Author Topic: BRASH in and near Abercorn  (Read 1176 times)

Offline Fordyce

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Re: BRASH in and near Abercorn
« Reply #18 on: Wednesday 26 July 17 00:17 BST (UK) »
Hi Dorrie,
Four others:
- George Chattam, born 26-2-1877 died 21-4-1877 of hereditary syphilis
- George Chattam, born 17-5-1885 died 22-12-1886 of scarlet fever
- William Chattam, born 25-3-1889 died 9-10-1889 of chronic diarrhoea
- Sarah Chattam, born 30-3-1893 died 1-6-1900 (as Sarah Chatham) of pulmonary phthisis

Oddly, son John b 1879 was recorded as Chattie upon birth and death.
I take it you've got wind of dau Margaret's conviction for bigamy in 1918?!

My gtgtgdfather is John Chattie b 1809/10 Abercorn s/o Thomas Shatton & Agnes Chapman. I've never found a birth record for him (nor his siblings for that matter, even though the Abercorn OPR has records of the deaths of their youngsters and there is an MI in Abercorn churchyard, so they were established church). The first record of John is when, as John Chattie a joiner at Liberton Dams, he married Mary Pentland from Little France on 28-11-1833 in Liberton. After a couple of children in Liberton, they had moved to Glasgow by 25-5-1837. It seems to be in the 1850s when he and his entire family took to Chatham.

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Offline Forfarian

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Re: BRASH in and near Abercorn
« Reply #19 on: Wednesday 26 July 17 09:05 BST (UK) »
Last year I learned (the hard way, but not me personally) that chronic diarrhoea is one of the symptoms of cancer of the pancreas. The tumour inhibits the production of the enzymes necessary for digestion of food, and the sufferer dies of starvation/malnutrition. Though in the case of William, who died in infancy, cancer was probably not the cause of his diarrhoea.
Researching

AITKENHEAD, Lanarkshire; BINNY, Forfar; BLACK, New Monkland; BRYSON, Cumbernauld; BURGESS, North-East Scotland; CRUICKSHANK, Rothes; DALLAS, Botriphnie; DAVIDSON, Oyne; GUTHRIE, Angus; HOGG, Larbert; LESLIE, Rothes/Mortlach; MENDUM, England; MOLLISON, Lethnot; PATERSON, Larbert; RHIND, Forfar; SANG, Scotland; SCOTT, East Kilbride; STOR(R)I/E/Y, Shotts; THORNTON, Shotts; WADDELL, New Monkland; WILKIE, New Monkland; WILKIE, Tannadice; WYLLIE, Angus; YOUNG, Keith

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Offline Fordyce

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Re: BRASH in and near Abercorn
« Reply #20 on: Wednesday 26 July 17 15:23 BST (UK) »
By coincidence I've just finished reading Guthrie Hutton's short history of Shale Oil (2010) as well as Harry Knox's tour de force Vanished Railways of West Lothian (2017) (and have seen the recent TV program on James 'Paraffin' Young). This Chattam family lived in and just off Greendykes Road which was right in the middle of the shale fields. Others will know better than I do I'm sure, but these houses were built for the workers by the various Oil and Shale companies and were generally of desparately appalling quality.

In 1901 the Chattams lived at 48 Stewartfield, one of 92 Broxburn Oil Co's houses "cradled by the Albyn crude oil works bing, a location that even the most inventive estate agent would have had difficulty putting a gloss on" (Guthrie Hutton). A report into the state of this housing in 1914 was scathing - toilets newly installed (none before), one to two families, were opposite each other on gable ends, offering no privacy or decency, and should be condemned even though new. There's a photo in his book on page 40 of Stewartfield, and others of Greendykes Road.

Their father Alexander Chattam at this time was a Retortman (from 1882 to 1891 at least) presumably either chucking shale in at the top or retrieving burnt shale at the bottom to go to the bing. At least he wasn't a miner.

The Museum of the Scottish Shale Oil Industry is now a must-see. It's industry which I hardly knew existed until recently. At one time, the area had the biggest oil refinery In The World no less. Fascinating stuff!

Offline dowdstree

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Re: BRASH in and near Abercorn
« Reply #21 on: Wednesday 26 July 17 17:38 BST (UK) »
Thanks for your information Fordyce.

The 1911 Census, which I have just looked at on SP,  shows that Sarah and Alexander had 11 children born alive of which 4 were still living. With the others you kindly gave me that means there are 2 still to trace. Well that will be for another day probably when I visit SP.

Poor wee George dying from hereditary syphilis.

I am going to send you a PM if you don't mind regarding Margaret and Alexander.

Thanks again.



Dorrie
Small, Dundee
Dickson, Dundee
Patrick, Scotland
Easson, Scotland
Small, Co. Antrim
Madden, Co. Westmeath
Dickson, Co. Down