Author Topic: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN  (Read 8121 times)

Offline panished

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #27 on: Tuesday 10 April 18 20:40 BST (UK) »
 Hi  Shaun

 The word "Pikey"  i think its a much misused word that came to signify several ways of thinking, which one is right and where did it truly derive its origin, well from my research i will show you that so far i think it comes from the  County of Kent, the Garden of England, this as everything todo with the Gipsy People, like the word Pickey, Gipsy People have been labeled in several ways meaning several different kinds of people and meanings,  after a certain timescale meanings change as do people, in life everything evolves, maybe nothing at all stands still, these below are a few clues that i have been looking at regarding relating matters to the history of the Beeney Family, later in another post i will show you many examples of the People stated.

Kentish Gazette Tuesday 26 January 1869
EXTRACT
Kentish Words_ The word pikey is used exclusively in Kent. I never heard it elsewhere, it is commonly used there instead of the word Gipsy. During residence of a few months in west Kent, i became acquainted with some words that are new to me. For example, i was much puzzled when i seen a woman cry out in her garden. The skaydles got a bit o flick in her mouth ans arum under the slats. On inquiry was told that a skaydle is a thievish cat, flick is the hair of a rabbit or hare; and slats are thin, flat, untitled pea pods.

Cardiff Times Saturday 25 June 1898
Extract
Perhaps you are called a Romany Chal; whats that? he cried gazing at me from his staring eyes. A Gipsy isn't it? He grinned, well i believe iv some pikey blood in me. What do you meen by pikey Gipsy, said he. That must be a local term, said i, proberbly derived from the word turnpike, as connecting the Gipsies to the road.

Kentish Gazette 31 August 1847
Extract
Canterbury Races. These once great County meetings and annual holidays of four and five days duration, were feebly imitated and wretchedly burlesqued on Thursday and Friday last.....How unlike the Steward of olden times! when that all-essential functionary, booted and be-spurred, was keenly scrutinized from the observatory to the weighing room in admiring and breathless silence; and who, his duties completed, was greeted with smiling eyes, and radiant and blooming faces from the most exclusive coterie of the dazzling galaxy in the stands. These attractions, were in every respect wanting last week; and the steward and his friends, for lack of mere refitted occupation, repaired to the dark_eyed daughters of Egypt, the Pikeys of his classic orations, for consolations and amusement.

I have found several records where they state Gipsy and Pikey, as well as just saying Pikey instead of saying Gipsy, as in saying they are the same meanings, i have also read which i will show you where records say Gipsy or Pikey, then i found what i think is maybe a truer meaning from the 1400s, if true this will prove the word Pikey comes from a different time and meaning yet the origin of the word itself suited the peoples the word was first set out to describe, so as different people merged the word itself then came to be known as a word for all. To some degree i think every person today in Britain with Gipsy ancestry are descended from the Gipsies that came over from mainline Europe and the new invigorated local populations that survived the plague years, so words once used in certain ways to describe certain ways of people evolved also in the same was as people assimulated. I will show you next the record from the 1400s, i do not know the truth i am just trying to find the truth, then i will show you lots of records of your Relatives

to be continued....

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Offline panished

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #28 on: Wednesday 11 April 18 21:03 BST (UK) »
Hi Shaun

  The next article is wrote in the newspaper below, it is about the accounts of the findings of Mr.C.G.Harper, 1863-1943, in his book "The Kentish Coast" 1914. I will at the end put on a link to the book itself, i will then tell you what page to read, Mr. Harper wrote some good informative books, i will put a list on at the end for further information about them.

Folkstone, Hythe, Sandgate & Chilton Herald
Saturday 12 March 1927

BY  ("Felix") "The Kentish Coast". This is the title of a volume written by Mr.C.G Harper and most interesting are its pleasant, and often amusing pages. We have often heard of the play of a single word. Take, for instance, Wye. Perhaps it may be traditions, but i have heard an irate railway passenger from Yorkshire, not acquainted with this part of the Country, how he enquired of a railway Porter, on the trains stopping at Wye, the name of the station. The courteous official replied "Wye Sir". Further said the Man from the North;
"Why becourse i want to know". The Porter is said to have replied again; " Wye Sir". There then followed quite a rangle and the Yorkshire man threatened to report the impudent Porter (as he thought) to the Station Master. However everything came right when it was explained to the stranger that Wye was the Place Name.
A Glimpse of Lydd in the Good Old Days. The way of transgressors is invariably hard, but appears it was very hard in Lydd in the distant past, as the following will prove.
 " That Ancient Chamberlains accounts of about 1475 show ", says the Author, misdemeanants had the very worst of times at Lydd. First we find it ordered that anyone found Cutting or Pikeying (Stealing) Purses or other goods of lytille value, be brought to the high strete and have their ere nayed to a post or cart whele; Then follows; " Paid for nayling of Thomas Norris ere 12d." There was a grim quality about the justice of those times. A knife was handed to the offender so that he might release himself by cutting of his ear whenever he chose. The term imprisonment therefore depended upon himself. Whether Thomas Norris was a " regular hand " or a first offender is not mentioned by the Author, but at any rate they had rough justice at Lydd in 1475. " The Kentish Coast" is Published by Messrs. Chapman and Hall.

So if i am reading the above article right in the Ancient Chamberlains Accounts of 1475 there is mention of the word Pickey as in steal as in pickeying as in stealing. Maybe this is how the word was first used, i do not know if this is how in Kent the word Pickey first came about, its a good bit of local history tho, in the book when quoting the old way of spelling it says " Cutting " is spelt " Cuttyng ". "Pickeying " is spelt " Pickeyng ". This is the Link to the Book below, turn to page 360. I think the whole book is very good.

 https://archive.org/details/kentishcoast00harprich

 I will put several records on the next page regarding this word Pikey plus the Peoples it mentions, then i will finish of this research with just records of your Relatives, i hope at the end of these writing i may have been of help to you in your research. Remember in that record i wrote about Henry Beney two pages back

South Eastern Gazette
12 July 1859
Kent

OBSTRUCTING THE ROAD _ Henry Beney, travelling horse dealer, vulgary termed " pickey", was charged with obstructing the roads in the town of Tunbridge.

well in 1859 they said then they thought the word as a vulgar one, this is evidence.
Below is the link to the Online Books by

Charles G. Harper
(Harper, Charles G. (Charles George), 1863-1943) 
some very interesting reading. 
http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Harper%2C%20Charles%20G%2E%20%28Charles%20George%29%2C%201863%2D1943


Shaun look on the two links below, you can check through the timelines, one is about the Black Death, the Plague that decimated the population of the country's of Europe and the other is a timeline of the stated movements of the Romany Gipsies, by 1407 it is wrote that the Gipsies are now in Germany, the plague was stated as fading out around 1353, it is evan wrote that in the years 1350/1400 the Gipsies were being welcomed, this was be course millions of workers were dead, the plague itself could also of been a factor by driving the Gipsies Westward out of Greece and Turkey, this all as to do with who the Gipsies of Britain are, that includes Familys like the Beeneys,

http://www.totallytimelines.com/the-black-death-1346-1353/

https://gypsiesroma.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/timeline-of-violence-against-of-gypsies.html

to be continued....

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Offline panished

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Re: Ball family (a branch married into Penfolds) SHOWMEN
« Reply #29 on: Sunday 15 April 18 12:36 BST (UK) »
Hi Shaun
 
I see through your writings that your relatives are also related to the Ripley's, when you do your research in the way i do, you will find so much more information, i will put up records for you, i have found a lot, with many names, Good Luck to you...there is no need for you to keep writing back just use the information i find to create a bigger picture, names trades locations, search through all the records and a thread will appear, this will guide you.This will be the last time i do a direct research for anybody, i have to finish my other researchers, or at least leave them for the next person in a right state. These records below are of great Historical Value also. Do you see how the two Absalom's alter the Beeney name, then the contradictions in the final two records are of great importance, there is several story's within each story, its knowing how to read them, that is the secret to all knowledge of the peoples i write about. I remember my Mother telling me all about the the Old Gipsies, do you know everything in every-way as turned out to be true, right from the Oldest of the Romany Gipsies who stayed more within themselves to Romany Gipsies who assimilated and created a bigger Family, you see the truth that binds them is in the records.
strangers have often wrote..." This type does that or that type goes on like this ". yet i have read records of all the Gipsy Family's of Britain. I will leave that with you.


 Hastings and St Leonard's Observer
Saturday 8 May 1875

Horses Straying. Absalom Beney, Mark Ripley, and Absalom Beany, three travelers with vans, pleaded guilty to having allowed their horse to stray in Pennell Road on Sunday. Superintendent Jeffery said it was a common offence with people of defendant’s class, all over the country. Defendant - “ We offered to pay anything as we came along to put our horses up, but nobody would take it ” Another defendant - “ Why don’t they refuse to give licenses ? When drove to it we could do something else ”. Defendants were fined Half-a- Crown each and licenses were made out.

Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser
Wednesday 6 November 1867

 A few days ago a man named Ripley, well known here as a hawker of Brushers, Chairs; to show that he had the most money of the company present, produced from his caravan a sack containing nine thousand Sovereigns! And also showed a bag full of Guineas, and another containing Crown Pieces; and his wife turned out £100 in loose Cash from her pocket. This wealthy couple are extremely ignorant, can neither read nor write, and have not the slightest faith in banks or any other investments.


In the Year 1900 Moses Ripley Strode like Goliath, this is his story...... so far.
Eastbourne Gazette
15 August
5/12 September
Dundee Evening Telegraph 4 September

The familiar story of Dick Whittington’s journey to London is called to mind by the experience of a North Sussex Lad named Moses Ripley, whilst patrolling his beat in Orchard Road in the early hours of Wednesday morning an Eastbourne Police Constable observed the Boy sleeping in one of the new hollows in the course of erection here, and like the original hero his only companion was a cat which he was nursing. Upon being awakened he was taken straight away to the Police Station at the Town Hall where he and his cat were secured, the boy said he had walked into Eastbourne from Crowborough, he had accomplished a distance of thirty miles in thirteen hours, the cat is a splendid specimen of the silver grey type, he had eaten all his food before he reached Eastbourne but is still possessed of his three pence a thought that seemed to give him pleasure. The little fellow left Crowborough for Eastbourne at Eight o’clock his aunt gave him the three pence, and to quote is own words some whittals in a handkerchief. His idear was to have a short holiday. Allowing for a day for the journey, he intended to stay in Eastbourne over Wednesday, and walk back to Crowborough on Thursday. The boy Moses Ripley was Eleven years old, the little fellow is attired in the usual paupers garb, and appears to be enjoying the best of health, is somewhat depressed and loafing to be free again. He has been in the workhouse for three weeks and as not been outside for a single hour. In the course of a conversation with our representative he said.  “ My father and mother are both alive but I don’t know where they are, my father ran away from us, I believe he goes round London with a coal cart, my mother is travelling around the country with her grandfather in a Gipsy caravan, I have been living with my aunt in Crowborough, I had the cat with me, I would rather drown myself than leave it, I did not make it walk I had a small wicker bath chair with me as well, so I put it in and gave it a ride, I was going to stay for one day and then walk back the next day, I did think to get some work, I have an aunt in Eastbourne somewhere but I don’t know where to find her, but I thought I could chance to meet her, the police man brought me to the police station and brought me here ”. 
Dick Whittington losses his cat.
Lady. Charlotte Graham Foley, wrote to the Master of the Workhouse, offering to provide a home for the animal until the boy left the Workhouse, but before this letter arrived the cat had disappeared, to the great sorrow of the owner.

to be continued....