Author Topic: Soutar in Angus in 19th century  (Read 1118 times)

Offline Forfarian

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 7,852
  • I HAVE edited my profile - several times!
    • View Profile
Re: Soutar in Angus in 19th century
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 05 December 17 04:51 GMT (UK) »
I do realise that it is difficult to get information in Scotland without paying.  However, if I identified the parents, I would want their parents and siblings, so that it can become never ending.  Consequently, I try to get family tree information from sites where I donít have to pay - in principle.
Not only is is easier to get information in Scotland than in almost every other country, it is also cheaper than most.

Just be glad you are not trying to do the same research in England and Wales, where the information collected is inferior, and every certificate costs more than six times what a Scottish one costs, or a mere four times if it's one of the ones that is being experimentally offered online. Or various parts of Australia where one certificate can cost two or three times what even an English one costs.

See http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=714261.0
Researching

AITKENHEAD, Lanarkshire; BINNY, Forfar; BLACK, New Monkland; BRYSON, Cumbernauld; BURGESS, North-East Scotland; CRUICKSHANK, Rothes; DALLAS, Botriphnie; DAVIDSON, Oyne; GUTHRIE, Angus; HOGG, Larbert; LESLIE, Rothes/Mortlach; MENDUM, England; MOLLISON, Lethnot; PATERSON, Larbert; RHIND, Forfar; SANG, Scotland; SCOTT, East Kilbride; STOR(R)I/E/Y, Shotts; THORNTON, Shotts; WADDELL, New Monkland; WILKIE, New Monkland; WILKIE, Tannadice; WYLLIE, Angus; YOUNG, Keith

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline Bruce42

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 39
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Soutar in Angus in 19th century
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday 05 December 17 10:13 GMT (UK) »
Charlesís father, John Soutar, was also a blacksmith.

I too have considered Soutar and Souter, as well as Jane and Jean, interchangeable.

I have more information on Jane Soutar, my great grandmother:

Also known as Jean Souter.  As a child, lived at The Drums, Glen Clova.
In 1881 Jane was a widow farming at Whitehaugh (or White Haugh) Farm House, Clova, Angus employing 1 man and 1 boy, with her children David 15, Jeannie 13, and William 8.
'Depopulation...due to clearances for shooting...In the upper glen, only two houses were occupied...Whitehaugh (occupied) by a tenacious woman and young children...The stubborn survivor was Mrs Robbie in Whitehaugh, born Jane Souter, the blacksmith's daughter.  She had kept on Whitehaugh...and continued to farm after everyone had gone...The rest of the family had left the glen.  It was perhaps when son David died of TB in 1895 that she gave up the struggle and retired with Jeanie to a cottage at Crossmill, close to her married daughter and a pair of young granddaughters (where reportedly the pugnacious old lady attempted to govern Rottal.)   From "Glen Clova through the ages" - by Flora Davidson

This "Little Granny" was very small and lived at Crossmill (or Crossmiln) in her latter years.  She was a very religious, sweet, gentle, friendly person who even in her nineties looked a picture in a black dress, white shawl and crocheted white lace cap with black ribbon.  She died in 1928 aged 96.  In those far off days, Crossmill was thought of as a fairy cottage smothered in flowers: roses everywhere, honeysuckle framing the gateway, the water trough surrounded by fury mimulus and on either side of the door steps, clumps of mignonette.  Her daughter, Ann Winter Ogilvy nee Robbie, was always referred to as "Big Granny"

Jane was a very small lady and was the "Little Granny" who soaked grain in whisky (or maize in cheap brandy), spreading it over the yard to attract the grouse, while the beaters were out on the Rottal Lodge estate.  The grouse would be seen staggering around, and little Granny would pick them up, wring their necks and put into a water butt (or trough), saying: "Och, the purr wee thingees, I'll just hae to put them oot o' their misery!"

She was said to sleep in a curtained wall-bed in the kitchen, living on bannocks (oatcakes), home-made butter, brimstone and treacle, and tea brewed all day on the range until it was black and rank.
ogilvy, larg, row, rowe, house, bendall, hodgetts, hawker, clarke, ancell, stenton-dozey, chaplin, robbie, bartlett, christie, robson, soutar, winter, little

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline JanBarnes

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 2
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Soutar in Angus in 19th century
« Reply #11 on: Wednesday 06 December 17 10:52 GMT (UK) »
Thank you, Forfarian & Bruce42. Very informative. Some records are so detailed and complete, and, alas, others are nonexistent - all part of the intriguing puzzle! And yes, it is the Drums in Clova in the case of our Souters. Love your comment on certificate costs: here in Australia, download copies are $25.10 and actual Certificates $35! Each! ScotlandsPeople’s costs are a breath of fresh air!