Author Topic: Nicknames  (Read 3225 times)

Offline Rena

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Re: Nicknames
« Reply #18 on: Sunday 12 November 17 12:21 GMT (UK) »
We're in the North of England, and never ever heard of "Wag" for Charles!

I've just come across this thread and must say I've never heard of "wag" for Charles.

I used to hear the word wag used to describe a witty humorous man.
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Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: Nicknames
« Reply #19 on: Sunday 12 November 17 16:16 GMT (UK) »
Again, Northern England here and never heard of Wag for Charles.

An unusual nickname from my part of Yorkshire that I've never heard since was "Tiffer" for Christopher. There were several Tiffers at my school.
Como le dijo el mosquito a la rana, "Mas vale morir en el vino que vivir en el agua"

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Offline BumbleB

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Re: Nicknames
« Reply #20 on: Sunday 12 November 17 17:07 GMT (UK) »
I can well understand "Tiffer" but I, too, have never come across Wag for "Charles" - born and raised in Cheshire from WRY heritage.

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Offline andrewalston

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Re: Nicknames
« Reply #21 on: Monday 13 November 17 16:28 GMT (UK) »
There are several standard nicknames. Anyone called Miller joining the army would automatically become "Dusty", and anyone called "White" would be "Chalky".

Not come across Wag, personally (I'm in Lancashire, but have worked all over the place).

My mum worked for years at ROF Chorley, where nicknames were commonplace and usually supplanted both given name and surname. There were people whose nicknames had been used so long that their real names were known only to the payroll department. "Spongecake" reputedly always had some cake at lunchtime. "Black Pudding" acquired his name when he used the water urn used for tea making to heat up his lunch. "The Sherriff" was a supervisor whose explanation when he left the office was "I'm just shooting off to ...". Her own nickname, never used to her face, was "The Duchess of Buckshaw", after the office where she was the only female.
Looking at ALSTON in south Ribble area, ALSTEAD and DONBAVAND/DUNBABIN etc. everywhere, HOWCROFT and MARSH in Bolton and Westhoughton, PICKERING in the Whitehaven area.

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