Author Topic: Blyth History.  (Read 83141 times)

Offline peteloud

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Chippies
« Reply #369 on: Monday 08 January 18 11:28 GMT (UK) »
Pityaka,
I am surprised that you do not instantly remember Morgan's chippie in Newsham. It had the most prominent site in Newsham. It was directly in front of the railway crossing when looking towards Blyth. Now there is a roundabout where it stood.

I think that there might have been another chippie in Newsham in my very early days. I only have one very early, vague memory of it. Do you remember the wooden hut where Jimmy White had his barber's shop, before he moved on to Plessey Road? It was next to the railway line between the crossing and The Black Diamond. Well, I think there was a chippie, a black hut,  there, next to Jimmy White's.  It must have closed around 1950, or soon after.

I was reminded by a friend, that there was another chippie down Blyth near Ridley park, perhaps on Briarwood Road. I have a very vague memory of going there once, probably around 1960, but it's all very vague.

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Offline peeem

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Re: Blyth History.
« Reply #370 on: Friday 12 January 18 18:04 GMT (UK) »
Re the chippy on Briarwood Road. The building still stands but I think it is not used now (not sure). It changed hands many times in the last few years but it seems it never made it.
It stands next to the back entrance of Bader Court.

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Offline blythian

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Re: Blyth History.
« Reply #371 on: Saturday 13 January 18 20:42 GMT (UK) »
I can remember going to that chippy as a kid in the 90's after waiting an hour for dinner to arrive at the Ridley lol.

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Scotland: Dempster, Henderson, Jackson, M(a)cMillan, M(a)cLanders
Ireland (Co.Mayo): Monaghan, Costello

+ all variations of above names.

Offline Cowpen Quay Exile

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Re: Blyth History.
« Reply #372 on: Monday 15 January 18 19:50 GMT (UK) »
Harry Cosimini had a Fish and Chip Shop next to Newsham level crossing .Shop still in business but no longer operated by the family . When Harry left his son Peter took on the business and ran it until he retired .Peter had a Fish and Chip Shop in Bowes Street before going to the Newsham premises .  Cecil Thompson took over " Morgan's " shop having given up his former shop at the bottom of Gladstone Street , Cowpen Quay .There is now a Fish and Chip Shop in the small shopping precinct at was once the middle block of Elliott Street .

Offline pityackafromblyth

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Re: Blyth History.
« Reply #373 on: Thursday 18 January 18 17:25 GMT (UK) »
Is it still used by youngsters in Blyth, nowadays, or has it vanished from our dialect/vocabulary/local sayings ??  And guess what it is ............... ?

Aa've got yiz aall skinchies.
 Used many a time whilst playing games  at the end of each row of houses.

Offline TriciaK

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Re: Blyth History.
« Reply #374 on: Thursday 18 January 18 19:21 GMT (UK) »
As I remember "skinch" you said it when you wanted to be temporarily out of a game. You crossed you fingers, said "skinch" and you were exempt.
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Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Blyth History.
« Reply #375 on: Thursday 18 January 18 21:24 GMT (UK) »
From the OED
Skinch: In children's games: a term used to call for a truce or claim temporary immunity from capture.
F. M. T. Palsgrave List Words & Phrases Hetton-le-Hole 42   Skinch, ‘Let be! I am not playing.’ When a boy wishes to stop playing at any running game, he shouts ‘Skinch’ meaning he is not liable to be caught and made prisoner.


Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
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Offline peteloud

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Skinch
« Reply #376 on: Friday 19 January 18 19:55 GMT (UK) »
Aye TriciaK,
That is exactly how I remember it.

stanmapstone
It is interesting to see that it is recorded in F. M. T. Palsgrave List Words & Phrases Hetton-le-Hole 42.  It would be sad to see these old ways of life disappear without a record.

I tell my grand-daughters about life being much more fun when I was a kid, (born 1946), and how there would always be lots of kids running around and playing together in the back lane.  When we weren't in the back lane were were building forts in the timber yard, playing on the pit heaps or exploring the Red Rocks.  Ahhh! that reminds me, there was Gamblers' Den at the Red Rocks.  Do any Newsham lads remember that?  We climbed trees, collected birds eggs, caught sticklebacks, frogs, newts anything.  We knew the names of all the birds and a million other things.

Do kids still play, in groups, in back lanes, or is it all TV, videos and computer tablets.  Now I am far to posh to even see a back lane  :(

Ironically, it seems that those with most to contribute are those of us who have been exiled from God's own country.

Offline pityackafromblyth

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Re: Blyth History.
« Reply #377 on: Sunday 11 February 18 15:39 GMT (UK) »
Many of you will not recall this habit - working man getting home from work, especially in the afternoon or evening, and then before, or after the tin bath, lying in front of the roaring coal fire in the living room to get heat and warmth into his body.  I can recall my Dad doing this, certainly in the early-mid 50s.  And when I was in digs in Yorkshire in the early 60s, I would do the same.  One afternoon, after finishing at 2pm, landlady gone out, could not be bothered to eat; lie down in front of the coal fire and get warmed up. [January time]  4 P.M. knock on the door, work colleague calling me back to work.  He disturbed my warmful slumber. :) :'(