Author Topic: Suicide burial  (Read 8638 times)

Online BushInn1746

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,133
  • Selby 1815. Have You Seen Signature Anywhere Else?
    • View Profile
Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #9 on: Wednesday 11 April 18 12:22 BST (UK) »
Hello

Regarding suicide and services for them, see historic attachments here ...

http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=769779.0

If someone lay violent hands upon themselves the Order for the Burial of the Dead in the C of E would not be used. Their Book (extracts in the link) did indicate that Unbaptised and Suicide were to be treated differently.


These are not my views, as the Bible speaks of a resurrection and we should show compassion to those affected by bereavement, including the dreadful loss of a child or those left behind affected by the suicide of a loved one.

 -----------

My 4 X Great Grandfather George HOOD died of heart disease in September 1845 certified 18 months, but was buried in the Quaker Burial Ground at Selby, as "Not in Membership". A little more information attached to the post below. His origin is unconfirmed.

 -----------

I have read in a later 19th Century newspaper about the burial of an unbaptised child was not permitted in the local Parish, forcing the parents to seek a more distant Parish who did accept two men to lower the Child into a grave, with the following terms.

The child's grave would be against the boundary wall of the churchyard
Two men would lower the child's coffin into the grave.
The parents would have to stand outside the boundary wall whilst their child's coffin was lowered into the grave.

The child's burial caused public outrage and the article indicates campaigners were insisting on a change in Statute Law regarding unbaptised children.

 ----------

I see some Nonconformists have Churchyard burials and some NC are buried in private cemeteries run by General Cemetery Companies which sprang up around 1820 - 1830 (in Yorkshire) and those like Bunhill Fields, used by non-denominational, nonconformists / dissenters.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunhill_Fields

A really old Dissenters Burial Ground is Ballast Hills Burial Ground (goes back circa 300 years) at Newcastle upon Tyne. Although the Registers only survive back to circa 1792. However, the M.I. records taken early 1800s show it was an older cemetery where Dissenters and Nonconformists were also buried.

Westgate Hill Cemetery Company established another private Cemetery Company in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Mark
"George HOOD of Selby" Before 1812?

Born about 1785 (Yorkshire per 1841 Census)

Married Sarah RUSSELL at Selby 1815 newspaper - "both of that place".

Buried in the Quaker Burial Ground at Selby as "Not in Membership" in 1845, aged 60 years.

George HOOD of Selby was refused Membership of the Quakers in 1836.

Elected Overseer of the Poor of Selby in 1838.

Had both known (Selby) and unknown (some not stated 1846) property interests.

Possible (but unknown) links to COOK and/or PEARSON names.

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline stanmapstone

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 23,553
    • View Profile
Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #10 on: Wednesday 11 April 18 13:41 BST (UK) »
All municipal cemeteries have a section of unconsecrated ground. Consecrated ground is consecrated  according to the rites of the Church of England.
Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline stanmapstone

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 23,553
    • View Profile
Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #11 on: Wednesday 11 April 18 13:51 BST (UK) »
Consecration is the formal dedication and setting apart, by a Bishop, of a church, churchyard, or burial-ground.  There are legal consequences attaching to consecration, for instance a body cannot be removed from consecrated ground for burial elsewhere without a faculty.
For disused burial grounds where the site is or contains consecrated ground, management of the site must be authorised by licence or faculty of the Bishop.
Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk