Author Topic: p.o.w in BAB 21  (Read 4774 times)

Offline mrs bongo

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Re: p.o.w in BAB 21
« Reply #9 on: Friday 10 June 16 23:37 BST (UK) »
hi  all
 im looking for any info regarding William j heckford  who was in the navy he was a pow ww2 in bab21  im not to sure where to start looking
kind regards
 

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Offline ScouseBoy

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Re: p.o.w in BAB 21
« Reply #10 on: Friday 10 June 16 23:39 BST (UK) »
What was his rank in the Navy?    Was he Merchant Navy or Royal Navy?
Nursall   ~    Buckinghamshire
Avies ~   Norwich

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Offline mrs bongo

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Re: p.o.w in BAB 21
« Reply #11 on: Friday 10 June 16 23:56 BST (UK) »
hi 
all I know he was ab    p/ssx28765 royal navy
 kind regards

Offline cardboard

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Re: p.o.w in BAB 21
« Reply #12 on: Wednesday 12 September 18 23:20 BST (UK) »
have been told it was a forced labour camp.

Just wanted to say that Bau und Arbeits Battalions were not forced labour, even though the work wasn't pleasent.


Prisoner of War working parties WERE forced labour at the point of a gun.  They could be working anything from 8 to 18 hours a day on as little as 250 grams of bread - usually erstatz bread made from potato starch and extended with sawdust - and a litre of soup a day.   Most of these pow would rather have had nothing to do than have been forced to work for the enemy as unpaid labour slaving for the Nazi regime. Many were forced to continue working even though they were sick or injured. At the end of the war many of these POW's returned home having lost half of their pre war body weight.

BAB 20 at Reigersfeld was one of several labour camps in the area of Blechhammer in Ober Silesia.  The POW's in BAB 20 were worked in the area of Heydebreck, also known as Blechhammer South, where they were used as forced labour to build factories that were to produce the fuel of benzene.  A POW at BAB 20 named Joseph Gribben was shot by a German guard, Gerfreiter Sontag, on 27th March 1942 for refusing to work as he was unable to lift and move a heavily laden wheelbarrow - National Archives WO30912240 (598478 )

The German government known as the Weimar Republic 1919 - 1933 was a signatory to the 1929 Geneva Convention.  However the Nazi regime did not recognise the obligations of the Weimar Republic.  Following the war SHAEFE - Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force in Europe and the International Red Cross found little evidence of adherence to the convention by the Nazi regime towards POW's.