Author Topic: Gaelic translation of McGilichallum or McGillichallum  (Read 846 times)

Offline Munro84

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Gaelic translation of McGilichallum or McGillichallum
« on: Saturday 04 March 17 19:56 GMT (UK) »
Hi,

Can anyone give me the definitive translation of the name McGilichallum, sometimes spelt with a double l as McGillichallum ?

I am thinking son of Gil, son of Callum

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline djct59

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 364
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Gaelic translation of McGilichallum or McGillichallum
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 04 March 17 20:00 GMT (UK) »
Probably a phonetic rendition of MacGhill'icChallum, in which case I'd say your guess is bang on - son of Gilbert son of Callum

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline Munro84

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Gaelic translation of McGilichallum or McGillichallum
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 04 March 17 20:28 GMT (UK) »
Probably a phonetic rendition of MacGhill'icChallum, in which case I'd say your guess is bang on - son of Gilbert son of Callum

Thanks, Gilbert is extremely important to me.

Cheers.

Offline Paul S.

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 548
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Gaelic translation of McGilichallum or McGillichallum
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 04 March 17 20:56 GMT (UK) »
MacGilli--- often derives from "son of the servant of---"; so, son of the servant of Callum. The name Cal(l)um may relate to St Columba.

Offline Munro84

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Gaelic translation of McGilichallum or McGillichallum
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 04 March 17 21:58 GMT (UK) »
Hi both, thanks for the replies. I have also found two other explanations:

One is simply "son of Malcom" and was used as such as the patronymic of the chiefs of the MacLeods of Lewis.

The other also apparently relates to the founder of that clan as "son of the youthful Colin".

I would however be interested in how the above theory of son of Gilbert came about because there was a Gilbert a few generations down the line in the family I am researching.

Offline djct59

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 364
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Gaelic translation of McGilichallum or McGillichallum
« Reply #5 on: Saturday 04 March 17 22:03 GMT (UK) »
Gilbert is not a wholly rare name in 18th century Sutherland

Offline Rosinish

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 9,804
  • PASSED & PAST (Speciality - South Uist, Inverness)
    • View Profile
Re: Gaelic translation of McGilichallum or McGillichallum
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 04 March 17 22:25 GMT (UK) »
My interpretation for McGilichallum would be son of Gil/Gilbert, grandson of Malcolm.

Annie

Added Or son of Gil/Archibald (Gilleasbaig being Archibald), grandson of Malcolm?
South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie, MacDonald, MacInnes, MacIntyre, MacKinnon, Steele, Walker

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, MacKinnon, MacPhee

"OLD GENEALOGISTS NEVER DIE - THEY JUST LOSE THEIR CENSUS"

Offline Munro84

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Gaelic translation of McGilichallum or McGillichallum
« Reply #7 on: Sunday 05 March 17 10:37 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for the replies. The person I am investigating is an Alexander McGilichallum Munro who is listed in 1745 in Milntown (parish of Kilmuir Easter) on  page 120 of David Dobson's book "Scottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration 1725 - 1775: The Northern Highlands"  (https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=UCfdGz0qv1kC&pg=PA120&lpg=PA120&dq=Munro,+Alexander+McGilichallum&source=bl&ots=2q0O2SZZpG&sig=XzvzlJ2giyYeF4U7GCJ_2QHGiNo&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjo1d-32r3SAhXoBsAKHTtWDS8Q6AEIIjAB#v=onepage&q=Munro%2C%20Alexander%20McGilichallum&f=false)

There are two other Munros in different parishes in the same year with same alias and also someone with the surname Ross, again in a different parish with the same alias all in the same year of 1745. I am just wondering if this alias is more of a descriptive nickname rather than a description of lineage.

So far I have found and been given the following interpretations:

son of Gilbert son of Callum
son of the servant of Callum
son of Malcom
son of the youthful Colin
son of Gil/Gilbert, grandson of Malcolm
son of Gil/Archibald (Gilleasbaig being Archibald), grandson of Malcolm

McGilli/Gille etc does seem to commonly be son of the servant. For example Clan MacMillan: MacGillemhaoil which means "son of the tonsured servant".

Although if I have the lineage correct, the above mentioned Alexander McGilichallum Munro's brother, David Munro, had a grandson named Gilbert Munro, who could have been named after his great-grandfather/his father's grandfather Gilbert which is where the alias could have come from.

There are actually four with this name in the above mentioned book, although some are spelt with a double l:

Munro, Alexander McGilichallum in Milntown, soldier of George Munro of Culcairn's Independent Company, 1745. (parish of Kilmuir Easter, Ross-shire).
Munro, William McGilichallum in Balcony, soldier of George Munro of Culcairn's Independent Company, 1745. (parish of Kiltearn, Ross-shire).
Ross, John McGillichallum in Newtown, soldier of George Munro of Culcairn's Independent Company, 1745. (parish of Alness, Ross-shire).
Munro, George McGillichallum in Foulis, soldier of George Munro of Culcairn's Independent Company, 1745. (parish of Kiltearn, Ross-shire).
MacGillichallum, John in Langwell, Applecross, Wester Ross, 1718



Offline anabanana

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 336
  • Ruairidh Ali Mor at Benula
    • View Profile
Re: Gaelic translation of McGilichallum or McGillichallum
« Reply #8 on: Friday 01 September 17 08:31 BST (UK) »
When you see Gill or similar like that , it can mean boy or lad so "Son of the Lad, Calum" ... Calum is derived from the name Malcolm
Sutherland, Inverness-shire, Aberdeenshire, Ross-shire, Banffshire

MacRae, MacLeod, MacPherson, MacQueen, Nicolson, Lobban, Riddoxh, Mann, Bertram