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Author Topic: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong  (Read 24811 times)

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #27 on: Tuesday 18 June 13 00:20 BST (UK) »
Edward Henry had an Uncle, reputedly a cousin of John the Ropemaker his dad, 1776-1821

ie 'Frankie' Collingwood ?

The man who shot the man, that Killed Lord Nelson at Trafalgar ? We are trying to find out !

Robert Southey in his Life of Nelson (pub 1813) credited both John Pollard and Midshipman Francis Edward Collingwood as being the 'avenger of Nelson'. However in a letter to The Times 13 May 1863, John Pollard wrote

'It is true my old shipmate Collingwood who has now been dead some years came up on the poop for a short time. I had discovered the men crouching in the top of the Redoutable and pointed them out to him, when he took up his musket and fired once; he then left the poop, I conclude, to return to his station on the quarter deck… read more

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&sqi=2&ved=0CC8QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rmg.co.uk%2Fexplore%2Fsea-and-ships%2Ffacts%2Ffaqs%2Fwho-shot-the-man-who-shot-lord-nelson&ei=K32JUdDmHMb40gXHjoGQDQ&usg=AFQjCNF2dDvSkz8dNNbxur2vwoqct4KxpA&sig2=Z0ZZ2Uc1tw0Ph_EmN1r3yQ

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #28 on: Tuesday 18 June 13 00:34 BST (UK) »
Journal of the Pembrokeshire Historical Society  - Vol. 9 2000 Some Pembrokeshire sea officers
           

Two Pembrokeshire midshipmen were in HMS Victory with Lord Nelson.
Of Robert Cutts Barton little is known except that he was born in the
county in 1785 and joined HMS Victory off Toulon on 31 July 1803 from
the frigate HMS Amphion in which he had gone out from Britain. Two
weeks after Trafalgar he transferred to HMS Queen 98, flagship of Admiral
Collingwood. He was promoted lieutenant in 1806 and served in the boats
of the Apollo cutting out a convoy in Rosas Bay in 1809. Barton was made
a commander in 1819 and died aged 42 at Bideford in 1827.102
The other Pembrokeshire midshipman in HMS Victory, Francis Edward
Collingwood, born at Milford on 23 March 1785, is immortalised in Arthur
Devis' famous painting of the death of Nelson. The Admiral's biographer,
Carola Oman,103 records that some midshipmen, walking wounded, were
being treated in the cockpit where Nelson lay dying. In the painting
Collingwood is shown standing in the background with Lieutenant Yule,
'their British bulk and complexions contrasting with those of the Admiral's
wizened, whiskered Neopolitan valet'.104
Collingwood was the son of 'Francis Collingwood of Greenwich Esq. by
Sarah, sister of Captain Thomas Richbell RN, Chief Magistrate of the
Thames Police'.105 His grandfather, Edward Collingwood, had been Master
Attendant at Plymouth, Portsmouth, Chatham and Deptford Dockyards.
After serving in sloops and frigates, and in Foley's old Nile command,
HMS Goliath, Collingwood joined HMS Victory at Spithead on 14 Sep-
tember 1805, the month before Trafalgar. Young Collingwood has long
been reputed to have been the avenger of the death of Nelson by having
shot the French sharpshooter in the rigging of the Redoutable. This dis-
tinction was, however, claimed by a fellow midshipman, John Pollard, then
in retirement at the Royal Naval Hospital, Greenwich, in a letter to The
Times on 13 May 1863 in which he said that Collingwood had been with
him on the poop of the flagship but for a short time only:
It is true my old shipmate, Collingwood, who has now been dead
some years, did come in the poop for a short time. I had discovered
the men crowding in the tops of the Redoutable, and pointed them
out to him, when he took up a musket and fired once; then he left
the poop, I conclude, to return to his station on the quarter deck. I
remained firing until there was not a man to be seen in the top ....cont

http://welshjournals.llgc.org.uk/browse/viewpage/llgc-id:1165908/llgc-id:1166683/llgc-id:1166695/getText

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Collingwoods in Australian Waters
« Reply #30 on: Tuesday 02 July 13 00:58 BST (UK) »
Searching for Edward Henry's eldest son Edward Robert ? Did he emigrate to Oz in the 1870's ? Was his dad on a 'working' visit on the Dharwar to visit his son in 1878 and died on the journey back in Hong Kong? EH's wife Anne Merrit hasd died in 1876, so EH would be free to visit his son

And did Edward Robert's wife travel later to join him....there are some entries within these web sites of 'Mrs Collingwood and infant' ?
And a Mr A.Collingwood with 3 children and wife on the Cuzco-1877.
 My great grand father Alfred Daniel, b. 1846,ER's YOUNGER brother, could have been on this ship. I just don't know but i am sure that if Edward Robert had emigrated it follows that other relatives could follow. I know that my grand father also called Alfred Daniel, b 1879 worked on ships travelling to HK and Oz.

There are literally scores of Collingwoods that travelled from the UK.
This web site shows many of them, however, trying to track our main ancestors is made difficult by not giving in most cases, ages and first names. Though, Edward Robert and Henry are found to be regular on the Melbourne to Sydney runs as well as many that embarked from London in the 1860 - 1900 period.
Ancestors with family origins?
http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/results.htm?cx=004861337844262330206%3Ayq_2tgjydtg&cof=FORID%3A11&q=collingwood&sa=Search&siteurl=mariners.records.nsw.gov.au%2Fsearch.htm&ref=www.GenesReunited.co.uk%2Fboards%2Fboard%2Ftrying_to_find%2Fthread%2F1096458&ss=4974j2747976j11

There are Collingwoods to be found on all of these ships...

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1891/03/069tal.htm

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1862/08/005wws.htm

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1877/11/051cuy.htm

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1897/03/016dov.htm

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1878/05/032dha.htm

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1883/01/076sor.htm

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1880/10/113bar.htm

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1859/02/007cam.htm

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1874/04/063dan.htm


Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Edward Henry Collingwood - Margaret Collingwood
« Reply #32 on: Wednesday 07 August 13 22:48 BST (UK) »
http://www.rebus.demon.co.uk/datasets/collingw.htm

25 Apr 1698   M    John COLLINGWOOD husb of Mary BARKER   Stepney, St. Dunstan MDX    TPR    G: mariner of Wapping; B: widow.
Making the connection, here from John 'the Guinea-man' Master and mariner, is proving difficult. The dates show possibly a missing relative, and i believe John -1698 husband of Mary Barker above married again. He could be John 'the Guinea-man' that married Margaret. Her session at the Old Bailey in 1748 SUGGESTS that at the time she was a lot younger than her husband, while he was 'trading' the African Guinea Coast, probably into his late sixties?

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t17480526-18-person216&div=t17480526-18#highlight


Margarett Collingwood- resided at Queen Anne Crt, which was a small Court leading off Farthing Fields. Highly probable that this is the mother of John (Edward?)the Sawyer, b 1737 and apprenticed (about 1750,aged 13 for 7yrs)

19 Aug 1731   C    John COLLINGWOOD son of John & Margaret St George in ohnthe East MDX    TPR    age 3 days, father a mariner of Farth[ing?] Fields [LMA Source Ref: X024/123].
{ I BELIEVE this infant died, as in 1737, they had another child also called John! }


04 Jan 1737   C    John COLLINGWOOD son of John & Margaret.   Stepney, St. Dunstan MDX    TPR    1736/37 age 28 days, father an upholsterer(?)of Rat[cliffe?] [LMA Source Ref: X024/016]. Apprenticed at Woolwich Yard, 1757 aged 20yrs....this is John 'the sawyer', father of John 'the ropemaker' 1776-1821.

Upholsterers were usually master tradesmen skilled in all aspects of of ship's fittings and were often skilled as shipwrights, ropemakers, sailmakers, etc. *Sawyers were particularly skilled in boat building. These skills were often required before a mariner could manage a ship as 'Master' or Master Mariner.
Margaret's husband was a mariner and Master of a 'Giunea-man, they lived a stone's throw from Tobacco Dock and the old London Dock at Wapping, in Queen Anne Crt, off Farthing Fields!

16 Dec 1757   APPR    John COLLINGWOOD   Woolwich Yard KEN    TNA    Foreman's apprentice to John Puckley of Woolwich yard; duty 9s paid @ 6d on £18/-/- on 24 Dec 1757 [IR 1/21 folio 115]

His son was...
John 'the ropemaker' 1776-1821

Grandson was...
Edward Henry, shipwright, 1817-1878


Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #33 on: Wednesday 23 October 13 23:40 BST (UK) »
EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, 1817 - 1878

135th anniversary of his death in Hong Kong. October 24th 1878.
 Died from fever from exposure while fixing storm damage on Dharwar

http://goo.gl/eI3gTr


William Inkster 10 years later in 1888 was on his last voyage on the Dharwar.
He saved the ship from certain disaster by making good the ships damaged steering gear
in a devasting storm.
He became famous in his day as the shipwright that saved the Dharwar!

When not at sea both William Inkster and Edward Henry Collingwood worked as part time
firemen.
http://goo.gl/OfHRee

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #34 on: Sunday 02 February 14 22:55 GMT (UK) »
http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?action=printpage;topic=158938.0

http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?action=printpage;topic=158938.0

this is a compendum of some of the posts on this thread. I am in the process of researching more of Edward Henry Collingwood, his father John and Grand father. Where they lived and how the family from the mid 18th century (1700's) gradually moved Eastwards from Wapping/West India Docks to Blackwall in  order to be closer to the docks that were currently employing more shipping workers. Also that the Great Housing Projects of the East End beginning in the 1830's to the 1880's and the building of the Poplar Hospital by the East India Company  mainly for the 'injured' dock workers....afforded better housing for those that chose to work in industry closer to the dock vicinities. While those that chose a more criminal or mundane life of 'slumming' the streets, were offered 'help' by volunteering to work in the first great experimental 'Poplar Workhouse Project' at the Northern End of Poplar High St and Dolphin Lane and Dingle Lane, where whole families of 'rough-derelict' Irish Cockneys were living in such dire conditions as "no one wanted to live there". Backing on to Dingle Lane was a narrow access not big enough to draw a cart through called "Tucker's Court Alley".

Adjacent and at rear of Tuckers Court was the 200 yr old open sewer that sloped into the W.I Dock. It is still registered on British History-Online, as 'Rolling Turd Alley'


Here Edward Henry Collingwood spent his EARLY childhood until his father John died of lung disease from the chemicals used in ropemaking, 1821.
Tuckers Court was very close to the West India Docks and the ropemaking yards. Edward was originally apprenticed to Duncan Dunbar in 1829 -30 aged 13yrs and was trained as a sailmaker, carpenter and shipwright. As a protege skilled carpenter, Edward began his training at the start of Britains  longest ever strike...The Great Shipwright's strike of 1832 that lasted 12 yrs until the pay conditions as handed down from 'old pyrates code' of (One 64th of the ships takings) to be shared among the crew. Finally resolved
by the shipping  industry in 1844.
In the meantime shipwrights and sailmakers had to learn other crafts and in some cases they took to being firemen or dock policemen when not able to work in the docks during this awful strike.
more later,,a fascinating story..is unfolding

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #35 on: Sunday 02 February 14 23:23 GMT (UK) »
Margaret Collingwood...Great Grand-Mother of Edward Henry Collingwood, and mother of 'John the Sawyer'. Husband 'John' Collingwood of Wapping, Queen Anne's Crt. "Master Mariner"- Guinea Coast

Margaret Collingwood."Why then, Gentlemen of the Jury, I will tell you. My husband has been gone these six years, trading on the coast of Guinea; and he being gone so long I was forced to take a lodging, and take in plain work, and go out to ironing. As to my sister, she lives in a very creditable manner, I do assure you".



http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t17480526-18-person216&div=t17480526-18#highlight

Margaret Collingwood (Sister of the Prosecutor) sworn .
Q. Do you know the Prisoner?
Collingwood. Yes. About a fortnight before this affair happened, the Prisoner came to my sister's, and enquired after us. I had not seen him for fifteen years, and I said, Mr. Rooke, I thought you had been dead, and we made a little bumbo, and he said he would put us in a way of getting an estate. He asked where I lived, and said he would call upon me; I said it would not be agreeable for him to call where I was, for I was not much at home; and I desired he would call upon my sister.
Q. Do you know any thing of this fact? Did you see your sister in this condition ?
Collingwood . Yes, I did, and I saw her before the Justice , and he said he had drunk a pint of gin that morning.
Prisoner. Was not I searched before the Justice?
Collingwood . Yes, you was. He said he threw himself into the river.
Prisoner . Mrs. Tod fell down, and struck her head against the stairs, and she struck me with the poker; and to shew the malice of this woman , she has raised up two boys to swear , that I threw this money into the Thames. She picked up a solicitor at Hick's Hall, and he said there were four guineas and a half thrown into the Thames by me; said I, do you know this? and he said, I have persons to swear it; and she said she would transport me or hang me. She had no money, for I was to lend her money till I could get a house out of the mortgagee's hands. I had the honour twice to be admitted an attorney , once by Mr . Justice Price, and once by Mr. Justice Denton. This is an artful laid thing. I lodged in her father's and mother's house, and spent a great deal of money there; and once or twice a week she and her sister went through my room when I was asleep, and took my money. There was a quarrel between me and the Prosecutrix, but I had no manner of intention to commit a robbery or any act of violence; for I went to enquire after her youngest sister, Polly, and she said I dare not let you see her, for if she is catched, she will be hanged [for her mother and she were transported.] I cannot say how I hurt her, for I never struck her with the poker; and that poker could not be bent so, if it was taken to any anvil; I have been robbed at their house, from time to time, of two or three guineas a week.
Q. If these persons were of that character, what made you go there?
Eliz. Tod. I was but a child when he lodged at my father's house.
Jury. We should be glad to know what Mrs. Collingwood's husband is?
Collingwood. My husband is master of a Guinea-man .
Jury. Where do you live?
Collingwood. In Queen's-Square, Ratcliff-Highway .
Jury. Why was it improper for him to come to your house?
Collingwood. I thought it improper.
Jury. For what reason.
Collingwood. Why then, Gentlemen of the Jury, I will tell you. My husband has been gone these six years, trading on the coast of Guinea; and he being gone so long I was forced to take a lodging, and take in plain work, and go out to ironing. As to my sister, she lives in a very creditable manner, I do assure you.
Guilty *.
* This offence was made transportation by an Act in the year 1734; whereby it is enacted, that if any person or persons after the first day of May, 1734, shall with any unlawful instrument or weapon assault, or with any menances demand any goods, chattels or money, with a felonious intent, that then, and in that case, every person lawfully convicted of the same, shall be adjudged guilty of felony, and shall be transported for seven years.