Author Topic: Learning Welsh  (Read 2310 times)

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Learning Welsh
« Reply #45 on: Wednesday 01 March 17 21:09 GMT (UK) »
Welsh Poet Laureate was on the arts programme "Front Row" on BBC Radio 4 tonight to mark St. David's Day. He recited his poem "Umbrella" in Welsh, each verse followed by his English translation. Then he explained rhyming and alliteration in Welsh poetry. He was born in London.
 There should be more about Wales and Welsh on BBC nationwide.
Happy St. David's Day to all.

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Offline pinot

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Re: Learning Welsh
« Reply #46 on: Friday 03 March 17 01:09 GMT (UK) »
28 is dau ddeg wyth (literally, two tens eight) :)  The Welsh language has maths built into the way we say the numbers.

Indeed, although we are now taught strictly (number of tens) ten (number), so eleven is un deg un, twelve un deg dau etc, whereas it was a lot different in the original number system.





The other way of saying it (which isn't the way that you're being taught) is to say "wyth ar hugain" which is literally "eight and twenty".
Trystan's 'eight and twenty' reminded me of 'four and twenty blackbirds', which is by now an archaic method of counting; it's also worth remembering the former English method of counting by 'scores' (20's), which mirrors the older Welsh counting system Trystan refers to; remember, too, the remnant of 'score' counting in French with the 'quatre vingt' (80).

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Offline Ayashi

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Re: Learning Welsh
« Reply #47 on: Friday 03 March 17 08:21 GMT (UK) »
Indeed Pinot. I'm learning how to say the time at the moment, which is the old system, so I'll end up learning both. :)

Offline confused73

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Re: Learning Welsh
« Reply #48 on: Friday 03 March 17 10:01 GMT (UK) »
I have been struggling to learn Welsh for years, struggling as I am bad at learning other languages,but love doing it.  and still going to classes, and have been lucky enough to have made friends who still come to the same group. There are lots of books designed for learners, story books and I find that they are very good. I can send you some titles if you are interested. Can you not find a class near you . Look under Welsh for Adults. If you cannot manage classes they also run Sadwrn Siarads, a day of Welsh for all levels. They are great fun as you meet lots of people who are learning.These are run about four times a year.
  Oh ,I also worry about using correct Welsh, but if you want to use Welsh out in the street , colloquial Welsh is more useful.  Hywl



Bottle,Wheatley Marsh, Williams, Dowling,    Penrose, Gilbert

Offline Ayashi

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Re: Learning Welsh
« Reply #49 on: Friday 03 March 17 10:06 GMT (UK) »
I don't suppose there are any classes near me and I wouldn't want to attend one either- I have Asperger's and dislike being in groups so my main aim when I started was being able to communicate in writing. I may never actually speak it verbally, although you never know.

Please do tell me the titles, I'll have a look at those. It might be nice simply to have a book in Welsh!

Diolch

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Learning Welsh
« Reply #50 on: Friday 03 March 17 20:32 GMT (UK) »
When I was learning Irish my young cousins gave me their old story and reading books. The pictures helped a lot! I've also read some Italian picture books, although I've never learnt Italian.

Offline pinot

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Re: Learning Welsh
« Reply #51 on: Tuesday 07 March 17 00:21 GMT (UK) »
maes-e.com is a free Welsh-language forum which you can join fairly painlessly and is divided into various areas of discussion; I don't think it has a space specifically for learners, but I hope you might hit on a room that you would find suitable to your needs. You are free to wander around different rooms and read posts without committing yourself, but if, as I hope, you find somewhere that would suit you, then give it a go. Don't be shy and explain you're needs and you may be pleased. Anonymous and little trolling, no orthography rules.
                               Pob hwyl  :)

Offline Ayashi

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Re: Learning Welsh
« Reply #52 on: Tuesday 07 March 17 03:18 GMT (UK) »
Diolch. I've saved that website; it is beyond my skill level at the moment :)

Offline trystan

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Re: Learning Welsh
« Reply #53 on: Tuesday 07 March 17 11:31 GMT (UK) »
I've just found this on YouTube:

www.youtube.com/user/HwbTV "Dal Ati" (it means "keep at it")

And other resources and links on the S4C site for this on:

www.s4c.cymru/dysgwyr

Even though you might not be able to understand much of what you hear to start off with, it might be helpful to hear the sound of it and start picking up the rhythm of the words. Also, what's great about the set of videos is that it has people from different areas of wales too.

Just found this site - just love it for its title:

http://clwbmalucachu.co.uk/cmc/ (archive of the materials) and http://clwbmalucachu.co.uk/

If you want to search in your area for welsh groups (they are all around the world), then you'd search for "Cymdeithas Cymraeg" or "Welsh Society"

Trystan



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