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Author Topic: 12th Regiment of Foot  (Read 1567 times)

Offline brina

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12th Regiment of Foot
« on: Friday 27 April 12 18:18 BST (UK) »
I've just discovered that my husband's great great grandfather served in the 12th Regiment of Foot between 1844 and 1853.   I have his attestation paper which I downloaded last night.   It mentions that he served in Mauritius (nearly 5 years)and Cape of Good Hope (nearly 2 years).   That's all fine but when I was trying to find out more about the 12th it all gets a bit confusing.   Is this all the regiment is called or is it sometimes called something else.  Can anyone help and would anyone know the best place to do some more research on what was happening with the regiment at that time.

Moderator - hope this is the correct place for this query - if not I would be obliged if you could direct me to where it should be.
Thank you in advance. :)  Brina



Offline neil1821

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Re: 12th Regiment of Foot
« Reply #1 on: Friday 27 April 12 18:28 BST (UK) »
12th (East Suffolk) Regiment was their full title.
After the reforms of 1881 they dropped the number and became the Suffolk Regiment, so you may find some information by googling the latter name.

AT the time in question they had a 1st battalion and a reserve battalion.
What was your ancestor's name?
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Offline millymcb

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Re: 12th Regiment of Foot
« Reply #2 on: Friday 27 April 12 18:55 BST (UK) »
Given those locations it looks like it was the Reserve Battalion rather than the 1st.

RESERVE BATTALION
1842.04 Reserve Battalion, 12th (the East Suffolk) Regiment of Foot were raised at Sunderland by separation of four companies of 1st Battalion
 
1842 England: Sunderland   
         South Africa   
         Mauritius   
1851 Cape Colony   
1852 (Feb 1852) HMS Birkenhead sinking off Cape Coast. Draft on way to join Reserve Bn.Lives lost   
1852 Kaffir War   
1853 Cape Colony

1st BATTALION
1842.04 1st Battalion, 12th (the East Suffolk) Regiment of Foot redesignated on formation of Reserve Battalion
  1847 England   
  1852 Ireland   
  1854 Australia   


Good website for Suffolk Regt history here which has details of the HMS Birkenhead incident.  If you check your dates for when he was in Cape Colony (cape of Good Hope) you'll see whether he was already there by then.
http://www.suffolkregiment.org/Suffolk_History.html
 

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Offline bowman

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Re: 12th Regiment of Foot
« Reply #3 on: Friday 27 April 12 19:49 BST (UK) »
If you should require further info regarding Army Regiments prior to 1881 this link might help


http://www.colonialwargaming.co.uk/Miscellany/Army/Cardwell.htm


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Offline brina

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Re: 12th Regiment of Foot
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 28 April 12 09:54 BST (UK) »
Many many thanks.   

Our ancestor's name was Reuben Williams and he joined up in 1844 at Parkhurst Barracks.  He was from Farley in Wiltshire.  He was a private and was discharged after breaking his arm and damaged his elbow joint rendering him unfit to carry out the duties of a soldier.   We think that it says he broke his arm as a result of "falling from his master's horse" that's what it looks like but it is a funny way of putting it I think.

I love these attestation papers they provide so much information.

Brina :)