Author Topic: White Smith  (Read 1191 times)

Offline honeybun

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White Smith
« on: Monday 23 May 05 16:38 BST (UK) »
I have just come across a relative who occupation was "White Smith".  Any ideas please?

Honeybun
Buckett, Woolton: Kent
Buckett: Hampshire and Surrey
Taylor: Wigan
Preece: Herefordshire

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Offline Hackstaple

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Re: White Smith
« Reply #1 on: Monday 23 May 05 16:46 BST (UK) »
Whitesmith - a worker in tin. 8)
Southern or Southan [Hereford , Monmouthshire & Glos], Jenkins, Meredith and Morgan [Monmouthshire and Glos.], Murrill, Damary, Damry, Ray, Lawrence [all Middx. & London], Nethway from Kenn or Yatton. Also Riley and Lyons in South Africa and Riley from St. Helena.
Any census information included in this post is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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Offline honeybun

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Re: White Smith
« Reply #2 on: Monday 23 May 05 17:06 BST (UK) »
Thanks Hackstaple - nice to see you back.

I've just seen the posting about Brightsmith too.

Honeybun
Buckett, Woolton: Kent
Buckett: Hampshire and Surrey
Taylor: Wigan
Preece: Herefordshire

Offline percy

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Re: White Smith
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday 24 May 05 13:32 BST (UK) »

Hi Honeybun,

Whitesmiths were 'workers in tin' --- for example they 'tinned' the insides of copper, iron, and other cooking vessels.

But the term was also used indiscriminately of PEWTER makers/workers : and when "Britannia Metal" -- a form of pewter --- came into use in the late 18th early 19th century,  BM workers were also called whitesmiths.

What period , and location, was your whitesmith ?    In the 19th Century, Sheffield and Birmingham were the main centres of Britannia Metal making ------ but the simple tinning if cooking vessels was even carried out locally by itinerant 'Tinkers'.

PERCY 
HEWITT :  ROSA : (FULLER)SANDYS  :

Offline honeybun

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Re: White Smith
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday 24 May 05 14:04 BST (UK) »
Hi Percy

This man was born in Suffolk, but was living in Kent in 1861 with his family (all born in Kent) so perhaps he mended pots and pans for a living.  He had been in Kent for at least 20 years but I don't know where he was before then or where he learnt his trade.

Thanks for the extra information anyway - it all gets filed away for future reference!

Honeybun


Buckett, Woolton: Kent
Buckett: Hampshire and Surrey
Taylor: Wigan
Preece: Herefordshire

Offline percy

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Re: White Smith
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday 24 May 05 14:44 BST (UK) »

In the period and area you mention, your man would NOT have been a Britannia Metal worker, and is VERY unlikely to have been a pewter maker.   No mention under the Bs in the Bible of pewter makers, Cotterell.

Most likely he 'tinned' the inside of metal cooking vessels : 'galvanized' ironwork  --- then a major source of new 'whitesmith' work ---- and/or repaired damaged pewterware.

Percy
HEWITT :  ROSA : (FULLER)SANDYS  :

Offline Ex-pat

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Re: White Smith
« Reply #6 on: Monday 30 May 05 13:36 BST (UK) »
Just off the cuff:- a whitesmith was also known as a tinsmith, because he made a variety of items from tin sheeting.
Among the many and varied items he made were waterbottles for miners, dishes of varied sizes, lunch cans, just to name a few.
Ex-pat

Offline G Mlx

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Re: White Smith
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 13 January 18 14:54 GMT (UK) »
Whitesmiths worked with cold metal, while blacksmiths worked hot metal