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Author Topic: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong  (Read 25954 times)

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #99 on: Wednesday 17 May 17 21:23 BST (UK) »
EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD and WILLIAM INKSTER

  This year is the 200th anniversary of his birth.
 Died from fever from exposure while fixing storm damage on Dharwar 24-Oct 1878

http://goo.gl/eI3gTr

http://goo.gl/OfHRee

WILLIAM INKSTER -shipwright in 1888 was on his last voyage on the Dharwar.
He saved the ship from certain disaster by making good the ships damaged steering gear
in a devasting storm. He became famous in his day as the shipwright that saved the Dharwar!

Ten years earlier in 1878, also shipwright on the Dharwar, Edward Henry Collingwood made good some storm damage to the bowsprit and spinnaker. In cold and heavy weather the Dharwar was just two days out from Old Hong Kong. He contracted a fever and died in a Hong Kong hospital four days later. His crew pals clubbed together to have a headstone erected and he is buried in Hong Kong's Happy Valley cemetary.

Shipwrights often made ships' coffins and it has intrigued me if Edward Henry made one for himself?

When not at sea both William Inkster and Edward Henry Collingwood worked as part time firemen. Then of course the fire service recruited mainly volunteers usually seaman that had time between ships. They had to live close to the fire station and Edward Henry lived at this time only yards away at 28, Masters Lane now called Gillender St that runs South in one direction parallel to the tunnel approach. He had moved from Cawdor St, since demolished in 1952 to make way for the Blackwall tunnel approach- A12. Just a few minutes walk was the entrance to the East India Docks and the now demolished Poplar Docks and Seaman's Hospital. So small and narrow were these streets that dozens of streets along the tunnel approach were demolished in 1951-52. Cawdor St originally continued on from Dee St and Abbott Rd. The old building that housed the fire station in Gillender St and no 28 are still there but renovated and used by offices and a service depot.

http://goo.gl/OfHRee

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #100 on: Saturday 20 May 17 18:35 BST (UK) »
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=46508

Edward Henry's father was John Collingwood, 1776 - 1821
He was only 45yrs and i believe  he died from a lung related illness from his trade as a ropemaker?
John Tucker's whitelead paint yard was almost within the ropeyards . Ropes were tarred for protection against seawater and the mills were within the same 'yards.' Most industry workers died of lung diseases especially those involving tarring and whitelead paintmaking. He lived in Tuckers Court Alley where his son Edward Henry also grew up and worked as a shipwright.

Edward  moved closer to the East India Docks to that he could go to sea from there, working on ships and to escape the perils his dad endured with dangerous chemicals. John had received a pension from the Dunbar Wharf and was retired early due to ill health.  He was held in high esteem by his employers as a master ropemaker having supplied the ropes for Nelson's 'ships-of-the-line fleet at Trafalgar. Nine years after his father's death Edward was apprenticed to Duncan Dunbar as a shipwright in 1830.  He was a young apprentice when the Great Shipwright Strike of 1831-2 and therefore was commissioned to train in other aspects within the shipyards including more strenuous dock and stevedore work until the nearly year-long strike was over.

Edward was 4yrs old when his dad John died in 1821. He moved to No.6 Cawdor St, which was demolished to make way for the entrance  of the Blackwall Tunnel Approach, A12 (part of the old Brunswick Rd), that ran to my father's  last home in St Leonards St' Bow.

 Edward moved from Cawdor St, to Ellerthorpe St, which was cleared in 1951 for the new Lansbury Market project. Ellerthorpe St continued on from Ricardo St,THROUGH TO THE CURRENT market entrance, which was built on top of the demolished Ellerthorpe St. He then moved to Lochnagar St, Poplar and thence to his last known home in Masters Lane (now Gillender St) to be closer to the docks and his work as a part-time fireman.
My Great-grandfather, Alfred Daniel,b 1846 was  born at Tuckers Court Alley.This place was close to the Poplar Workhouse and was also home for some rough 'Irish Cockneys'
My grand father Alfred Daniel, b 1879 was born after 'his' grandfather Edward Henry died in Hong Kong in 1878 the year before he was born.

I am trying to establish the Collingwood connections with historical events; the English Civil War, The High Sheriffs of Northumberland, the pubs around Wapping, and the possibility that some may have sailed on pirate ships including The Adventure Galley of Captain William Kydd

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #101 on: Sunday 21 May 17 21:53 BST (UK) »
from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
View Profile  Personal Message (Online)

Re: EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD,
Reply #58 on: Today at 21:39
QuoteModify
from previous post......timescales

{Edward moved from Cawdor St, to Ellerthorpe St  which was cleared in 1951 for the new Lansbury Market project. Ellerthorpe St continued on from Ricardo St,THROUGH TO THE CURRENT market entrance, which was built on top of the demolished Ellerthorpe St. He then moved to Lochnagar St, Poplar and thence to his last known home in Masters Lane (now Gillender St) to be closer to the docks and his work as a part-time fireman}

Edward relocated from Cawdor St about 1851 ...100 yrs BEFORE the Blackwall Tunnel -A12 approach and the Lansbury Market projects. When Duncan Dunbar died in 1862 the West India Docks were fast making way for the new East India Docks. Edward was now moving closer to the Blackwall projects and by 1859 he was living at Ellerthorpe St before moving to Masters Lane around 1863. His new employers now were 'Dicky' Green and Money Wigram
It is believed that his mother  Anne Merritt and his siblings suffered extreme hardship and near poverty after John died in 1821. However,living in Tuckers Crt Alley was only yards from the POPLAR workhouse where most of the impoverished and widows ended up. It was Poplars first experiment in trying to help the poor. Often whole families with children over 7yrs of age and the work shy,  were given 12 hours work for pittances or just food for the day. Edward and his siblings were given apprentices both at the Dunbar Wharf and The East India Company on the merits and 'tickets-notes' of their deceased father as they in turn reached the ages of 12 -13

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878
« Reply #102 on: Tuesday 23 May 17 20:26 BST (UK) »
My father Alfred Daniel Collingwood embarked N.Y. 4th Oct 1942 and re-boarded the Sourabaya around the 25th Oct 1942. Two days out from New York she was torpedoed. He spent a day in the sea with five other seamen clinging to each other's lifejackets. Was rescued by a U.S. ship and taken back to the U.S. He was subsequently thought 'missing presumed dead'.

http://uboat.net/allies/merchants/ship.html?shipID=2302

At 23.03 hours on 27 Oct 1942, U-436 fired a torpedo at the convoy HX-212 southeast of Cape Farewell, heard a detonation after 59 seconds and observed the hit on the Frontenac. Five minutes later a spread of three torpedoes was fired and detonations were heard after 1 minute, 1 minute 16 seconds and 2 minutes 24 seconds. The third torpedo sank the Sourabaya and the fourth damaged the Gurney E. Newlin, both hits were observed by Seibicke. At 23.11 hours, U-436 fired the stern torpedo and reported another ship damaged, but this is not confirmed by Allied sources.

The master, 36 crew members, 24 passengers, 16 DBS and four gunners from Sourabaya (Master William Thompson Dawson) were picked up by HMCS Alberni (K 103) (Lt I.H. Bell, RCNVR) and HMCS Ville de Quebec (K 242) (LtCdr A.R.E. Coleman, RCNR) and landed at Liverpool on 2 November. 26 crew members, 31 passengers, 16 DBS and four gunners were picked up by the Bic Island, which was torpedoed and sunk with all hands by U-224 (Kosbadt) on 29 October.

The British landing craft HMS LCT-2281 (291 tons) on deck was lost with the vessel.

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #103 on: Friday 30 June 17 00:23 BST (UK) »
Correction from my post Sunday 21st of May. I incorrectly said that Edward Henry Collingwood's mother was Ann Merritt. That was his wife she died 1876. Sorry

His mother was Elizabeth Marshall died 1851

28 Feb 1802   Married    John COLLINGWOOD husb of Elizabeth MARSHALL   Limehouse, St. Anne MDX    PR    G: b; B:, s; botp, by banns, both signed; W: Edward Towns, Thos. Long

(Edward Henry's Parents)

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #104 on: Saturday 22 July 17 20:41 BST (UK) »
The Dharwar sister ship of The Cutty Sark

One of the tasks of a shipwright was to overhaul the copper covering of the hull. Copper sheathing often buckled and bent with the battering of the waves causing 'drag'. Since most of these clippers competed for the fastest times on their journeys often this work was done, if safely possible while at sea.

*It is hard to imagine that these sailing ships could carry over 400 passengers, yet they often did unless they were cargo loaded. Outward bound ships carried troops for India and China to protect and relieve serving soldiers for the East India Company. Disembarking their human cargo they then had to load tea or wool even timber as ballast. When troops were not onboard then a monthly consignment of emigrants or convicts were loaded. The Australian 'wool-fleets' began as the tea trade suffered by competition and the US began their tea trade in the 1860's.

The Dharwar was as fast as the Cutty Sark and the Thermopylae having competed on separate occasions making the Australian trip under different sea conditions.




http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/earl-grey

Silver Eagle , note over 400 women transporties to Australia?
Convicts or Missionaries or women sailing to re-join their men folk that went before them?




Edward Henry Collingwood worked repairing the Earl Grey-convict ship and gave evidence at the 'Bailey,1848.

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18480515-name-918&div=t18480515-1350#highlight

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=OA17550317n23-2&div=OA17550317#highlight

John Taylor - Ordinary's account of typical executions at Newgate Prison

At the Place of EXECUTION.
ON Monday morning, the 17th instant, about nine o'clock, the several malefactors ordered for execution, were brought out of the press-yard, and being put into three carts, Gill and Delarant , in one; Trevis , Haynes and Burton , in a second; Burk , Preston and Dyson , in a third, were carried to the place of execution, about ten o'clock. When they were tied up to the fatal tree, some time was passed in recommending their souls to divine mercy; and they were very intent to prayers, in the name of Christ and his church, offered up to the throne of grace in their behalf; and prayed as heartily in others, which they repeated for themselves, acknowledging their unworthiness, and dependance only on Christ's merits.
Dyson, at getting into the cart at Newgate, as also when he was in the cart from which he was executed at Tyburn, shewed such extraordinary marks of senselesness of his condition, as surprised every beholder. But where's the wonder, when we consider him as scarce past childhood; having never been exercised, but in puerile amusements; having had no education; and scarce ever having heard there was a God and a future state, till under sentence of death. Notwithstanding, as horrible a dread overwhelmed him, as did, perhaps, any of the rest, who behaved as became people in their last moments.
Only Burk died a Roman catholick ; who declared, as Gill did to the last, that the robbery, for which Isaiah Robbins, now under respite for three weeks, was convicted, was by them committed near Whitechapel- mount , upon Mr. Richardson. Execution was done upon them without any disturbance, tho' a vast multitude were gathered together on the occasion. Their bodies were delivered to their friends.
This is all the Account given by me, JOHN TAYLOR , Ordinary of Newgate.


Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Left in The Lurch
« Reply #105 on: Saturday 22 July 17 21:16 BST (UK) »
Ordinary's Account, 17th March 1755.
 
As the prisoners were taken to Tyburn for execution, the cart ( which was called a lurch)was ceremoniously pulled over at a nearby tavern and the crowds that had gathered to witness the hangings offered the cart driver a jug of ale, as was customary. While the crowds jeered at the unfortunate souls, the driver would leave the lurch and join in the celebration leaving the prisoners in deep prayer. Then would solemnly carry on his journey to Tyburn Tree.
'Left in the Lurch'

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #106 on: Saturday 02 December 17 21:49 GMT (UK) »

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #107 on: Friday 22 December 17 13:11 GMT (UK) »
MERRY XMAS  EVERYONE



Daniel