Author Topic: Pronouncing Welsh Gaelic  (Read 7167 times)

Offline Hackstaple

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Re: Pronouncing Welsh Gaelic
« Reply #18 on: Sunday 16 August 15 16:20 BST (UK) »
I learnt Welsh before I ever heard a  word of French so it was easy for me to see similar words - like mor, mer =sea and ffenstr, a window. Pont which is a bridge in both languages probably comes from the Romans though.
Southern or Southan [Hereford , Monmouthshire & Glos], Jenkins, Meredith and Morgan [Monmouthshire and Glos.], Murrill, Damary, Damry, Ray, Lawrence [all Middx. & London], Nethway from Kenn or Yatton. Also Riley and Lyons in South Africa and Riley from St. Helena.
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Offline ScouseBoy

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Re: Pronouncing Welsh Gaelic
« Reply #19 on: Sunday 16 August 15 17:40 BST (UK) »
If you listen to the Australian "soaps"    such as Neighbours  and others  you will hear them use the word "dunny"       Well, I think  that could derive from the Welsh word for toilet.

Who agrees with me?

Secondly,   the Welsh word "tara"        could well  have turned   into   Tarra   for goodbye as used in Liverpool.
Nursall   ~    Buckinghamshire
Avies ~   Norwich

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Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: Pronouncing Welsh Gaelic
« Reply #20 on: Sunday 16 August 15 17:48 BST (UK) »
If you listen to the Australian "soaps"    such as Neighbours  and others  you will hear them use the word "dunny"       Well, I think  that could derive from the Welsh word for toilet.

No, especially as the word you are probably thinking of - "Dynion", means men, not toilet.

Dunny is short for an older word, dunnakin. No-one seems to know where that comes from.

Unless Trystan corrects me, I don't think there is a Welsh word "tara."   
Ta-ra is just a version of ta-ta, which first appeared around 1830/1840, apparently of unknown origin.
Como le dijo el mosquito a la rana, "Mas vale morir en el vino que vivir en el agua"

Offline Elwyn Soutter

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Re: Pronouncing Welsh Gaelic
« Reply #21 on: Sunday 16 August 15 18:00 BST (UK) »


Unless Trystan corrects me, I don't think there is a Welsh word "tara."

My mother is a native Welsh speaker from North Wales. She and her mother said “Tara now” all the time, when saying goodbye at the end of a conversation in Welsh. They both assumed that it had been imported from English (along with numerous other phrases) rather than the other way round. My mother’s Welsh dictionary gives ”yn iach!” as goodbye but she says she never ever used that.
Elwyn

Offline IMBER

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Re: Pronouncing Welsh Gaelic
« Reply #22 on: Sunday 16 August 15 18:02 BST (UK) »
Skewis (Wales and Scotland), Ayers (Maidenhead, Berkshire), Hildreth (Berkshire)

Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: Pronouncing Welsh Gaelic
« Reply #23 on: Sunday 16 August 15 18:06 BST (UK) »

 They both assumed that it had been imported from English (along with numerous other phrases)

I'm sure that's right.
Como le dijo el mosquito a la rana, "Mas vale morir en el vino que vivir en el agua"

Offline Drosybont

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Re: Pronouncing Welsh Gaelic
« Reply #24 on: Sunday 16 August 15 18:08 BST (UK) »
Growing up in North Wales I remember people saying "Tara rwan", translates as "Bye now".

Drosybont
Hotham, Guilliatt, Brown, Winter, Buck, Webster, Mortimore
Richards, Meredith, Gower, Davies, Todd, Westmacott, Hill
Mid C19 Cardiff and Haverfordwest, the Marychurch family.

Offline ScouseBoy

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Re: Pronouncing Welsh Gaelic
« Reply #25 on: Sunday 16 August 15 18:40 BST (UK) »
If you listen to the Australian "soaps"    such as Neighbours  and others  you will hear them use the word "dunny"       Well, I think  that could derive from the Welsh word for toilet.

No, especially as the word you are probably thinking of - "Dynion", means men, not toilet.

Dunny is short for an older word, dunnakin. No-one seems to know where that comes from.

Unless Trystan corrects me, I don't think there is a Welsh word "tara."   
Ta-ra is just a version of ta-ta, which first appeared around 1830/1840, apparently of unknown origin.
   Dynion is pronounced     as dunny.     There fore   it is  95%    probable   that      the Welsh word  Dynion   as passed into the Australian language..   Just as many Indian and Arabic words    have been imported to the UK.   Dynion is on the door of Gentlemens Toilets in WALES.
Nursall   ~    Buckinghamshire
Avies ~   Norwich

Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: Pronouncing Welsh Gaelic
« Reply #26 on: Sunday 16 August 15 18:53 BST (UK) »
Go and find a dictionary that gives dynion as the source for dunny. At 95% probability, it shouldn't take you long.
Como le dijo el mosquito a la rana, "Mas vale morir en el vino que vivir en el agua"