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Offline Valda

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE
« on: Saturday 15 January 11 16:30 GMT (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE



Click on any of the blue underlined hyperlinks in the guide to view the information you are interested in.



There is a parish map for all the ecclesiastical parishes in the historic county of Buckinghamshire (Anglican Church parishes) on the BUCKINGHAMSHIRE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY website. GENUKI gives further information on each parish
 


ENGLAND JURISDICTIONS FOR 1851 is a map of the counties of England produced by Family Search. The map shows various levels of county division including parish and civil registration districts.
Civil registration commenced on 1st July 1837. Over the years with the growth and movement of the population the civil registration districts have altered.
REGISTRATION DISTRICTS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE on the Genuki website tracks the changes made up to 31st March 1974 and also has a downloadable place name index which includes the registration district each was registered in.   



The county record office the CENTRE FOR BUCKINGHAMSHIRE STUDIES has online lists of the ANGLICAN and NON-CONFORMIST burial registers that have been deposited with them.
Buckingham, Chesham and High Wycombe LIBRARIES also hold microfilm copies of parish registers for their areas.

 

The Church of Latter Day Saints (LDS), also known as Mormons, has many family history centres around the world. You can order and use their microfilms for a small charge. A list of their CENTRES     
It is worth checking their catalogue to see which parish and cemetery registers they hold on microfilm in their FILM CATALOGUE



The National Burial Index 3 (NBI) CD was released March 2010 and covers 176 parishes in Buckinghamshire. See the FEDERATION OF FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETIES website for coverage.   
Some of the indexes from the NBI are also on FINDMY PAST though not all Family History Societies have allowed their indexes from the NBI to be transferred to this website.



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY has published transcripts of church burial registers and offer searches in their indexes.
BURIAL INDEX (to 1901)
MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS
PARISH REGISTER PUBLICATIONS
 




Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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Offline Valda

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 15 January 11 16:58 GMT (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE



At the start of civil registration the government reached an agreement with most non-conformist churches. If the churches deposited their registers, in return they would be recognised as legal documents. Most churches except the Catholics deposited their records, with the Quakers (the Society of Friends) first making copies. The deposited non-conformist records are held in series RG4 (Registrar General) at The National Archives. A second smaller deposit of records was made in 1855. These records are held in series RG8. This explains why many non-conformist records are held at The National Archives with only microfilmed copies of Buckinghamshire registers at the Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies. Most of these records have been indexed on the IGI (International Genealogical Index/ Family Search) the index created by the Church of the Latter Day Saints. The registers not indexed on the IGI, were the burials and the Quaker records.

Indexes and the images for all the registers are now online at BMD REGISTERS
The full list of church registers and separate non-conformist burial grounds held at THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
The National Archives GUIDE to nonconformist records.


THE CATHOLIC NATIONAL LIBRARY at Farnborough Abbey holds some listed transcripts of burial registers. THE CATHOLIC FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY and THE CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF NORTHAMPTON maybe able to help locate records,  which for Catholic churches may often remain with the church.   
The National Archives guide to CATHOLIC records. 


A small number of gravestones in churchyards within Buckinghamshire that have been photographed and indexed on GRAVESTONE PHOTOGRAPHIC RESOURCE

Find a Grave coverage for BUCKINGHAMSHIRE




COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION has an online database for those who died in the two World Wars some of whom have gravestones in the country
THE WAR GRAVES PHOTOGRAPHIC PROJECTworks in association with the CWGC photographing gravestones


BUCKINGHAMSHIRE REMEMBERS is a website with photographs and transcriptions of Buckinghamshire’s war memorials.
LEST WE FORGET has photographs and transcriptions of Buckinghamshire war memorials with a few pre First World War memorials.   



GENUKI has some transcriptions of monumental inscriptions in Buckinghamshire churches/churchyards.

REGISTER OF ENGLISH MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS first published in 1912 includes the churches of Bradenham, Fingest, Great Woolstone, Little Missenden, Little Woolstone, Stoke Hammond and Walton

There is an online list and transcription of monumental inscriptions for the church of ALL SAINTS CALVERTON

HANSLOPE AND DISTRICT HISTORICAL SOCIETY have an online master index which includes burials


There are a few online publications largely of early C20th publications of the Buckinghamshire Parish Register Society for transcriptions of parish registers.

CHESHAM 1538-1636

DRAYTON PARSLOW 1559-1837

STOKES POGES 1563-1763

THORNTON 1562-1812 



If anyone knows of any other online Buckinghamshire burial resources please send me a pm




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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 15 January 11 17:22 GMT (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE



CIVIC CEMETERIES



Present day Buckinghamshire has three tiers of administration. The County Council is responsible for services across the whole county. The second tier of administration is the four District Councils who are responsible for the main services within their own areas. The four Buckinghamshire district councils are

AYLESBURY VALE
CHILTERN
SOUTH BUCKS
WYCOMBE

The third tier of administration and most local, is the town and parish councils. Each of the four district councils has town and parish councils. There are presently 166 parish or town councils in Buckinghamshire. Some of these councils maintain their own cemeteries and may help to maintain their local churchyard. The records of burials in churchyards are found in the church registers. The records for burials or cremations in civic cemeteries are held by the district, town or parish councils.

The Unitary Authority of Milton Keynes is now a separately administered authority and is no longer part of the county of Buckinghamshire.


BUCKINGHAMSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL has an online map of the four District Councils. Clicking on the map links to the relevant district council cemetery web pages.
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL website also has a map of all the civil parishes in present day Buckinghamshire.



BRITISH TOWNS AND VILLAGES NETWORK website is very useful in helping to navigate a map of modern day Buckinghamshire, showing the four Buckinghamshire District Councils and the now separate (since 1997) Unitary Authority of Milton Keynes and the individual places within each.


Every inhabitant of a parish had a right to be buried in their parish churchyard or burial ground. With the closing of churchyards in urban areas many families could not afford the expense of a cemetery plot, let alone a gravestone. Such burials would be in common graves which contained other unrelated interments. Burial in a common grave was not synonymous with a pauper funeral. It did not mean the funeral itself was not paid for by the family. Cremations became increasingly common after the Second World War when more crematoriums were opened. Cemeteries with crematoriums keep separate burial and cremation registers.
Cemetery burial registers usually give the name of the deceased, age, abode and occupation, the date of death and of burial, and the position of the grave. These records are arranged chronologically, and are not indexed alphabetically, though some cemeteries may have some computerised indexes. If a private grave was purchased those records indicate who purchased the plot, their address, when it was purchased and whether a gravestone was erected (though not whether it survives). The records will also indicate who else was buried in the plot, when and at what depths.



The following is a list of civic cemeteries in the areas of each of the Buckinghamshire District Councils and the Unitary Authority of Milton Keynes. The date of the opening of each cemetery is given with a website contact where that can be found.

If anyone knows of any others please send me a pm



AYLESBURY VALE DISTRICT COUNCIL
The district council does not directly provide any public cemeteries. Cemeteries in the area are administered by town or parish councils.



AYLESBURY TOWN COUNCIL
Tring Road Cemetery, Tring Road, Aylesbury HP20 (1858)
CENTRE FOR BUCKINGHAMSHIRE STUDIES holds the registers for the Tring Road Aylesbury Cemetery 1858-1961


BUCKINGHAM TOWN COUNCIL
Brackley Road Cemetery, Brackley Road, Buckingham MK18 (1856)


EDLESBOROUGH PARISH COUNCIL
Edlesborough Parish Council Cemetery, Church End, Leighton Road, Edlesborough LU6 (1990)


MARSH GIBBON PARISH COUNCIL
Marsh Gibbon Cemetery, Clements Lane, Marsh Gibbon OX27 (1954)


STEWKLEY PARISH COUNCIL
Stewkley Lawn Cemetery, High Street North Stewkley LU7 (1986)


STOKE MANDEVILLE PARISH COUNCIL
Stoke Mandeville Burial Ground, Swallow Lane, Stokemandeville HP22 (1937)


TINGEWICK PARISH COUNCIL
Tingewick Cemetery, Water Stratford Road, Tingewick MK18 (1900)
Further information on Tingewick cemetery at ROOTSWEB


WINSLOW TOWN COUNCIL
Winslow Burial Ground, Furze Lane, Winslow MK18 (1992)



Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 15 January 11 17:32 GMT (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE



CIVIC CEMETERIES




CHILTERN DISTRICT COUNCILThe council administers one cemetery jointly with a parish council. Other cemeteries in the area are administered by town or parish councils.
The cemetery at Great Missenden is jointly administered by the District Council and GREAT MISSENDEN PARISH COUNCIL
The Lawn Cemetery, Church Lane, Great Missenden HP16 (1945)



AMERSHAM TOWN COUNCIL
St Mary's Cemetery, Church Mead, Amersham HP7 (1859)
The Platt Cemetery, The Platt, Amersham HP7 (1859)
Stanley Hill Cemetery, Stanley Hill, Amersham HP7 (1952)


CHALFONT ST GILES PARISH COUNCIL
Bowstridge Lane Cemetery, Bowstridge Lane, Chalfont St Giles HP8 (1945)


CHALFONT ST PETERS PARISH COUNCIL
Chalfont St Peters Garden of Rest, Denham Lane, Chalfont St Peters SL9 (1943)
A list of surnames of those buried is included


CHESHAM TOWN COUNCIL
Chesham Cemetery, Bellingdon Road, Chesham HP5 (1858)


CHESHAM BOIS PARISH COUNCIL
Chesham Bois Burial Ground, Bois Moor Road, Chesham Bois HP5 (1924)


LATIMER PARISH COUNCIL
Tyler’s Hill Burial Ground, Tyler’s Hill Road, Botley, Chesham HP5 (1906)


SEER GREEN PARISH COUNCIL
Seer Green Cemetery, School Lane, Seer Green HP9 (1940)




SOUTH BUCKS DISTRICT COUNCIL
The council administers all the cemeteries of which there are three and a Garden of Remembrance.
Shepherds Lane Cemetery, Shepherds Lane, Beaconsfield HP9 (1907) 
Holtspur Cemetery, Broad Lane, Beaconsfield HP9 (1954)
Park Side Cemetery, Windsor Road, Gerrards Cross SL9 (1965)
Stoke Poges Memorial Gardens (cremated remains only) Church Lane Stoke Poges SL2 (1937)




WYCOMBE DISTRICT COUNCIL
The council administers one cemetery. Other cemeteries in the area are administered by town or parish councils.
High Wycombe Cemetery, Hampden Road, High Wycombe HP13 (1855)



CHEPPING WYCOMBE PARISH COUNCIL
Altona Road Cemetery, Loudwater, High Wycombe HP10 (1924)
Hammersley Lane Cemetery, Tylers Green, High Wycombe HP13 (1953)
Cock Lane Cemetery, Tylers Green, High Wycombe HP13 (1968)


HUGHENDEN PARISH COUNCIL
Garden of Rest, Four Ashes Road, Cryers Hill, Hughenden HP15 (1965)


LACEY GREEN PARISH COUNCIL
Garden of Rest, Main Road, Lacey Green HP27 (1937)
Formerly this was a Methodist Cemetery. The management of the cemetery transferred to the parish council in 2006


LITTLE MARLOW PARISH COUNCIL
Little Marlow Cemetery, Fern Lane, Little Marlow SL7 (1899)


MARLOW TOWN COUNCIL
Marlow Town Cemetery, Wethered Road, Marlow SL7 (1910)


PRINCES RISBOROUGH TOWN COUNCIL
Stratton Memorial Garden and burial ground, Church Lane, Princes Risborough HP27 (2009)


STOKENCHURCH PARISH COUNCIL
Stokenchurch Cemetery, Church Street, Stokenchurch HP14 (1984)


WEST WYCOMBE PARISH COUNCIL
West Wycombe Burial Ground High Street, West Wycombe HP14 (2000)
A list of names of those buried is included


WOOBURN AND BOURNE END PARISH COUNCIL
Wooburn Cemetery, Town Lane, Wooburn HP10 (1923)




CHILTERN CREMATORIUM JOINT COMMITTEE
The joint committee administers Chiltern Crematorium on behalf of Aylesbury Vale, Chiltern and Wycombe District Councils.
Chilterns Crematorium, Whielden Lane, Amersham HP7 (1966)




Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 15 January 11 17:34 GMT (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE




CIVIC CEMETERIES




UNITARY AUTHORITY OF MILTON KEYNES

Whalley Drive Cemetery, Bletchley MK3 (1947)

Selbourne Avenue Cemetery, Selbourne Avenue, Bletchley MK3 (2005)

Crownhill Cemetery and Crematorium, Dansteed Way, Crownhill MK8 (1982)

Manor Road Cemetery, Fenny Stratford, Milton Keynes, Bucks, MK2 (1860)

Newport Road Cemetery, New Bradwell MK14 (1914)

Ousebank Cemetery, Ousebank Street, Newport Pagnell MK16 (1866?) burials were known to have begun on this site during the civil war in the C17th but records only survive from the C19th.

Tickford Street Cemetery, Tickford Street, Newport Pagnell MK16 (1927)

Calverton Road Cemetery, Stony Stratford MK11 (1857)

London Road Cemetery, Stony Stratford MK11 (1911)

Woburn Avenue Cemetery, Wolverton MK12 (1896)





INDEPENDENTLY MANAGED CEMETERIES IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE


WOODLAND BURIAL PARKS
Chiltern Woodland Burial Park, Potkiln Lane, Jordans, Beaconsfield HP9 (2009)


THE GREEN BURIAL COMPANY
Olney Green Burial Ground Yardley Road, Olney MK46 (2000)





St John’s Hospital Cemetery (Buckinghamshire County Asylum) Oxford Road, Stone HP17 (1871-1990)
Burial records for the dates given are held at CENTRE FOR BUCKINGHAMSHIRE STUDIES



Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE
« Reply #5 on: Saturday 15 January 11 17:44 GMT (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE




WHO MIGHT BE MISSING FROM CHURCH OF ENGLAND BURIAL REGISTERS?




UNINTENTIONALLY MISSING


In 1538, a law was passed in England, which required the clergy to keep a record of baptisms, marriages, and burials, which would be recorded every Sunday after services. A further notice was sent out to churches in 1558, but compliance was still not uniform. In 1597 it was required that any existing records should be copied into a book (the parish register). There was some opposition from parish clergy. Some copied what records the parish had amassed into the new register, some copied some of the records and some did nothing starting their parish register from 1598. Not all parish registers survive from this period and because records were rarely written up on the day they occurred, not all events were remembered and written into the registers, particularly in smaller parishes lacking a resident minister.

In 1598, parishes were ordered to make annual returns of their baptisms, marriages, and burials to their local bishop. These are known as Bishops Transcripts and where obligatory up until the mid-nineteenth century. Not all parishes complied with the requirement on a regular basis and not all the transcripts have survived. Where they have, they serve as a useful check against the actual registers themselves. Not all entries in the parish registers are found in the Bishops Transcripts and sometimes records in the BTs are not found in the parish registers.


The English civil war lasted from1641-1651. The country was without a monarchy until the restoration of Charles II in 1660. Parish registers may only be fragmentary throughout this twenty-year period.



Institutions such as workhouses, asylums, and military hospitals often had their own burial grounds, particularly in the nineteenth century. With the building of municipal cemeteries from the 1840s onwards in towns and cities and the growing popularity of cremation, particularly from the twentieth century onwards, most burials and cremations in this country no longer occurred in churchyards, apart from in the more rural areas of England. Memorial services, in more modern times, might be listed in parish church registers if they are held in a church prior to a burial in a municipal cemetery. Such entries usually but not always give the actual burial location. A cremation would rarely be noted in a church burial register unless the ashes were buried in the churchyard later and then an entry should be made in the register.



Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 15 January 11 17:55 GMT (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE




WHO MIGHT BE MISSING FROM CHURCH OF ENGLAND BURIAL REGISTERS?



INTENTIONALLY MISSING



The Church forbade the ceremonial interment of all excommunicated or unbaptized persons as well as suicides, though it was more sympathetic towards those suicides considered ‘bereft of reason’. Non-conformists were entitled to burial in the parish churchyard. The insertion of all such burials in the registers was often only fitful and irregular, though such burials did occur nevertheless.



UNBAPTISED


Unbaptised and stillborn babies can be found intermittently in even the earliest Church of England registers showing they were buried in churchyards, but more likely at the edges and in unconsecrated ground because they were not entitled to the full church rites of burial. Many of these burials went unrecorded in registers.

For parents who have experienced stillbirths this remains quite rightly a very sensitive subject, since attitudes to stillbirths were slow to change until well into the second half of the twentieth century ANSWERS.COM



NON-CONFORMISTS


By 1851, about a quarter of the population was non-conformist. Non-conformists were dissenters who disagreed with the beliefs and practices of the Church of England. They might be Protestants e.g. Presbyterians, Baptists, Methodists, Independents, Congregationalists and Quakers or Roman Catholics. Some non-conformist chapels had their own burial grounds, but burials for many non-conformists still took place in parish churchyards, until the larger towns and cities had established their own municipal cemeteries from the 1840s onwards. In 1880, the Burial Laws Amendment Act allowed for the burial of non-conformists by their own ministers in Anglican churchyards. Where burials did take place in non-conformist burial grounds, the survival rate of these registers, if they ever existed, is much poorer than Church of England registers.


The example below is taken from the ANNOTATED BURIALS AT WESTBURY ON SEVERN 1889-1895

In this register, the vicar gave far greater information than the standard requirement for burial registers of the period. In the register is mentioned the service conducted for a man who had committed suicide and the burial of three unnamed non-conformists, demonstrating that in a standard Church of England burial register these would have gone unrecorded

'18 Dec 1890 Memorandum that there had been 3 other persons buried by Sectaries this year whose names are not entered in this book'






Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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Re: A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 19 February 11 15:31 GMT (UK) »

A GUIDE TO BURIALS IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE




WHO MIGHT BE MISSING FROM CHURCH OF ENGLAND BURIAL REGISTERS?



INTENTIONALLY MISSING



SUICIDES


Suicide ‘whilst of sound mind’ was considered by the state to be a serious crime. A suicide’s property could be forfeited to the crown. The church considered suicide ‘whilst of sound mind’ a mortal sin. It was customary in England to bury suicides at cross roads, but not infrequently for charity's sake, the body was interred in the graveyard without ceremony. Coroner’s juries were often sympathetic and returned verdicts of ‘suicide while of unsound mind’. Better to be judged mad than a criminal and denied a Christian burial. If the jury returned the rarer verdict of 'felo de se', felon of himself, the suicide was deemed a felon and their property was confiscated.

Though in the context of the suicide of Ophelia in Shakespeare’s play Hamlet, SHAKESPEARE LAW LIBRARY has an informative article on the church’s response to the burials of suicides

Penalties against suicides and their families were gradually reduced throughout the nineteenth century. In 1823, the Right to Burial Act allowed for the burial of felo de se suicides in the churchyard. In 1870, the Abolition of Forfeiture Act removed the penalty of forfeiting the suicide’s property to the Crown. No religious ceremony could be obtained for a felo de se until the Burial Laws Amendment Act of 1880, though the full burial service was still denied them and until 1882; the suicide’s body was buried privately between the hours of nine and twelve at night. Under the Suicide Act of 1961, suicide no longer became a crime, though assisting someone to commit suicide still is. The Church of England proposed Book of Common Prayer (1928) began the order for the burial of the dead with this statement.

'Here it is to be noted that the Office ensuing is not to be used for any that die unbaptized, or for any that are excommunicate, or have laid violent hands upon themselves, or in the act of committing any grievous crime.
If question arise as to whether this Office should be used for the burial of any person, reference shall (if time and opportunity permit,) be made to the Bishop, who shall decide the question.'




EXCOMMUNICANTS


The Church of England could excommunicate parishioners for many moral offences, as well as heresy. A modified form of the burial service was available for excommunicants following the Burial Laws Amendment Act of 1880, though this was merely the formalisation of the process where sympathetic clergymen absolved deceased excommunicants and read the normal burial service. Those who were excommunicated because they had committed a grievous crime, if they died unrepentant, would be deprived of the normal burial service. From 1745 onwards the relatives of excommunicants, where necessary, could compel their burial in a churchyard.



CRIMINALS


Taken from THE HISTORY OF JUDICIAL HANGING IN BRITAIN 1735–1964

‘From 1752 the bodies of executed murderers were not returned to their relatives for burial. Up to 1832, except in a case of murderers where the court had ordered dissection or gibbeting it was usual for the criminal's body to be claimed by friends or relatives for burial. This burial could take place in consecrated ground provided that the person had not committed murder. In earlier times (pre 1752) it was not unusual for murderers to be buried under the gallows on which they had suffered. Dissection was removed from the statute book on the 1st of August 1832, by the Anatomy Act. The same act directed that the bodies of executed criminals belonged to the Crown and were now to be buried in the prison grounds in unmarked graves, often several to a grave to save space. Typically, the person was placed into a cheap pine coffin or even a sack and covered with quicklime, which was thought to hasten the process of decomposition of the body. This practice was later abandoned, as the quicklime was found to have a preserving effect. The Capital Punishment Amendment Act of 1868 required that a formal inquest be held after an execution and that the prisoner be buried within the grounds of the prison unless directed otherwise by the sheriff of the county. This practice continued up to abolition. After the inquest, the body was placed into the coffin, which had large holes bored in the sides and ends. The burial normally took place at lunchtime and was carried out by prison officers and overseen by the chaplain who conducted a simple burial service. The position of the grave was recorded in the Burial Register for the prison. Prisons in major cities soon had quite large graveyard areas. Where prisons were demolished for redevelopment the bodies were removed and buried elsewhere, normally in consecrated ground.’




Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk