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Author Topic: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong  (Read 26122 times)

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood - Old Bailey 1848
« Reply #18 on: Saturday 25 May 13 22:48 BST (UK) »
Researching the Collingwoods that participated at the Old Bailey. Forward/Backward click -1685-1908

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18480515-name-918&div=t18480515-1350#highlight

Reference Number: t18480515-1350
Offence: Theft > simple larceny
Verdict: Guilty > no_subcategory; Guilty > no_subcategory
Punishment: Transportation

15th May 1848
1350. PATRICK BRYAN and JAMES KERR , stealing 12lbs, weight of copper, value 6s.;the goods of Duncan Dunbar; both having been previously convicted.
GEORGE WILSON. I am a constable of the East and West India Docks I was on duty on 14th April, about one o'clock, at the East India Dock basin—I saw prisoners and two other men come out of the import dock, and go out of the gate leading on to the Brunswick Wharf—I saw Bryan and one of the others run out of the gate—I informed some other officers—we all went out into the road, and saw the two prisoners and the other two menbryan looked bulky—I went up to him and said. "Bryan, you have got something about you; you must come inside"—I took him in, and found on him these four parcels of copper, two inside his waistcoat and two inside his trowsers—he said he had found it in the dust-bin—I had seen the prisoners leave the dock in the same directions, with the same two men, once previous to that.
JOHN WHITE. I am a constable of the dock. I was at the export dock gate when Willson stopped Bryan—I stopped Kerr—he said, "You won't want me; you want the other men that have run away"—I said, "I have got you and I shall keep you"—I searched him, and found 4lbs, of copper in the waistband of his trowsers—he said it was given him by a man in a public-house—Bryan said, "It is no use telling a lie about it; we may as well tell the truth."
EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD. I am in the employ of a shipwright I was employed in taking some copper off the ship Earl Grey, belonging to Mr. Duncan Dunbar—I threw the copper on the punt—I can swear to all this copper, except two pieces—it came off that ship—two of these pieces in particular I can swear to, and the other I have no doubt of—they were all in the punt, which was under the ship's acting as a stage for me to work at the vessel—I know this piece by my own marking on it, and this one by its acting as a brace under the pump case.
JAMES GATLOR. I am ship-keeper of the Earl Grey, and live on board I took the copper from the punt into the store, where it was kept—it belonged to Duncan Dunbar—I went to the store on the day after this copper was found, and it was all gone.
Kerr. Q. How long was the copper in the store before you missed it? A. About nine or ten days.
THOMAS PINNER. I was working for Mr. Gladstone—I went to the store shed between ten and eleven o'clock—I found the padlock broken—I told the officer—I found the prisoners in custody the same day.
SAMUKL GLADSTONE. I am superintendent to Mr. Duncan Dunbar. I know this copper—this is a piece we took off the cook's house—I sent this to the store-shed—this other came from the ship Westmeath, and was in the same shed—I saw the shed the day previous, and the lock was quite safe—both the ships belong to Mr. Duncan Dunbar.
Bryan's Defence. I passed by the dock officer; he saw no copper with me.
WILLIAM SOMES. I ama constable of the London Dock. I produce a certificate of Bryan's former conviction, at Clerken well—(read—Convicted Oct., 1847, and confined three months)—he is the person.
THOMAS HOLMES. I am an inspector of police. I produce a certificate of Kerr's former conviction, at this Court—(read—Convicted April, 1840, and transported for seven years)—he is the person.
BRYAN— GUILTY. Aged 28.
KERR— GUILTY. Aged 32.
Transported for Ten Years.

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Old Bailey- Collingwoods
« Reply #19 on: Saturday 25 May 13 22:56 BST (UK) »


Researching the Collingwoods that participated at the Old Bailey. Forward/Backward click -1685-1908

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/search.jsp?foo=bar&form=searchHomePage&_persNames_surname=collingwood&kwparse=and&start=40

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Edward Henry and great uncle George
« Reply #20 on: Tuesday 28 May 13 22:49 BST (UK) »
Highway robbery in Mile End read this account of George Collingwood's involvement. You can forward to all other cases involving the Collingwoods up to 1908, i bet some are related ?

Read full version:
Results - Central Criminal Court

Browse - Central Criminal Court

Offence: Violent Theft > highway robbery: Verdict: Guilty
Punishment: Death
Related Material: Ordinary's Account, 19th December 1733
+ This is not that Jack-the-Hatter who was convicted of several Felonies in September last.
The Prisoners pray'd the Witnesses might be examin'd a-part, which the Court granted.
Samuel Maxwell . On Thursday, November 22, about five in the Evening I went with my Master, Mr. Wilmot, to the Globe at Mile-End; I expected to meet a Man with whom I had some Business to do, but he not coming, I told my Master, I thought there would be no Occasion for me to stay. My Master telling me I might do as I would, I concluded to go, but having received some Money at Stepney, I thought it would not be safe for me to venture over the Fields with it alone, and so I left 26 l. with him, and came away about six a Clock; but recollecting that I still had 7 l. 10 s. in Moidores and Silver, I put it into my Side-pocket for the better Security. Coming into White-horse-lane I was met by three Men, one of them, which I think was Baxter, pass'd me, and bid me good Night, but presently turn'd back again, when one of the others, in a red Coat, with a thick short Stick in his left Hand and a Pistol in his right, bid me deliver, and swore he had seen me put Money in my left Side-pocket; I gave him the Silver, but not the Moidores; then he demanded my Watch, I told him it was a Family-Watch, and I hop'd he would not take it from me. Why then, says he, you may keep it; go forward, and say you are well us'd. So we parted, and I return'd another Way to my Master at the Globe, and told him and Mr. Collingwood, who was with him, what had happen'd. I staid with them there about three or four Hours, and then we all three came away together. We took Links with us, and coming to the same Place where I had been robb'd, we saw two Men running towards us; For God's sake, says one of them, have a Care, Gentlemen, we are frighted out of our Wits; we met a wild Bull, and thought the Devil was coming for us. As they look'd like loose Fellows, Mr. Collingwood ask'd them if there had not been a Robbery there that Night? They said, they had not heard of any. I thought I knew them again, and taking hold of one of them, whose Name is Macdonald, I told him he was the Man that robb'd me. The other was Baxter, and him my Master and Mr. Collingwood took Care of. We carry'd them to the Sun Tavern at Stepney, where we search'd them, and found a large Fowl upon one, and two Chickens upon t'other. We provided them with separate Lodgings for that Night, - the Watch-house and the Round-house. I saw Macdonald next Morning, and then he confess'd that he was the Man who took my Money, and said, as he us'd me well in giving me my Watch again, he hop'd I would let him be an Evidence.
Thomas Wilmot . My Clerk left me and Mr. Collingwood at the Globe between five and six, in order to go home, but in a little Time he return'd again, and told us he had been robb'd; he stay'd with us till about ten, and then we went away together. In the Field we met Baxter and Macdonald running as if they were frighted out of their Wits. They said they had met a mad Bull; we charg'd them with the Robbery, and carry'd them to the Sun at Stepney - Baxter confess'd.
George Collingwood . Going over the Fields with Mr. Wilmot and his Clerk, two Fellows came running along, and crying out, Lord have Mercy upon us! - O Lord! - a mad Bull! - the Devil! - has frighted us out of our Wits. I thought they look'd like a Couple of Rogues, and the Prosecutor said, he believ'd they were the Men that robb'd him, and so we made bold to secure them both.
John Macdonald . I and the two Prisoners went out together upon the Account. We call'd at the Globe, at Mile-End, where we saw the Prosecutor taking some Money out of his Pockets, and so we went out, and watch'd him, and as he came over the Bank,


Baxter. You know what a vile Fellow you have been. You was an Evidence against Stockings, and Wi I have Witnesses to prove I was in another Place when this Robbery was committed.

Elizabeth Johnson . I lodge at Edward Rook's, and I know that the Prisoner, John Rook, was at home all Day on Thursday, the 22nd of November.
The Jury found them Guilty . Death .

Spencer Collingwood (my son)
May 26

to me
George was the brother of a John Collingwood. I'll dig out what I've got in morning. I have Johns will which mentions George and William as sons/brothers. Will check

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Collingwoods at the 'Bailey
« Reply #21 on: Tuesday 28 May 13 22:58 BST (UK) »

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood - Margaret Collingwood
« Reply #22 on: Monday 03 June 13 23:48 BST (UK) »
http://www.rebus.demon.co.uk/datasets/collingw.htm

25 Apr 1698   M    John COLLINGWOOD husb of Mary BARKER   Stepney, St. Dunstan MDX    TPR    G: mariner of Wapping; B: widow

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t17480526-18-person216&div=t17480526-18#highlight
Margarett Collingwood- resided at Queen Anne Alley, which was a small Court leading off Farthing Fields. Highly probable that this is the mother of John (Edward?)the Sawyer, b 1737 and apprenticed (about 1750, 7yrs)

19 Aug 1731   C    John COLLINGWOOD son of John & Margaret St George in the East MDX    TPR    age 3 days, father a mariner of Farth[ing?] Fields [LMA Source Ref: X024/123]


04 Jan 1737   C    John COLLINGWOOD son of John & Margaret.   Stepney, St. Dunstan MDX    TPR    1736/37 age 28 days, father an upholsterer of Rat[cliffe?] [LMA Source Ref: X024/016]
Upholsterers were usually master tradesmen skilled in all aspects of of ship's fittings and were often skilled as shipwrights, ropemakers, sailmakers, etc. These skills were often required before a mariner could manage a ship as 'Master' or Master Mariner.

16 Dec 1757   APPR    John COLLINGWOOD   Woolwich Yard KEN    TNA    Foreman's apprentice to John Puckley of Woolwich yard; duty 9s paid @ 6d on £18/-/- on 24 Dec 1757 [IR 1/21 folio 115]
28 Oct 1764   M    Edward COLLINGWOOD husb of Elizabeth POINTER   Limehouse, St. Anne MDX    PR    G: b [X]; B: s, [X]; botp, by banns; W: Charles Roth, Thomas Outerloney

15 Jan 1773   C    John COLLINGWOOD son of Edward & Elizth.   Stepney, St. Dunstan MDX    PR    age 2 days, father a sawyer of Poplar
01 Aug 1773   B    John COLLINGWOOD   Stepney, St. Dunstan MDX    PR    of Poplar, buried at Ratcliffe? infant aged 9months?
 
17 Jul 1774   C    Elizabeth Mary COLLINGWOOD dau of Edward & Elizabeth   Stepney, St. Dunstan MDX    PR    age 28 days, father a sawyer of Poplar

18 Aug 1776   C    John Edward COLLINGWOOD son of John Edward & Elizth.   Stepney, St. Dunstan MDX    PR    age 13 days, father a sawyer of Poplar
(John Edward the Ropemaker 1776 - 1821 age 45yrs)
 
01 Jul 1804   C    John COLLINGWOOD son of John & Elizabeth   Stepney, St Dunstan MDX        born 1 Jun 1804, father a ropemaker of Poplar
 
01 Oct 1806   C    Mary COLLINGWOOD dau of John & Elizabeth   Stepney, Saint Dunstan MDX    IGI    Batch C055761

05 Mar 1809   C    George Edward COLLINGWOOD son of John & Elizabeth   Stepney, St. Dunstan MDX    PR    born 3 Jan 1809, father a ropemaker of Poplar

12 Feb 1815   C    James William COLLINGWOOD son of John Edward & Elizabeth   Limehouse, St. Anne MDX    PR    born 18 Jan 1815, father a ropemaker of Limehouse

05 Aug 1817   C    EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD son of John Edward & Elizabeth   Limehouse, St. Anne MDX    PR    born 5 Jul 1817, father a ropemaker of Limehouse

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1859/02/007cam.htm

1859: Edward Henry AND son Robert Henry sail on the Camperdown to Austrailia as carpenter and mate

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #24 on: Sunday 16 June 13 17:31 BST (UK) »
Happy Valley cemetary Hong Kong Island

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=93206932

Edward Henry's last voyage was on the Dharwar where he was taken ill and died of 'fever' in Hong Kong Oct 1878. From the dates he was probably taken ill on his journey back from Sydney where the Dharwar had loaded with bales of wool (for balast in the lower belly of the ship having disembarked passengers). Then at Hong Kong for tea which would be stowed mid-decks.

 http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1878/05/032dha.htm


This old account of the Dharwar including a beautiful real picture, from the biography of William Inkster- shipwright who made HIS last sea journey on the Dharwar 1888-89, saving the ship from severe storm damage. These stories are a rare insight into the bravery of the seaman of the sea clippers.

scroll down as you read, to see the Dharwar..a fantastic clipper in full sail...
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Hbdb7hWldBkC&pg=PA11&lpg=PA11&dq=sister+ship+of+the+dharwar&source=bl&ots=GC_VzcQn1J&sig=EV0ozKaiZHsopebPLEe2g9I3neU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=xuO8UZ_iCKil0QWnioGIDw&ved=0CDEQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=sister%20ship%20of%20the%20dharwar&f=false


Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #25 on: Sunday 16 June 13 18:57 BST (UK) »
The Dharwar

1872/73
Sailed from San Francisco to Liverpool in 97 days under Captain T. Freebody.
1880
In command of Captain C.W.H. Hutchins.
1883 February 8 - June 4
Sailed from Sydney to London in 116 days.
1883 July 15 - September 30
Sailed from Plymouth with *414 emmigrants to Sydney in 77 days. Had to be quarantined at arrival
as there was measles and fever on board.

One of the tasks of a shipwright was to overhaul the copper covering of the hull. Copper sheathing often buckled and bent with the battering of the waves causing 'drag'. Since most of these clippers competed for the fastest times on their journeys often this work was done, if safely possible while at sea.

*It is hard to imagine that these sailing ships could carry over 400 passengers, yet they often did unless they were cargo loaded. Outward bound ships carried troops for India and China to protect and relieve serving soldiers for the East India Company. Disembarking their human cargo they then had to load tea or wool even timber as ballast. When troops were not onboard then a monthly consignment of emigrants or convicts were loaded. The Australian 'wool-fleets' began as the tea trade suffered by competition and the US began their tea trade in the 1860's.

The Dharwar was as fast as the Cutty Sark and the Thermopylae having competed on seperate occasions making the Australian trip under different sea conditions.


http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1875/03/013the.htm

http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/earl-grey

Silver Eagle , note over 400 women transporties to Australia?
Convicts or Missionaries or women sailing to re-join their men folk that went before them?

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1872/05/066sil.htm

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #26 on: Sunday 16 June 13 20:34 BST (UK) »
Edward Henry Collingwood worked repairing the Earl Grey-convict ship and gave evidence at the 'Bailey,1848.

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18480515-name-918&div=t18480515-1350#highlight

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=OA17550317n23-2&div=OA17550317#highlight

At the Place of EXECUTION.
ON Monday morning, the 17th instant, about nine o'clock, the several malefactors ordered for execution, were brought out of the press-yard, and being put into three carts, Gill and Delarant , in one; Trevis , Haynes and Burton , in a second; Burk , Preston and Dyson , in a third, were carried to the place of execution, about ten o'clock. When they were tied up to the fatal tree, some time was passed in recommending their souls to divine mercy; and they were very intent to prayers, in the name of Christ and his church, offered up to the throne of grace in their behalf; and prayed as heartily in others, which they repeated for themselves, acknowledging their unworthiness, and dependance only on Christ's merits.
Dyson, at getting into the cart at Newgate, as also when he was in the cart from which he was executed at Tyburn, shewed such extraordinary marks of senselesness of his condition, as surprised every beholder. But where's the wonder, when we consider him as scarce past childhood; having never been exercised, but in puerile amusements; having had no education; and scarce ever having heard there was a God and a future state, till under sentence of death. Notwithstanding, as horrible a dread overwhelmed him, as did, perhaps, any of the rest, who behaved as became people in their last moments.
Only Burk died a Roman catholick ; who declared, as Gill did to the last, that the robbery, for which Isaiah Robbins, now under respite for three weeks, was convicted, was by them committed near Whitechapel- mount , upon Mr. Richardson. Execution was done upon them without any disturbance, tho' a vast multitude were gathered together on the occasion. Their bodies were delivered to their friends.
This is all the Account given by me, JOHN TAYLOR , Ordinary of Newgate.