carter. Priscilla and Henry Ripley. Mr. F.G. Shelly, Mr, Draper, Mrs. Brooker. Mrs Gillam. Mrs. Fuller.Miss R. Brazill, Mrs. N. Brazill   
Mr. J. Brazill. Mrs. Maria Carter. Mrs. J Ripley. Mrs .W. Bacon. Mr. and Mrs. J. Beaney. Mrs. P. Beaney. Mrs. C. Beaney. Mrs. L. and Mr. Alfred Bond.jun.................Mr. Rowland and Family thank all kind Friends for letters of sympathy and floral tributes in their sad bereavement  and the Nurses of the General Hospital .

Offline achooo

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #35 on: Tuesday 05 June 18 17:59 BST (UK) »
thank you panished thats family i was trying to find.