Author Topic: Linsey Weaving  (Read 352 times)

Offline dmbtmartin

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 17
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Linsey Weaving
« on: Sunday 23 October 16 22:41 BST (UK) »
Dear all,

I was wondering if someone could assist with an explanation of what constituted linsey weaving?

I gather it was a cottage industry and the term itself seems peculiar to Cumbria. Some of my ancestors were linsey weavers in Kendal. If i put "linsey weaving" in the British Newspaper Archive it returns 18 articles all from the region.

If linsey means the same as Linsey-Woolsey then I understand it is a 'strong, coarse fabric with a linen or cotton warp and a woollen weft'. That seems to make sense. However, Linsey Weaving seems almost always to be mentioned in the same sentence as 'fancy and linsey' or 'waistcoat weaving' which feels somewhat at odds. Perhaps I am overthinking this!

Any help much appreciated!


RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline KGarrad

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 21,504
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Linsey Weaving
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 23 October 16 23:19 BST (UK) »
Tricky!

But I think it's where you have a linen warp, and a wool weft?

The warp is the set of lengthwise yarns, that are held under tension.
The weft is the yarn that is inserted over-and-under the warp threads.

Using linen (made from flax) was cheaper than using all wool.

Linsey-woolsey - a strong, coarse fabric with a linen or cotton warp and a woollen weft.
Garrad (Suffolk, Essex, Somerset), Crocker (Somerset), Vanstone (Devon, Jersey), Sims (Wiltshire), Bridger (Kent)

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.