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Author Topic: Workhouse or asylum?  (Read 2867 times)

Offline daffodil 7

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Workhouse or asylum?
« on: Monday 29 November 10 10:59 GMT (UK) »
I have an ancestor, Robert Marshall. He was in St. Annes Streatham Wandsworth from approx.1887 till his death in 1907. If it was a workhouse, why wasn't his wife and children there too? That's a long time to be there, 20 years. Only males appear to be there, mostly 50 year old and over. I have searched the internet and can't find records to show why he was there. Is there a quick way via the internet to find out?



Offline Mort29

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Re: Workhouse or asylum?
« Reply #1 on: Monday 29 November 10 11:09 GMT (UK) »
In both the 1891 & 1901 Census, 'St Annes Home' is described by the Enumerator as 'Workhouse - auxiliary of St Pancras', Streatham Hill.

St Annes Home is actually a unique Enumeration District in the census.

Have you googled around - there is a site specialising in Workhouses.

http://www.workhouses.org.uk/

St Anne's Home, Streatham Hill

From around 1890 to 1915, St Pancras accommodated aged and infirm males a branch workhouse at Streatham Hill known as the St Anne's Home. St Anne's had previously been the Royal Asylum of St Anne's Society, erected in 1829 to provide care and education for poor children. The building was a handsome edifice of three stories, surmounted by a cornice and parapet, and fronted centrally by an Ionic portico and pediment, ornamented with the royal arms.

The 1901 census records 496 inmates in residence at St Anne's. The establishment was taken over by the Bermondsey Union in around 1915. 


Records

London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, London EC1R OHB. Holdings include: Guardians' minutes (1867-1930); Letter books (1867-1930); etc.

    * St Pancras Workhouse: Admissions/discharges (1868-72, 1916-30); Births (1871-1923); Baptisms (1874-82, 1898-1904); Deaths (1871-1909); Creed registers (1869-1929)
    * South Infirmary: Admission and discharges (1920-36); Creed registers (1902-24); Deaths (1915-22).
    * Highgate Infirmary Admissions and discharges (1889-1911); Deaths (1870).
    * St Anne's Home: Admissions and discharges (1892-1914).
    * Leavesden School: Admissions and discharges (1870-1932); Creed registers (1870-1931); Lists of pauper children (1870-1931).



PS. Robert was shown as a 66 year old Widower in 1901 - a (Ret) Shoeing Smith


Offline daffodil 7

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Re: Workhouse or asylum?
« Reply #2 on: Monday 29 November 10 12:28 GMT (UK) »
Thank you Aristocrat.
From what you saw, do you think he had had a breakdown or was it usual for a family to be broken up ? I know that when he was first admitted his children were very young and his wife very much alive.

Offline jorose

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Re: Workhouse or asylum?
« Reply #3 on: Monday 29 November 10 18:09 GMT (UK) »
Where are his wife and children living in 1891 and with who?

Admission registers might show the circumstances. If he was unwell and unable to work, and his family couldn't take care of him or couldn't afford his care (perhaps his wife could work and bring in enough money to take care of the kids, but not do that while nursing her husband), it wouldn't be that unusual a situation for him to go in to the workhouse (infirmary) alone.

Or just the death certificate, depending on how much detail was given as to the cause of his death, could give you some good information.
Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline daffodil 7

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Re: Workhouse or asylum?
« Reply #4 on: Monday 29 November 10 22:49 GMT (UK) »
Thank you for your quick response.
In the 1891 census his wife Catherine (Kate) was shown living with a George Marshall, same surname perhaps related? George was also on 1901 census with her. George was also written as father for his daughters when they were married.

My very elderly father says there were a number of Marshalls in the area of London he lived in near his Grandmother, so no guarantee they were related.Robert was born in Amberley, Surrey and George in Soho, London.

The last child, and they were all close in age,born to Robert and Catherine was born in 1886. There were no children born to George and Catherine.Catherine I believe was born in 1843, Robert 1837 and George 1850. So I think that Robert went into an institution around 1887/1888. There is, as far as I can see no marriage between George and Catherine.

Offline daffodil 7

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Re: Workhouse or asylum?
« Reply #5 on: Monday 29 November 10 22:50 GMT (UK) »
Robert died of Senile Dementia in 1907.