Author Topic: Help required tracing Robert Forrest in 1851 or 1861 census or elsewhere.  (Read 3168 times)

Offline jennywren001

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,080
  • Me with yet another pudding bowl haircut...
    • View Profile
Re: Help required tracing Robert Forrest in 1851 or 1861 census or elsewhere.
« Reply #9 on: Friday 16 January 15 13:04 GMT (UK) »
Hi Dave,
Sorry, but Robert has alluded me totally...just some thoughts given the occupations listed for him...could he have being working away on the railway or working nights in a factory? In and out of jail? Couldn't see him on any merchant navy records but could he have been out commissioning ships? Maybe there's a link (unknown to me) with that time of the year? I've got folks with one occupation listed on their marriage certificates but you find them out ploughing at census time. When he got married was he in the parish you expected to find him? That marriage - just escaped statutory regs wonder if there was a reason for that? Any chance he was using his mother's maiden name? Dad was from Campsie in Stirlingshire have you rooted around there?  A couple of Robert's sons become butchers this struck me as a bit odd but not sure why..sorry this sounds more like a stream of consciousness rather than anything thought through.

If you're anything like me you don't like the gaps as they invariably hold significance!
Good luck
Jen
North East Scotland above the Tay...
JOLLY, Johnston,Thom, Rae, Davidson, Fielding, Sherret
FEARN, McKenzie, Stirling [brick wall], Robb, Wilson, Stott
RUSSELL, Fullerton, Christie, Cochrane, Davidson, Coutts, Easton, Scott
FRASER, Henderson, Noble, Mundie, Goodall, Thain, Neish, Moir

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline daval57

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,918
  • Christmas 2011. My daughter Clare with me.
    • View Profile
    • FORREST surname in Scotland (Facebook group)
Re: Help required tracing Robert Forrest in 1851 or 1861 census or elsewhere.
« Reply #10 on: Friday 16 January 15 14:12 GMT (UK) »
All valid guesses Jen, each as good as the other.
Very unlikely he would use mother's name but in any case I'd checked that previously.
Also checked Campsie records....in fact, I have most records for all Forrests in Stirlingshire born or married prior to 1855... a bit of a one name study.
I'm not too surprised by the butcher connection.  As well as millers, millwrights / engineers in the family, there is a tradition of fleshers / butchers too... through the family and down to my grandfather and a couple of my uncles who owned their own butchers shops in Glasgow.
My dad trained and worked as a butcher before changing career.
I even did a short stint myself.

I think I need to let this go.  Maybe something will turn up out of the blue one day.

Thanks for looking and considering it.

Dave


Added.... Grandad in the middle, under the F in Forrest (no, I'm not cursing!  ;) )
-------------------
FORREST (Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Stirlingshire and Dunbartonshire)
ROONEY (Co Down, Co Antrim) 
BORTHWICK, FORTUNE, BARKER (Lothians)
ANDERSON (Moray, Caithness)

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline AnneRH

  • RootsChat Pioneer
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Help required tracing Robert Forrest in 1851 or 1861 census or elsewhere.
« Reply #11 on: Thursday 01 February 18 18:06 GMT (UK) »
Hi Dave,
It isn't as good as a census, but the attached 1862 report of a fatal accident at "Carluke Grain and Flour Mill, belonging to Mr Robert Forrest" is some evidence that he was in Carluke in 1862 (if it is the right Robert Forrest).  The High Mill was owned and operated by William Dick at the time, so I assume that this story refers to the Low Mill (watermill).

Hope it helps,
Anne