Author Topic: David Brunton, Yarrowford, died 1824, I've found his father.  (Read 3948 times)

Offline 1716

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David Brunton, Yarrowford, died 1824, I've found his father.
« on: Tuesday 22 October 13 20:09 BST (UK) »
After 2 years trying to suss this one out I have finally found the answer.

No birth certificate exists for David, or his known sister Joan. (Joan married William Tait in 1811. Both were from Yarrowford). We know Joan was the sister of David through the 1851 census record for her husband, who was living with David Bruntons child (William) and Williams wife, Janet Inglis. William is described as "nephew"

So we are left with no parents for David Brunton, who died in 1824 and no birth certificates for David or Joan.

Now, in 1782 the Bruntons were involved in a dispute with the Incorporation of Taylors in Selkirk. Three of the Yarrowford Bruntons were working for a man called John Inglis in Selkirk. The Incorporation tried to prevent the Bruntons from working anywhere in Selkirk, so they effectively couldn't do business. The Bruntons seem to have basically "left the town" of Selkirk and went back to Yarrowford.

Now, I have obtained a document from 26 April 1782 which included the names of the Bruntons as

"David Brunton Senior, James Brunton and David Brunton Junior"

Looking at the known children of David Brunton senior he had Agnes, Alexander, James and Janet. Last birth being 1760. (I can find no positive history for Alexander - all I have is a birth certificate)

James was baptised in Yarrow (whilst residing in Hangingshaw Mains) on 31 January 1758. He went on to marry Christian Boyd and moved from Yarrow, to Kirkhope around 1790 then Barony in what is now Strathclyde. He was a taylor by trade.

William Tait, the husband of Joan Brunton, was

Cautioner at Agnes Bruntons eldest sons (Adam) wedding. (1815)
Cautioner at Agnes Bruntons eldest daughters (Margaret) wedding. (1814)

David Brunton Junior was witness at Adams eldest sons baptism (1816)

There are no other taylors called David Brunton in the town of Yarrowford at this time. David Brunton Senior died in 1786.

Looking at the 1811 militia records only one David Brunton appears in Yarrow.

David Brunton had another court case in 1790 in Selkirk, suing Christian Lillico for non-payment. So it would seem he was working in Selkirk again.

We have a court record stating that David Bruntons father was David Brunton. We, as yet, have no mothers name. David Brunton seniors father was Alexander Brunton, who married Janet Bell, in Traquair, on the 14 June 1716. Alexander had 6 children in total that I can find.

Now, things I need to do...

Find out why the taylors tried to ban us from Selkirk - I am trying to find the incorporation of taylors minutes which I beleive are still in Selkirk. - correction, the period I am after isn't in the hands of the museum services.

Find the other papers relating to the 1782 case - I know at least 12 more pages exist. I also know that George Rodger has a collection of letters for the period kicking around in Hawick.

Find out if Joan Brunton was actually a mistype for Jean Brunton, who was born in Dumfries in 1777 to a taylor named David Brunton. (Dumfries was on a direct road to Yarrow). There is a possibility that David was a journeyman tailor in Dumfries then went to work for John Inglis in Selkirk. i need to prove/disprove that one.

If you want the documents behind all this then PM me.

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Offline 1716

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Re: David Brunton, Yarrowford, died 1824, I've found his father.
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 26 October 13 11:22 BST (UK) »
Why is this important, David Brunton was the father of James Brunton, grandfather of David William Brunton, one of the prominant engineers in the late 19th/early 20th century in america.

Hes also my direct line, and it was bugging me who his father was.

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