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Author Topic: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong  (Read 21253 times)

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« on: Thursday 11 April 13 00:13 BST (UK) »
http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php/topic,158938.new.html#new

Daniel Collingwood, Edward Henry's GREAT GREAT Grandson


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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #1 on: Friday 12 April 13 23:13 BST (UK) »
{Where they weep and suffer and sin no more }
Old Hong Kong

DEATH AND BURIAL OF EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD  24th October-1878

Inscriptions for cemetery sections 17-47
... of given rows and columns within each section. "Inscription" shows the text copied from the inscription on the gravestone. ...
Edward Collingwood/ carpenter British ship Dhaewar/ born at Blackway/ died at Hong Kong 24th October 1878/ aged 51 years/ this stone is erected by his/ shipmates as a mark of esteem where they weep and suffer and sin no more. 29---/01/20- Edward Collingwood/ carpenter British ship Dhaewar/ born ...?

https://service.mail.com/dereferrer/?target=http%3A%2F%2Fgwulo.com%2Fnode%2F8741&lang=en

List of Burials ordered by Name
... a note of the Plot for a given grave, you can look up its inscription. See the pages listed in the menu at the top-left corner of this ... Collingwood Edward 1878-10-24 51 5930 29---/01/20-
~~~~~~~~------------------
?(Born Blackwall aged 61-)

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #2 on: Friday 12 April 13 23:35 BST (UK) »
Tuckers Court Alley was at the most southern end of Dingle Lane and Dolphin Lane. Adjacent to Tuckers court in proximity to the Poplar Workhouse was an open sewer running straight into the W.India dock. This 'open' sewer was a link to the 18th century and endured the name "Rolling Turd Alley"
From here it was just a short 10mins WALK to West India Docks and the famous ship building DUNBAR WHARF in Fore Street (now Narrow St, Limehouse and the infamous Ropemakers Fields) where Edward Henry and his dad (John the ropemaker) WORKED as a shipwright, probably until Duncan Dunbar died in 1862. It seems from here Edward moved to Cawdor Street closer to the East India Docks where he could embark on his many ship voyages.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=46471

Dingle Lane and Dingle Lane School (demolished).

Dingle Lane, to the east of No. 30, was one of the ways from the High Street to the Isle of Dogs until the southern part was removed by the construction of the West India Docks. There was some building along it by the early eighteenth century, (ref. 357) and in the early nineteenth century Tucker's Court (begun by Thomas Hale) and Dingle Court were built on its south side. (ref. 358) They consisted of a double row of 14 back-to-back two-storey cottages, each with two rooms and a kitchen or scullery.


http://www.merchantnetworks.com.au/periods/1800after/1800dunbar.htm

Edward and John were very well paid in the employ of Duncan Dunbar.....nb  shipwrights the ships tariff of 64 shares divided among crew...remnants of days of  (piracy?). A ships carpenter below 1st mate was the second best paid job on ships compliment.
The great ship builders of the 17th and 18th centuries came from Durham and Scotland. The Collingwoods of Durham were mostly sea farers, 'MASTER MARINERS' AND ship builders and came to London after the English Civil WAR...A line of Collingwoods held office as The High Sheriffs of Northumberland, more research is needed to find our connections here.
BUT one thing stands out...the early Collingwoods of the 15th to the 18th centuries, the Williams, the Johns and Edwards all seem to be wealthier than their later shipworking descendants.
They came to London and spread throughout the World and some made money from legal or illegal piracy/privateering. There is scant evidence that this 'bounty' the pirates share has been used to finance the apprenticeships of their descendants and many traditions of the Golden Age of the Pirates have been carried down through three centuries into the shipping industry ! The pirates 'code' of sharing the bounty and helping those on board that become retired through ill health or injury lends this tradition as a forerunner to today's unions! How else did they make the money in those days for highly skilled training of shipwrights and in some cases the financing of 'Victuallers Stores' and Inns around the Wapping and Ratcliffe areas of Stepney? How did they form the 'closed' shop of the father to son in the Dock Trade and the Guilds of Shipwrights, Sawyers, Cordwainers and Ropemakers?
Admiral Nelson utilized Swedish ropemaking techniques to be used in the roperies of Limehouse and a contingency of Swedish volunteers enlisted on Nelson's ships at Trafalgar to maintain the correct application of roping....there is something quite intriguing  about our historical past in the ship and dock trades, my research may take me further...

Daniel Collingwood, Edward Henry's direct Great-Great-Grandson

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #3 on: Friday 12 April 13 23:47 BST (UK) »
http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18480515-1350&div=t18480515-1350&terms=EDWARD|HENRY|COLLINGWOOD#highlight

EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD. I am in the employ of a shipwright I was employed in taking some copper off the ship Earl Grey, belonging to Mr. Duncan Dunbar—I threw the copper on the punt—I can swear to all this copper, except two pieces—it came off that ship—two of these pieces in particular I can swear to, and the other I have no doubt of—they were all in the punt, which was under the ship's acting as a stage for me to work at the vessel—I know this piece by my own marking on it, and this one by its acting as a brace under the pump case.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=46508

Edward Henry's father was John Collingwood, 1776 - 1821.

..he was only 45yrs and i believe  he died from a lung related illness from his trade as a ropemaker?
John Tucker's whitelead paint yard was almost within the ropeyards .Ropes were
tarred for protection against seawater and the mills were within the
same 'yards.' Most industry workers died of lung diseases especially
those involving tarring and whitelead paintmaking. I'm only guessing
but at around 1810 the rope industry was tough and i think John took
work close to his home  in Tuckers Court Alley where his son Edward
Henry also grew up and worked as a shipwright. Edward  moved closer to
the East India Docks so that he could embark to sea from there working
on ships and to escape the perils his dad endured with dangerous
chemicals. Edward was 4yrs old when his dad John died in 1821. He moved to No.6 Cawdor St, WHICH is covered by the entrance of the Blackwall Tunnel Approach, A12 (part of the old
Brunswick Rd, that runs to my dad's last home in St Leonards St. E3
As far as i can deduce Edward moved from Cawdor St, to Ellerthorpe St, which was cleared in 1951 for the new Lansbury Market project. Ellerthorpe St continued on from Ricardo St,THROUGH TO THE CURRENT market entrance.
His children, ie my Great-grandfather, Alfred Daniel,b 1846 were i believed born at Tuckers Court Alley.This place was close to the Poplar Workhouse and was also home for some rough 'Irish Cockneys'.
My grand father Alfred Daniel, b 1879 was never seen by his grandfather Edward Henry who died in Hong Kong the year before he was born, 1878. I am trying to establish the Collingwood connections with historical events eg the English Civil War, The High Sheriffs of Northumberland, Trafalgar, the pubs around Wapping, and the possibility that some may have sailed on pirate ships including Captain William Kydd.

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 13 April 13 00:17 BST (UK) »
Edward Colliness
John Collings.
Seafarers
These are two members of William Kidd's crew. I make no excuse or fanciful claims that any of our ancestors sailed with Kidd but many so called pirates were in fact hired as privateers, a legal term used to plunder for the Realm. Family men and fathers and sons or brothers often joined up for a chance to make a one off trip to a fortune !

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/handcousins/message/6821

Most people were illiterate and couldn't even spell their own names. Seafarers, EMBARKING
on a get rich quick journey with promises of a share of the 'bounty' of a PRIVATEER, often did so with a certain amount of caution should their captain (and therefore , crew) be outlawed?
IT wasn't unusual for crew to enlist using a synonym or a slight change of name, just in case they jumped ship in some obscure port or transferred to a homeward bound ship?

Most people that could not write or spell often used 'x' or partial spelling of the name!
Collingwoods, Collingsworths often shortened to plain Collins or Collings.

 I have never heard of Colliness, this name is rare, yet an Edward Colliness and John Collings sailed with KIDD?  Were they brothers or father and son? Was Collings really John Collingwood that married Mary Barker at St.Dunstans, in 1697 ?
Did he change ship and return to England by request of KIDD for those that feared prosecution?  There is evidence that some of the crew changed to a plundered Danish merchant ship off the West Coast of Africa after KIDD killed John Moore with a wooden bucket, in disgust at Kidd's crime (for which he was eventually hanged)
Did he witness the execution of KIDD at Wapping in 1701 ?
Many fanciful questions but with more research we may learn more.

I believe that John Collingwood that married Mary Barker at St.Dunstans, in 1697 ndand was the first of the Collingwoods to be mentioned at St Dunstons a may be John the Sawyer's (1737-1796) grandfather (the father is listed as an upholsterer), the missing link?



Edward Henry's GREAT GREAT Grandfather could have sailed with William Kidd, got his pirates 'share' and profited to good purpose.

Edward Henry is my direct GREAT GREAT Grandfather ....and we can dream, as they must have done ?

http://brethrencoast.com/bio/William_Kidd.html

http://www.nintendoplayer.com/Pirates!/realpirates.htm

http://www.thewayofthepirates.com/famous-pirates/william-kidd.php

enjoy...Daniel

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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The Collingwood High Sheriffs of Northumberland
« Reply #5 on: Sunday 14 April 13 22:07 BST (UK) »
THE HIGH SHERIFFS OF NORTHUMBERLAND from the 11th century
to the present day
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Sheriff_of_Northumberland

1544 Sir John Collingwood of Eslington Hall
1551 Sir Robert Collingwood of Eslington Hall
1568 Cuthbert Collingwood
1580 Cuthbert Collingwood
1647 Edward Collingwood of Dissington Hall
1697 Edward Collingwood of Dissington Hall
1725 Alexander Collingwood of Little Ryle
1761 Alexander Collingwood of Unthank Hall
1766 Henry Collingwood of Cornhill
1787 Edward Collingwood of Chirton Hall
1793 Henry Collingwood of Liburn Tower
http://www.british-towns.net/sh/statelyhomes_album.asp?GetPic=48

1824 Edward Collingwood of Dissington Hall
1832 Henry John William Collingwood of Liburn Tower
1844 Edward John Collingwood of Liburn Tower
1919 Edward Gordon Collingwood of Dissington Hall
1937 Edward Foyle Collingwood of Liburn Tower

Researchers tracing back our line of Collingwoods may find this helpful
Sir Daniel Collingwood of Brandon
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=-RtNAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA17&lpg=PA17&dq=Sir+Daniel+Collingwood&source=bl&ots=4sJnAmf48I&sig=WKBQPuEIK4nbcJsP2ujU87wW99A&hl=en&sa=X&ei=oRhrUYvYNMiV0QXopICQAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Sir%20Daniel%20Collingwood&f=false

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=k9wKAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA336&lpg=PA336&dq=Sir+Daniel+Collingwood&source=bl&ots=5U9Yr5vR8p&sig=DwSBuM-96dy_3F8e7GV9u4wUPyY&hl=en&sa=X&ei=oRhrUYvYNMiV0QXopICQAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CD0Q6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Sir%20Daniel%20Collingwood&f=false

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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John Edward Collingwood 0f Lilbun Tower
« Reply #6 on: Friday 19 April 13 21:49 BST (UK) »
Edward John Collingwood1
M, #360705, d. 20 February 1895
http://www.thepeerage.com/p36071.htm

     Edward John Collingwood married Anna Burdett, daughter of Arthur Burdett and Anna Ripley, on 23 August 1842.1 He died on 20 February 1895.1
     He lived at Churton House, Northumberland, England.1 He lived at Lilburn Tower, Northumberland, England.1
Citations
[S47] Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, editor, Burke's Irish Family Records (London, U.K.: Burkes Peerage Ltd, 1976), page 182. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Irish Family Records.

http://www.british-towns.net/sh/statelyhomes_album.asp?GetPic=48

The High Sheriffs of Northumberland from the 11th century to the present of which 16 Collingwoods held office between 1544 to 1937

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Sheriff_of_Northumberland

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 20 April 13 21:56 BST (UK) »
I have been trying to establish how my G-G-Grandpa, Edward Henry Collingwood died and have not had a lot of success except his demise and burial in Hong Kong. What follows is supposition...I have heard of stories that he died at sea and probably did, however, his job as a shipwright would have took him to all sectors of ship maintenance including upkeep of timbers, decking, outboard rigging, fixtures and repairs to the hull. He could have been working on the outside of the hull suspended by rope-tackle or a safety harness.
IF this was emergency repairs and out at sea he could have slipped his harness into the sea and drowned but the question remains...how did he get recovered by his shipmates. Unless he was still attached to ropes and they pulled him in,either dead or died later.
If they were well out at sea, say, more than 4 days from port, then most likely he would have been buried at sea. We know he was buried in Hong Kong, so the ship was either close in to port or actually in port.
 IF hull-ship repairs are not too urgent they are usually done when port is reached.
I believe he died in port by falling into the sea whilst repairing the hull. He could have been fatally injured while falling from his harness. He may simply have died through sickness or ill health?
It may have been some time before his body was found floating in the Hong Kong harbour.

Lastly...his closest shipmates, possibly two and the First Mate would have passed the news on to his family in person many, many months after his death when the ship arrived back, if it did. Maybe a couple of his 'mates' embarked back to England on another ship to give the news to his children* living at Blackwall, Ellerthorpe St?
 The last port of call for the Dhaewar may not have been Hong Kong. Either way ships sailing to the Middle and Far east would have been on a round trip of 12 -18 months or more if sailing to the newest colony, Australia, especially if transportees (prisoners) were on board?

*I believe Edward's wife,Ann Merritt died in 1876 ? His son Alfred Daniel appears to have been by now, the head of the household at 11, Ellerthorpe St or Dee St at this time.
This could explain the theory that he died in 1880...the delay in getting news back home?

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Edward Henry Collingwood - The Blackwall Frigates
« Reply #8 on: Sunday 28 April 13 23:41 BST (UK) »
A charming and wonderful account of the Blackwall Frigates: by Basil Lubbock of hurried journeys and of the quest for adventure and the lust of gold. The Dunbar ships and Money Wigram.

(click at bottom of each page to read more)

Dicky Green.

The famous Dicky Green, the elder of the two
brothers, R. and H. Green, was an example of the very
best type of private shipowner. His name was known
and revered in shipping circles all over the world.

The bronze statue before the Public Baths in the East
India Dock Road stands as a proof of his popularity in
Blackwall. His charities indeed were wholesale. He
was a bit of an invalid from birth and thus left a great
deal of the practical side of the business to his brother
Henry, who had been trained both as a shipwright and
a seaman. Thus Dicky Green had more spare time,
and he delighted to wander about Poplar, his favourite
hound. Hector, at his heels and a crowd of ragged street
urchins in his wake. He always wore waistcoats with
very capacious pockets and from one of these pockets he
was wont to distribute sixpences to the old people at the
almshouses, whilst from the other he produced sweets for
the children. In his charities and philanthropic work
he worthily upheld the name of his father George, to
whom Poplar was indebted for Green's Sailors Home,
the Trinity Schools, the Trinity Chapel and the alms-
houses, to mention the chief only of his gifts to the East End.

http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/basil-lubbock/the-blackwall-frigates-bbu/page-8-the-blackwall-frigates-bbu.shtml