Author Topic: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help  (Read 2735 times)

Online LizzieW

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 10,050
    • View Profile
Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #9 on: Friday 17 March 17 16:30 GMT (UK) »
Red nails - "nice" girls didn't wear red nailpolish.  I remember when I was about 15, some girls at school looked at me and said "You'll have to wear eyebrow pencil when you're older!" and that was an insult as people didn't wear eye makeup.  Not sure why they said it because I had very dark eyebrows in any case.

Max Factor Creme Puff face powder was something most people used, just pat it all over your face and then as ThrelfallYorky says, rub it off again - and certainly no make up for school like today's girls.

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Online dowdstree

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 712
  • Mary Malcolm - 1860 to 1945
    • View Profile
Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #10 on: Friday 17 March 17 16:30 GMT (UK) »
Well done Brigidmac.

If I ever end up in a Care Home I hope there is someone like you willing to give up their time to entertain me.

Memories of the early 60's  ;D ;D  Does anyone else remember "kiss curls". Had to twist our hair round at the side of our face and cellotape it overnight. Perfect in the morning with your hair backcombed and lots of hairspray.

I remember the starched petticoats too. Also sewing a hoop into the hem of a petticoat which was OK unless you sat down the wrong way and it lifted up showing suspenders and stockings.

Oh the good old days  :'( :'(

Dorrie
Small, Dundee
Dickson, Dundee
Patrick, Scotland
Easson, Scotland
Small, Co. Antrim
Madden, Co. Westmeath
Dickson, Co. Down

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline sami

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,824
  • Grannie M
    • View Profile
Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #11 on: Wednesday 22 March 17 02:12 GMT (UK) »
I had completely forgotten about "kiss curls" and the tape used to hold them so that they dried to shape. Not sure how we ever slept properly with tape, pins and rollers  ::) Then all the prep in the morning with teasing and hair spray. Then the 20 minute walk to school in rainy, humid weather to spend another 15 - 20 minutes in the school washroom trying to repair the rain damage. Just have to laugh about it now  ;D

sami
England:  Archer, Bailey, Bates, Blower, Bosworth, Court, Hicklin, Orton, Palmer, Robbins, Sedgwick, Smith, Stevenson, Stone, Varnam, Wakelin, Walker
Canada:  Archer, Walker, Spencer, Shepherd
Australia:  Taplin
South Africa:  Risley

Offline brigidmac

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,425
  • Computer incompetent but stiil trying
    • View Profile
Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #12 on: Wednesday 22 March 17 07:52 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for these memories i don't know if I can split them into 50's and 60's

I want to start with smells again ....
for a change the death/ blind lady will not be at a  total disadvantage

Smells of 50's will be Yardley lavender and Brill cream if i can find any

I. Think Brut and Aqua.   ? Orangey  perfume may be typical 60','s or is that 70's ?
Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid MCDERMID McDiarmid Gardner Jones ,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson ,McKay

Offline Rena

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,218
  • Crown Copyright: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #13 on: Wednesday 22 March 17 08:28 GMT (UK) »
What a lovely subject you've chosen and congratulations on your hard work and success.

I entered my teenage years at the start of the 1950s.  That decade was when small "dress shops" disappeared and "boutiques" appeared.  As already mentioned before there was no such thing as a "teenager" in those days.  Shops didn't cater for them which meant that unless you measured the smallest "standard" size of 34" bust, 24" waist and 36" hips you either had to wear clothes designed for children or make your own (I still have all my dressmaking patterns from that era).  Fashion followed what the film stars were wearing in the latest films, then dress manufacturers would quickly copy them and have them in the shops toute suite. The same with hairstyles - my first "grown up" hair style was circa 1952 and called "the pony look". I recall Audrey Hepburn's 1950s short "urchin cut" was a big favourite.  The wide shouldered tailored look of the auster 1940s vanished overnight when the camel (coloured) coats appeared.   Accessories were an important part of all the looks and I remember my pal chose to wear a red hat, red handbag, red leather gloves and red shoes with hers and my accessories were green. Shoe shops sold all the leather goods and if the shop didn't have a matching shade they'd actually dye the item for you.  For instance, for my first ball my mother bought me a beautiful peacock blue ballerina length dance dress which I took to the shoe shop where I chose a pair of white satin high heel dance shoes and asked them to dye the shoes to match.  That was the first and last time I took my mother to help teenage me choose an outfit because I spent the entire evening at the ball being a wallflower whilst all the other teenage girls and youths were dressed as teenagers and having the time of their lives  :-\
Until Brigitte Bardot appeared in a 1955 film wearing a blue checked cotton gingham flared skirted dress with nipped in waist, this material had only ever been worn by little girls in the UK but with the addition of the net underskirts and white lace summer gloves it too became high fashion that year.

Every year had its own popular colour such as "shocking pink", salmon pink, african violets, mink, "coffee and cream"   The '50s was the start of rock & roll in the UK and I joined the army of teenage girls wearing a white blouse and black taffeta full circular skirt with black flat heeled "ballet shoes", plus of coure the sugar starched net underskirts.  I remember visiting my grandmother and described that I'd been "bebopping" that week.  My grandmother always looked ancient to me and so I was surprised when she retorted "Don't think you're the only ones who've jived"  :o.  As she was born in the 1880s she probably enjoyed the 1920s "black bottom"  8)

I've got a 1956 photo of my teenage husband to be wearing a red cotton kerchief tied around his neck.  We girls wore a kerchief too but they were made from very fine chiffon and I had several of them - my father scoffed that they wouldn't keep out the cold but was surprised when I laid one on his arm that it really did.

I remember hearing the name "Dior" for the first time, I probably wouldn't have bothered to make a note of the name excepting I liked his "H" line fashion and then his later "A" line.

I remember early 1960s fashion mainly for the introduction of the long fashionable umbrellas and the late 1950s tiny summer hats had dramatically changed shape having a high dome and brim.   1960s warm winter tartan patterned tights came into fashion, as did Mary Quant's mini skirts. one reason the short hemlines were worn across the ages was because clothing for adults was taxed but girls' skirts up to a certain length were tax free (can't recall how many inches now but think it was about 11").  As the decade moved on and the 1970s came into being skirt lengths got shorter and of course the proliferate small boutiques catered for the youngsters as they had the spending power, which meant middle aged and older ladies had a hard time finding something that didn't expose their ever growing derriers to the northerly winds.
Aberdeen: Findlay-Shirras,McCarthy
MidLothian: Mason,Telford,Darling,Cruikshanks,Bennett,Sime, Bell
Lanarks:Crum, Brown, MacKenzie,Cameron, Glen, Millar
Ross, Urray:Mackenzie
Moray: Findlay; Marshall/Marischell
Perthshire: Brown Ferguson
Wales: McCarthy, Thomas
England: Almond, Askin, Dodson, Harrison, Maw, McCarthy, Munford, Pye, Shearing, Smith, Smythe, Speight, Strike, Wallis/Wallace, Ward, Wells
Germany: Flamme,Ehlers, Bielstein, Germer, Mohlm, Reupke

Offline Rena

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,218
  • Crown Copyright: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #14 on: Wednesday 22 March 17 08:42 GMT (UK) »
The 1950s perfume was "Evening In Paris" which was sold in little blue glass bottles.  My grandmother and some other old ladies I knew didn't use pefume but afte doing the laundry or after washing pots would all use the same skin softener of glycerine and rose water, eg. into a cupped hand they'd pour a drop or two of glycerine and a small splash of rose water which they rubbed into the skin of their hands.

The favourite aftershave for men that I knew was "Old Spice".

1950s-1960s: My grandmother still used mothballs in her wardrobe but my mother and her sisters all had little lavender bags in theirs.
Aberdeen: Findlay-Shirras,McCarthy
MidLothian: Mason,Telford,Darling,Cruikshanks,Bennett,Sime, Bell
Lanarks:Crum, Brown, MacKenzie,Cameron, Glen, Millar
Ross, Urray:Mackenzie
Moray: Findlay; Marshall/Marischell
Perthshire: Brown Ferguson
Wales: McCarthy, Thomas
England: Almond, Askin, Dodson, Harrison, Maw, McCarthy, Munford, Pye, Shearing, Smith, Smythe, Speight, Strike, Wallis/Wallace, Ward, Wells
Germany: Flamme,Ehlers, Bielstein, Germer, Mohlm, Reupke

Online LizzieW

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 10,050
    • View Profile
Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #15 on: Wednesday 22 March 17 09:06 GMT (UK) »
And I remember wearing white crochet like gloves when I went out, as did my friends.  I guess that must have come from someone wearing them in a film.

I never went to a ball, only "teenage hops" in the scout hall, but it was around 1956/57 when I was 15/16 that I started to go out, before that I was considered too young, apart from going to first brownies, and then guides.

Offline Bearnan

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 143
  • Annie and Sophie
    • View Profile
Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #16 on: Wednesday 22 March 17 09:32 GMT (UK) »
My mom used to use 4711 eau de cologne.......and buy it for me, yuk.  Good for dabbing on a cold sore though.

White shoes, either high heels or flatties, wore them all the time. Even got away with the flatties for school.  ;D
Cattell,Ainsworth/Ensor,Spilsbury,Smith,Phillips,Wall,Collins.England
Walsh,Lewis.England and Ireland.

Offline ThrelfallYorky

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,054
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Laughter facilitator ...Thanks for the help
« Reply #17 on: Wednesday 22 March 17 14:18 GMT (UK) »
There was a sort of orange-y perfume, quite cheap and nasty, I believe, called "Aquamanda" that was fashionable in the 1960s - I remember a cousin asking for it.
Tights were not available for all throughout the 1960s - short, with small feet and slim legs, I'd tried, but ended up turning them over coins at the top to try to avoid droopy wrinkles round the ankles (it didn't) - so I was subject to the tyranny of the suspender belt for a bit longer than most of my contemporaries! When I did find tights that fitted I was so delighted..... and patterned ones that fitted! Wonderful!
And boots! Yes, there was a time before fashion boots. Funny little black suede zip-up-the-front ones, about ankle high, by Morlands, very sensible if you had to plod to school through foul weather, but not exactly thrilling, when you'd rather have been wearing fashionable shoes. Do you remember the white plastic pseudo "Courreges" boots, later - discoloured to dingy yellowish quite quickly, and not very nice to wear?
Droopy brimmed hats in felt, with always a gauzy scarf tied round instead of a hat-ribbon?
Good heavens, the strange things we thought were high fashion - and that we thought actually suited us!
Threlfall (Southport), Isherwood (lancs & Canada), Newbould + Topliss(Derby), Keating & Cummins (Ireland + lancs), Fisher, Strong& Casson (all Cumberland) & Downie & Bowie, Linlithgow area Scotland . Also interested in Leigh& Burrows,(Lancashire) Griffiths (Shropshire & lancs), Leaver (Lancs/Yorks) & Anderson(Cumberland and very elusive)