Author Topic: 293 Canongate, Edinburgh and Cranston Street  (Read 4391 times)

Offline Rosinish

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Re: 293 Canongate, Edinburgh and Cranston Street
« Reply #27 on: Saturday 22 October 16 02:07 BST (UK) »
Ruskie,

That sounds feasible...I'd never actually given it a thought until now.

I lived in "Closes" on Streets in my childhood days but the term now just comes under "Flats"

Annie
South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie, MacDonald, MacInnes, MacIntyre, MacKinnon, Steele, Walker

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, MacKinnon, MacPhee

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Offline Rosinish

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Re: 293 Canongate, Edinburgh and Cranston Street
« Reply #28 on: Saturday 22 October 16 02:27 BST (UK) »
From a "Go ogle" search;

http://www.rootschat.com/links/01iq2/

Annie
South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie, MacDonald, MacInnes, MacIntyre, MacKinnon, Steele, Walker

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, MacKinnon, MacPhee

"OLD GENEALOGISTS NEVER DIE - THEY JUST LOSE THEIR CENSUS"

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Offline Ruskie

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Re: 293 Canongate, Edinburgh and Cranston Street
« Reply #29 on: Saturday 22 October 16 08:01 BST (UK) »
Good old Wiki - the obvious first port of call (which I didn't think to check)  ::)
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_closes_on_the_Royal_Mile

Online Forfarian

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Re: 293 Canongate, Edinburgh and Cranston Street
« Reply #30 on: Saturday 22 October 16 08:22 BST (UK) »
We're getting into the realms of mediaeval town planning!

The typical mediaeval European town had a main street, often widening in the middle to accommodate church and/or market place. Houses along the street usually had a narrow strip of land extending away from the street at right angles towards the open land outside the town. Often, these strips of land were separated by lanes that gave access between street and open land.

Over time, more houses were built on the strips of land behind the main street, so you got a close extending parallel to the lanes, with houses along them in a line at right angles to the street. It was common for this 'close' to be known by the name of the owner, tenant or occupier of the original strip of land.

Also, in many cases, the town was surrounded by a defensive wall for protection.

The examples that spring to mind include Edinburgh, Montrose, Elgin and Forres in Scotland, Landshut in Bavaria, and Košice and Levoca in Slovakia, but there are thousands of them all over Europe, and if you look carefully at many modern cities you can still see the evidence of the mediaeval layout in spite of developments and redevelopments and intrusion of motor vehicles.

Here http://maps.nls.uk/view/74400028 is a plan of Elgin, which illustrates the classic layout rather well. It also, as a bonus, names the owners of each close.

And http://maps.nls.uk/view/102190471 is a similar plan of Edinburgh, but also shows the sharp contrast between the Old Town and the late 18th century New Town. I like http://maps.nls.uk/view/74414281 for its little drawings of the houses, and for the illustrations of the layouts of the gardens. It also shows that while all the strips of land in Edinburgh itself were pretty much built over, the ones in the Canongate (to the right of the main crossroads) were only just beginning to be filled in. (The NLS web site suggests that this dates from about 1814, but the complete absence of the New Town suggests to me that it has to be earlier.)
Researching

AITKENHEAD, Lanarkshire; BINNY, Forfar; BLACK, New Monkland; BRYSON, Cumbernauld; BURGESS, North-East Scotland; CRUICKSHANK, Rothes; DALLAS, Botriphnie; DAVIDSON, Oyne; GUTHRIE, Angus; HOGG, Larbert; LESLIE, Rothes/Mortlach; MENDUM, England; MOLLISON, Lethnot; PATERSON, Larbert; RHIND, Forfar; SANG, Scotland; SCOTT, East Kilbride; STOR(R)I/E/Y, Shotts; THORNTON, Shotts; WADDELL, New Monkland; WILKIE, New Monkland; WILKIE, Tannadice; WYLLIE, Angus; YOUNG, Keith

Offline MansfieldTerrier

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Re: 293 Canongate, Edinburgh and Cranston Street
« Reply #31 on: Saturday 22 October 16 08:30 BST (UK) »
Wow!
What a thread this has become. I'm so pleased that it has thrown up various issues, not least the fact that church marriages up to the late C19th were uncommon. Every day's STILL a learning day, eh?
So many thoughts and ideas in relation to the actual location of 293 and theories as to why or how it would be down Mid Common Close!
I'd like to thank everyone for their help and contributions - I've learned an awful lot about this and town planning in general.

And, to cap it all, I currently live on a Close ...

Cheers to all!
MT ;)
Researching ...
PASHBY in Scarborough, Levisham, and outlying area
SEDMAN in Scarborough, Scalby, Everley and Hackness
BIRD in Easington, Patrington, Sculcoates and Hull
DOBSON in Edinburgh, Wakefield, York and Scarborough
SUTTON in Wintringham and Scarborough
ROSS in Edinburgh and outlying districts

Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Ruskie

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Re: 293 Canongate, Edinburgh and Cranston Street
« Reply #32 on: Saturday 22 October 16 09:43 BST (UK) »
Fascinating stuff Forfarian.  :)

I agree that the map with the houses and gardens is excellent! I could spend hours pouring over it.

Offline Millmoor

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Re: 293 Canongate, Edinburgh and Cranston Street
« Reply #33 on: Saturday 22 October 16 10:53 BST (UK) »
Like you Ruskie I could spend hours with these maps. The "bird's eye view" of Edinburgh is particularly good at capturing the layout and crowded nature of the Old Town.( I am Edinburgh born and bred and have walked a lot of these streets many times but have learned a lot from it  already!). Courtesy of Mr Google I think it dates from 1710 (or indeed earlier). Sir George Lockhart who is referred to in the bottom left hand  corner was MP for Edinburghshire 1707- 1708 and was involved in the Act of Union.

The article I located states that it is a smaller copy  of James Gordon of Rothiemay's 1647 plan of Edinburgh...the original map was engraved by Frederick de Wit, whose name appears in the title. A reduced version was engraved by Andrew Johnson around 1710. Perhaps the date 1814 in the catalogue means that it is a copy of the 1710 engraving.

William
Dent (Haltwhistle and Sacriston), Bell and Jetson (Haltwhistle), Postle, Ward, Longstaff, Purvis, Manners, Parnaby and Hardy (Co. Durham), Kennedy and McRobert (Banffshire), Reid(Bathgate), Watson (Wemyss), Graham (Libberton), Sandilands (Carmichael), Munro (Dingwall)

Online Forfarian

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Re: 293 Canongate, Edinburgh and Cranston Street
« Reply #34 on: Saturday 22 October 16 11:02 BST (UK) »
You are quite right, William.

See http://maps.nls.uk/towns/rec/1026
Researching

AITKENHEAD, Lanarkshire; BINNY, Forfar; BLACK, New Monkland; BRYSON, Cumbernauld; BURGESS, North-East Scotland; CRUICKSHANK, Rothes; DALLAS, Botriphnie; DAVIDSON, Oyne; GUTHRIE, Angus; HOGG, Larbert; LESLIE, Rothes/Mortlach; MENDUM, England; MOLLISON, Lethnot; PATERSON, Larbert; RHIND, Forfar; SANG, Scotland; SCOTT, East Kilbride; STOR(R)I/E/Y, Shotts; THORNTON, Shotts; WADDELL, New Monkland; WILKIE, New Monkland; WILKIE, Tannadice; WYLLIE, Angus; YOUNG, Keith

Offline emmadog

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Re: 293 Canongate, Edinburgh and Cranston Street
« Reply #35 on: Saturday 22 October 16 22:56 BST (UK) »
Have only just seen this post which has proved very interesting. It interests me as many of my grandfathers rellies lived in the closes. I visited Edinburgh for the second time this year and stayed at the new Premier inn which is at the bottom of Cranston Street. While we were there we went on a tour round Mary Kings close which is situated under the city chambers. The history of the closes was very interesting and well worth a visit. Anyhow whilst the I bought a book "A guide th the royal mile" which is about the closes on the Royal Mile.
Midcommon Close is marked as no public access.
Cranston Street was names in 1874 after Robert Cranston founder of the Cranston Temperance hotels and councillor for Canongate.
Cranston House formerly Canongate Christian Institute (1828-1930) and is now Edinburgh school of English which teaches English as a foreign language.
At the beginning of the booK a CLOSE is stated as being an entry to a tenement, also possibly offering access at the back of the building. At one time there was a gate at the front entrance which
as closed at night. Also describes an alley between two buildings.
Barbara.
DURHAM - Johnson
NORTHUMBERLAND - Hunter,  Pigdon, Hansen, Waddell?, Turnbull
LANCASHIRE - Crabtree
SCOTLAND - Mallachin or Mallichan or Mallaghan
NORWAY - Hansen