Author Topic: Convict records for those transported to Australia  (Read 5384 times)

Offline Redroger

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Re: Convict records for those transported to Australia
« Reply #36 on: Friday 20 November 15 11:33 GMT (UK) »
I think it unlikely that any offender, specially from the so called "lower classes" would be bailed. Remember that Taylor is the 4th commonest surname in the English speaking world, which doesn't help researchers.
Ayres Brignell Cornwell Harvey Shipp  Stimpson Stubbings (all Cambs) Baumber Baxter Burton Ethards Proctor Stanton (all Lincs) Luffman (all counties)

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Offline Westy11

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Re: Convict records for those transported to Australia
« Reply #37 on: Friday 20 November 15 14:24 GMT (UK) »
LoL :D

Wouldn't it be a painful Family Tree if you had ever one of the common names [Western that is].  Full of Brown's, Smith's, Taylor's & ??? and no one else.

Westy

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Offline dobfarm

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Re: Convict records for those transported to Australia
« Reply #38 on: Friday 20 November 15 18:15 GMT (UK) »
 Unless the deceased was under 21- parents were not mentioned on a death certificate- true !

- but the actual James Taylor's (Convict 1839 ) known church marriage register/certificate of James in Australia may name at least one parent (father)
Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Any transcription of information does not identify or prove anything.
Intended as a Guide only in ancestry research.-It is up to the reader as to any Judgment of assessments of information given! to check from original sources.

In my opinion the marriage residence is not always the place of birth. Never forget Workhouse and overseers accounts records of birth

Offline dobfarm

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Re: Convict records for those transported to Australia
« Reply #39 on: Friday 20 November 15 18:22 GMT (UK) »
Hoping for some assistance as I have reached a brick wall.

My 2 x great grandfather was charged on 5 February 1839 at the County General Sessions Salford  Manchester and subsequently convicted on 25 Feb 1839 at the Salford Intermediate Sessions Salford, Lancaster resulting in transportation to Australia for 10 years.

I have the records of his conviction and transportation and those records relevant to his life in Australia.  However at the time of his transportation he was a married man with 2 children, a boy and a girl. 

As far as I can see his family did not get passage with him. He married for the 2nd time after he had served his 10 years, and I imagine bigamously.

He had a very common name, James Taylor.  I have no idea where he was from at the time of his arrest and so I am hoping there are records that sit behind the records I hold that just maybe give more information about him. 

I have an Ancestry subscription and have accessed the records I hold from there but wonder if there may have been other records and if so where I might find them?

I suppose as this is a brick wall I simply don't know where else to go now to locate his life in England before he was transported to Australia.

Any suggestions welcomed.

Westy

Church marriage in red above
Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Any transcription of information does not identify or prove anything.
Intended as a Guide only in ancestry research.-It is up to the reader as to any Judgment of assessments of information given! to check from original sources.

In my opinion the marriage residence is not always the place of birth. Never forget Workhouse and overseers accounts records of birth

Offline Redroger

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Re: Convict records for those transported to Australia
« Reply #40 on: Saturday 21 November 15 15:44 GMT (UK) »
LoL :D

Wouldn't it be a painful Family Tree if you had ever one of the common names [Western that is].  Full of Brown's, Smith's, Taylor's & ??? and no one else.

Westy

You would imagine that Luffman with 2000 living bearers of the surname across the English speaking world would be pretty easy. That's what I thought until I found 57 John Luffmans!!

A lovely biblical name Hephzibah sounds easy too until I found a similar number in my mother's tree.
My wife's tree includes the names Smith and Taylor, Smith married out and then in again from a different line.
Ayres Brignell Cornwell Harvey Shipp  Stimpson Stubbings (all Cambs) Baumber Baxter Burton Ethards Proctor Stanton (all Lincs) Luffman (all counties)

Offline Westy11

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Re: Convict records for those transported to Australia
« Reply #41 on: Sunday 22 November 15 00:04 GMT (UK) »
Had a bit of a chuckle over that one and yes how incredibly painful and not to be researched and incorporated into ones tree when tired.

Westy

Offline Westy11

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Re: Convict records for those transported to Australia
« Reply #42 on: Sunday 14 January 18 11:13 GMT (UK) »
Strong possible marriage-Try and find this Jane Taylor on 1841 census

James Taylor - Baker, Bachelor,  ofthis Parish m  Jane Dobson - Spinster, this Parish
11 Jul 1836 St Mary, Manchester, Lancashire
Witness: Lawrence Dobson- Thomas Clarke, Clerk
 (Marriages 1833 - 1837, Page 250, Entry 749)

Still searching for James TAYLOR.

Your thoughts. 

The above marriage to Jane DOBSON isn't likely to be my James. 

When James was transported he was reported as being able to Read but not write. 

On a marriage for one of his daughters he signed as a witness with a cross supporting his lack of ability to write. 

On the marriage of James TAYLOR & Jane DOBSON both parties signed their names.

Westy

Offline Westy11

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Re: Convict records for those transported to Australia
« Reply #43 on: Sunday 14 January 18 11:35 GMT (UK) »
I've found another James Taylor occupation Baker his wife Mary Ann from Liverpool Lancashire in a baptism
 Flora McDonald Taylor daughter of of James & Mary Ann Taylor, baker of Key Street
bapt: 17 Apr 1836 St Peter, Liverpool, Lancashire
Baptisms 1835 - 1836, Page 380, Entry 3034


Looked for Flora in the 1841 census without success.  This could be the reason; from FreeBMD:

Deaths Sep 1839, Taylor Flora, Manchester District, Volume 20, Page 538.

(Speculation)  I'm wondering if Mary Ann Taylor (marriage date & maiden name unknown) died in child birth 1836 and then James remarried to Jane Dobson St Mary's Manchester

http://www.ukbmdsearch.org.uk/

 TAYLOR Flora 1839  Market Street Manchester , registers held at Manchester Central
Library Archives

Market st  (Manchester) is continued from St Mary's gate  (road/street) off Brackfriers bridge next river bridge down from New Bailey bridge (Deansgate)


There was a series of burglary's around Dec 1838 and Jan 1839  in Aston under Lyne, Oldham and Manchester area by 3 thieves, a James Taylor being one of them. Again speculation, but could James Taylor have been bailed on the Rochdale theft in June 1838  and this Aston under Lyne James Taylor was the same person. The Aston under Lyne burglar James Taylor was put down as a roamer saying his wife and children were staving, was the reason for him turning to thieving being his first offence.

James was arrested 9 Jun 1838 for burglary and seems to have remained incarcerated.  On 5 Feb 1839 at the County General Sessions Salford charged with  "Larceny from the person".

On the 28 Mar 1839 James was transferred to the Prison Hulk Justitia.

On the 04 May 1839 James was transferred from the Prison Hulk Justitia to the Parkfield.  On the 13 May 1839 Parkfield left Sheerness for New South Wales and arrived 1 Sept 1839.

The records indicate he could read but not write, was married with two children a boy and a girl and had been a soldier and baker.