Author Topic: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help  (Read 2079 times)

Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #27 on: Friday 24 March 17 18:20 GMT (UK) »
Yes, I remember pan-stick! same blue colour of case that the mascara had - I found both, actually, fossilised in an ordinary make-up bag in the depths of a large metal "Leichner" stage makeup box, when I came upon it in the loft. "5&9", supposedly flesh tints ( sticks of varied shades of the same ready made up, also) "Spotlight" makeup to apply with a damp sponge, as a foundation.... large round greasy tins / plastic tubs of remover and tinted powder, complete with velour "puff" to apply latter ... a theatrical treasure chest! Drawers with crepe ( can't "do" a circumflex, sorry) hair, dried up spirit gum, all sorts of tatty stuff.
So I carefully put it all back.
Threlfall (Southport), Isherwood (lancs & Canada), Newbould + Topliss(Derby), Keating & Cummins (Ireland + lancs), Fisher, Strong& Casson (all Cumberland) & Downie & Bowie, Linlithgow area Scotland . Also interested in Leigh& Burrows,(Lancashire) Griffiths (Shropshire & lancs), Leaver (Lancs/Yorks) & Anderson(Cumberland and very elusive)

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Online Rena

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Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #28 on: Friday 24 March 17 19:39 GMT (UK) »
Yes, I remember pan-stick!
"Leichner" stage makeup box, when I came upon it in the loft. "5&9", supposedly flesh tints ( sticks of varied shades of the same ready made up, also)

Leichner was really expensive.  In the 50s and 60s our department at work had a "didlum", to enable us girls to treat ourselves to makeup.  Each week for twenty weeks we each put in one shilling ( = 5 new pence) and each week one girl would take a one pound (1.00) "token" to one specific small town centre shop where she could choose from any of the shop's contents to the value of 1.00, plus cash for any ovespend.  I bought liquid Leichner which lasted for ages.  Thirty years later my 6ft son was buying the same product  ;D   ;D   (he was a budding Olivier).
Aberdeen: Findlay-Shirras,McCarthy
MidLothian: Mason,Telford,Darling,Cruikshanks,Bennett,Sime, Bell
Lanarks:Crum, Brown, MacKenzie,Cameron, Glen, Millar
Ross, Urray:Mackenzie
Moray: Findlay; Marshall/Marischell
Perthshire: Brown Ferguson
Wales: McCarthy, Thomas
England: Almond, Askin, Dodson, Harrison, Maw, McCarthy, Munford, Pye, Shearing, Smith, Smythe, Speight, Strike, Wallis/Wallace, Ward, Wells
Germany: Flamme,Ehlers, Bielstein, Germer, Mohlm, Reupke

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Offline parkway ma

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Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #29 on: Thursday 30 November 17 03:57 GMT (UK) »
What a lovely subject you've chosen and congratulations on your hard work and success.

I entered my teenage years at the start of the 1950s.  That decade was when small "dress shops" disappeared and "boutiques" appeared.  As already mentioned before there was no such thing as a "teenager" in those days.  Shops didn't cater for them which meant that unless you measured the smallest "standard" size of 34" bust, 24" waist and 36" hips you either had to wear clothes designed for children or make your own (I still have all my dressmaking patterns from that era).  Fashion followed what the film stars were wearing in the latest films, then dress manufacturers would quickly copy them and have them in the shops toute suite. The same with hairstyles - my first "grown up" hair style was circa 1952 and called "the pony look". I recall Audrey Hepburn's 1950s short "urchin cut" was a big favourite.  The wide shouldered tailored look of the auster 1940s vanished overnight when the camel (coloured) coats appeared.   Accessories were an important part of all the looks and I remember my pal chose to wear a red hat, red handbag, red leather gloves and red shoes with hers and my accessories were green. Shoe shops sold all the leather goods and if the shop didn't have a matching shade they'd actually dye the item for you.  For instance, for my first ball my mother bought me a beautiful peacock blue ballerina length dance dress which I took to the shoe shop where I chose a pair of white satin high heel dance shoes and asked them to dye the shoes to match.  That was the first and last time I took my mother to help teenage me choose an outfit because I spent the entire evening at the ball being a wallflower whilst all the other teenage girls and youths were dressed as teenagers and having the time of their lives  :-\
Until Brigitte Bardot appeared in a 1955 film wearing a blue checked cotton gingham flared skirted dress with nipped in waist, this material had only ever been worn by little girls in the UK but with the addition of the net underskirts and white lace summer gloves it too became high fashion that year.

Every year had its own popular colour such as "shocking pink", salmon pink, african violets, mink, "coffee and cream"   The '50s was the start of rock & roll in the UK and I joined the army of teenage girls wearing a white blouse and black taffeta full circular skirt with black flat heeled "ballet shoes", plus of coure the sugar starched net underskirts.  I remember visiting my grandmother and described that I'd been "bebopping" that week.  My grandmother always looked ancient to me and so I was surprised when she retorted "Don't think you're the only ones who've jived"  :o.  As she was born in the 1880s she probably enjoyed the 1920s "black bottom"  8)

I've got a 1956 photo of my teenage husband to be wearing a red cotton kerchief tied around his neck.  We girls wore a kerchief too but they were made from very fine chiffon and I had several of them - my father scoffed that they wouldn't keep out the cold but was surprised when I laid one on his arm that it really did.

I remember hearing the name "Dior" for the first time, I probably wouldn't have bothered to make a note of the name excepting I liked his "H" line fashion and then his later "A" line.

I remember early 1960s fashion mainly for the introduction of the long fashionable umbrellas and the late 1950s tiny summer hats had dramatically changed shape having a high dome and brim.   1960s warm winter tartan patterned tights came into fashion, as did Mary Quant's mini skirts. one reason the short hemlines were worn across the ages was because clothing for adults was taxed but girls' skirts up to a certain length were tax free (can't recall how many inches now but think it was about 11").  As the decade moved on and the 1970s came into being skirt lengths got shorter and of course the proliferate small boutiques catered for the youngsters as they had the spending power, which meant middle aged and older ladies had a hard time finding something that didn't expose their ever growing derriers to the northerly winds.
I like the styles of Audrey Hepburn as well as Marilyn Monroe, especially their 50s hairstyles( actually I guess it is their homecoming hairstyles , such as the Barrel roll blow dried hair and Half up ponytail with bouffant). My class will have a historical show about 1950s, and I need to collect the 50s hairstyles and clothes, also learn the habits people have in that time.

Online Rena

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Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #30 on: Thursday 30 November 17 12:30 GMT (UK) »

I like the styles of Audrey Hepburn as well as Marilyn Monroe, especially their 50s hairstyles( actually I guess it is their homecoming hairstyles , such as the Barrel roll blow dried hair and Half up ponytail with bouffant). My class will have a historical show about 1950s, and I need to collect the 50s hairstyles and clothes, also learn the habits people have in that time.

I can only speak about the habits of the people in the Yorkshire town that I grew up in. 

Most old men smoked a pipe and the rest of them smoked cigarettes, which were sold in packs of 5 or 10; such as cheap "Woodbine" in a blue pack, "Parkdrive" in a red pack, or the more expensive "Players Please" or "Capstan", etc.
My two brothers were teenagers in the 1950s and never wore headgear even in the rain or snow, but older men usually wore a cap or a brimmed trilby hat, which were always taken off in the house and in church, whereas women kept their hats on in church and when visiting people the older ladies took off their coats but often kept their hats on. 

My father's folk were from the west side of town and my mother's from the east side but their habits were the same.  Meals were eaten at the table, sit up straight, put your shoulders back, dont slouch, don't talk with your mouth full and if you want something, ask for it - don't lean across the table to help yourself and always say "please" and "thankyou".   Mid morning or mid afternoon refreshment meant children had to sit and eat/drink, they weren't allowed to walk about during those rituals.

There was a time and place for everything and that included the clothes you wore.  In the 1950s women at home kept their clothes clean during housework and/or cooking by wearing aprons or pinnies, which would be taken off when their work was done.  Women did wear trousers, called slacks, which were only worn for leisure.

Monday was always "washday" the only full day spent on washing a full week's dirty clothing, which in the early 1950s usually meant boiling a tub of water and using a dolly stick and posser to agitate the laundry, which then had to have the soapy water squeezed out by using a mangle and then rinsed before using the mangle again. Sheets on the bed meant each bottom sheet would be put in the wash and the top sheet would spend the next week covering the mattress.  Dinner that day would probably consist of cold left over meat accompanied by hot vegetables and a milk pudding. Tuesday was spent labouring over an ironing board using either an old fashioned coal or electric "flat iron" or a more modern electric iron that heated itself.

We ate seasonal food and always had brain food twice a week, 'brain food' being fish. 

As a child the most used phrase I heard was; "Go out and play".  This phrase was also used when as a family we'd visit other members of the family and no sooner had we greeted the adults we'd hear "Now go out and play". 
Aberdeen: Findlay-Shirras,McCarthy
MidLothian: Mason,Telford,Darling,Cruikshanks,Bennett,Sime, Bell
Lanarks:Crum, Brown, MacKenzie,Cameron, Glen, Millar
Ross, Urray:Mackenzie
Moray: Findlay; Marshall/Marischell
Perthshire: Brown Ferguson
Wales: McCarthy, Thomas
England: Almond, Askin, Dodson, Harrison, Maw, McCarthy, Munford, Pye, Shearing, Smith, Smythe, Speight, Strike, Wallis/Wallace, Ward, Wells
Germany: Flamme,Ehlers, Bielstein, Germer, Mohlm, Reupke

Offline brigidmac

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Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #31 on: Saturday 09 December 17 08:26 GMT (UK) »
Parkway ma and Rena can I quote you or let children read out your comments for the workshops please

There's a lovely cafe bar in Leicester called "the exchange" which will let me use their snug or their downstairs stage for free for events which is good cos I  be never been paid much to run workshops
The ladies toilets is decorated with sewing and knitting patterns from the 50',s and 60.s.  I love it

The Regency hotel halfway to Leicester from my town Oadby also lets me use their room for free it's mock Edwardian very appropriate when I do early 1900.'s
Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid MCDERMID McDiarmid Gardner Jones ,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson ,McKay

Online Rena

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Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #32 on: Saturday 09 December 17 16:48 GMT (UK) »
Of course you can brigidmac, I used to love hearing accounts of when my own parents were young, so I imagine your audience will be the same.  Although I doubt you will find and demonstrate the smell of "Evening In Paris" scent, which my mother always wore in the 1950s and the contrasting smell of the cold fire place first thing on a cold winter morning.

Aberdeen: Findlay-Shirras,McCarthy
MidLothian: Mason,Telford,Darling,Cruikshanks,Bennett,Sime, Bell
Lanarks:Crum, Brown, MacKenzie,Cameron, Glen, Millar
Ross, Urray:Mackenzie
Moray: Findlay; Marshall/Marischell
Perthshire: Brown Ferguson
Wales: McCarthy, Thomas
England: Almond, Askin, Dodson, Harrison, Maw, McCarthy, Munford, Pye, Shearing, Smith, Smythe, Speight, Strike, Wallis/Wallace, Ward, Wells
Germany: Flamme,Ehlers, Bielstein, Germer, Mohlm, Reupke