Author Topic: SHIP - WHITBY ABBEY AT GALLIPOLI  (Read 7274 times)

Offline Jaggedblue

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Re: SHIP - WHITBY ABBEY AT GALLIPOLI
« Reply #27 on: Thursday 07 September 17 03:04 BST (UK) »
Looking further into this to try and confirm who had what roles I found the following article which describes a Captain C.S. Townsend as being "beach master 'W' beach'. This is consistent with the story that the commander of battle was on board the 'Whitby Abbey' but I am still sure that the ship was under the command of Captain James Whyte Harris RNR. Of whether there would have been a senior commissioned officer on board, during this battle, I have no idea.  http://www.lynsted-society.co.uk/Projects/WW1/Despatch_1915_07_01_Opening_Gallipoli_April_25_26.html

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Offline MaxD

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Re: SHIP - WHITBY ABBEY AT GALLIPOLI
« Reply #28 on: Thursday 07 September 17 10:14 BST (UK) »
My aim in the post was solely to pick up two loose ends from this very interesting thread.  The post about brigade headquarters didn't seem to have been followed through and the request early on for a map showing the location of the Whitby Abbey had also not been covered although beach W had been defined.  I hope the post answered these two.

The naval despatch is indeed quite clear and Capt Townsend is also clearly named as Beach Master W Beach in the 29th Division Operation Order for the landing.  86 Brigade HQ were temporary passengers (they were not " commanders of the battle") on the Whitby Abbey so it is perhaps unsurprising that the diary confuses the role of Capt Townsend.  (It could be said that "under the command of" was referring to his role as Beach Master).

As to the captain of the vessel, presumably James Whyte Harris is the officer who served from 1898 retired November 1913 and shown in the April 1915 Navy List as a Lieutenant Commander RNR Retired - did he return to active service to command a minesweeper?

MaxD

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Offline iwccc

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Re: SHIP - WHITBY ABBEY AT GALLIPOLI
« Reply #29 on: Saturday 09 September 17 11:58 BST (UK) »
Thank you MaxD,  Very interesting information about the Whitby Abbey.  It will take me a while to go through it all .....but thank you for your input to my questions.

Offline iwccc

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Re: SHIP - WHITBY ABBEY AT GALLIPOLI
« Reply #30 on: Saturday 09 September 17 12:00 BST (UK) »
To Jaggedblue,  Thank you for your interesting information about the Whitby Abbey.  When I get a moment I will try and match up the information with my grandfather's diary.  Very much appreciate you contributing to the post.  Thanks

Offline dlaird

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Re: SHIP - WHITBY ABBEY AT GALLIPOLI
« Reply #31 on: Sunday 17 June 18 10:09 BST (UK) »
I have a letter from Grandfather who was in the 12 Nelson Company Canterbury Regiment NZEF dated 17 May 1915 written on HMS Whitby Abbey letterhead. He was on board being taken to a hospital ship. He was probably being evacuated from the attacks at Cape Helles on 7/8 May where he was shot through the hip. it doesn't seem like it would be a minesweeper. Not much help but interesting.

Offline MaxD

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Re: SHIP - WHITBY ABBEY AT GALLIPOLI
« Reply #32 on: Sunday 17 June 18 10:37 BST (UK) »
Welcome to Rootschat!   HMS Whitby Abbey was used as a supply vessel at Gallipoli
http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishShips-Locations10Attacked.htm (see the entry for HMS Barry also for more detail).


Hopefully he recovered but didn't go back to the horror that was Gallipoli.


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Offline dlaird

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Re: SHIP - WHITBY ABBEY AT GALLIPOLI
« Reply #33 on: Sunday 17 June 18 11:29 BST (UK) »
I just deciphred an attached document on his letter. He was wounded on 16 May and the NZ Brigade was back at ANZAC Cove by then and the Whitby Abbey would therefore be there.
No he didnt go back. The bullet was lodged in his pelvis (I have and Xray of it) and it was not removed until 1933 in Wellington hospital.

Offline MaxD

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Re: SHIP - WHITBY ABBEY AT GALLIPOLI
« Reply #34 on: Sunday 17 June 18 11:35 BST (UK) »
Having just read the splendid book - Gallipoli - The New Zealand Story by Christopher Pugsley I can't help thinking that a bullet in the pelvis was preferable to going back!

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Offline dlaird

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Re: SHIP - WHITBY ABBEY AT GALLIPOLI
« Reply #35 on: Sunday 17 June 18 11:57 BST (UK) »
Great book. I was refering to that just today. Interesting how many did have to go back. if I recall from that book about 14500 New Zealanders landed at Gallipoi yet there wer eon about 8200 who served there. Given there was no RR the numbers were those wounded who recovered and went back in. If you are really interested in that campaign the best book I read is "No Better Death" by John Crawford. It is based on the letters and diaries of Lt Colonel William Malone. A wonderful insightful account which unfortunatley only goes until Malone's death on Chunuk Bair on 9 August.