Author Topic: Harwar law stationers  (Read 1531 times)

Offline wren

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Harwar law stationers
« on: Tuesday 23 July 13 11:36 BST (UK) »
Hi All
I have asked about the details of this Harwar family before, they were law writers/ stationers and resided in the Chancery Lane, Lincoln's Inn Serle's place area of London. However, this is a more general question about the nature of their work. I have been reading articles and advertisements for this family in the newspaper archives and they appear to have been brokering for employment and for property. Am I right in concluding that law stationers didn't just sell stationary to lawyers but that they also acted as employment and property brokers and therefore had some training in the processes of the law?

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Offline Timasina

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Re: Harwar law stationers
« Reply #1 on: Tuesday 23 July 13 16:48 BST (UK) »
In the National Archives Podcast 'Behind the scenes: Two centuries of census-taking" Audrey Collins mentions that Law Stationers provided temporary Clerks for the early censuses.

Chris

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Offline wren

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Re: Harwar law stationers
« Reply #2 on: Tuesday 23 July 13 22:11 BST (UK) »
Hi Chris
Its looking to me like they weren't just paper merchants but were multi skilled professionals almost.
I'm just drawing assumptions really from the advertisements that I have read.
Thanks
Wren

Offline lincsmaster

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Re: Harwar law stationers
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 07 August 14 09:06 BST (UK) »
Just came across your post - don't know a great deal about their work, but I believe they used to copy legal documents, therefore employed a team of skilled writer/copiers. No photocopiers in those days therefore the need to produce hard copies of legal documents that were identical. Do you know anything about the Harwar family origins before Henry Harwar (born 1798)?
Richard

Offline wren

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Re: Harwar law stationers
« Reply #4 on: Thursday 07 August 14 10:11 BST (UK) »
Hi Richard
No, I know very little before 1798 only that Henry Harwar was born c 1798 to Henry Harwar and Anne Braddock who had been married at Southwark in 1797. Henry junior had three siblings. I need to do further research in this area. I have lots of unanswered questions regarding this intriguing family.
Wren

Offline lincsmaster

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Re: Harwar law stationers
« Reply #5 on: Thursday 07 August 14 19:40 BST (UK) »
Thanks Wren,
I've just been doing work for a friend who is descended from Joseph Richard, a son of Henry junior. Could be a long standing London family, the surname itself is very unusual and as yet I don't know its root. I'll let you know if I find out anything more.

Best wishes

Richard

Offline Sharonie2

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Re: Harwar law stationers
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 06 March 18 16:41 GMT (UK) »
I have an ancestor, Thomas Harwar born 1716 in Cheshire who was a lawyer. His Son, Richard was also an Attorney At Law. Richard's son, John was born in Congleton, Cheshire and was a clark to a law stationer in the 1851 Census living in 11 Hemlock Court, St Clement Danes, Westminster. Could be a connection as it is an unusual name and not a common occupation.

Offline lincsmaster

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Re: Harwar law stationers
« Reply #7 on: Tuesday 06 March 18 19:54 GMT (UK) »
Almost certainly there is a connection, with this (as you said) unusual name. When I posted my original contribution to the discussion. I was doing it as a favour for someone else who sadly is now unable to continue with their research.
I wish you every success in your journey through the generations. I will try and pick up the threads again just in case I can see an immediate link, but I can't promise anything.
Best wishes.
Lincsamaster

Offline lincsmaster

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Re: Harwar law stationers
« Reply #8 on: Tuesday 06 March 18 23:24 GMT (UK) »
Have just noticed on the 1841 census entry in London for my Henry Harwar, Susannah his wife, and children; below them in the same household are John Harwar, 30 years of age, and (new wife?) Eliza, 20 years of age. Born outside London. Although the spelling of John is suspect, the ages fit and I think they are yours. Presence in Henry's household suggests kinship. Newly-weds yet to move into a place of their own?  What do you think?