Author Topic: possible translation  (Read 803 times)

Offline ballydw

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possible translation
« on: Sunday 02 April 17 22:39 BST (UK) »
The gaelic word DEIRBH is there an english translation thank you

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Offline Rosinish

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Re: possible translation
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 02 April 17 23:34 BST (UK) »
I believe a lot of gaelic words can mean different things depending on the context it's written.

Do you have a sentence with 'Deirbh' in it?

There are only 18 letters in the gaelic alphabet.

'bh' or 'mh' would both be the equivalent of a 'v'.

However, a quick search online gives the meaning as 'churn'.

Would this fit with what you have?

Annie
South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie, MacDonald, MacInnes, MacIntyre, MacKinnon, Steele, Walker

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, MacKinnon, MacPhee

"OLD GENEALOGISTS NEVER DIE - THEY JUST LOSE THEIR CENSUS"

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Offline ballydw

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Re: possible translation
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 02 April 17 23:50 BST (UK) »
I believe a lot of gaelic words can mean different things depending on the context it's written.

Do you have a sentence with 'Deirbh' in it?

There are only 18 letters in the gaelic alphabet.

'bh' or 'mh' would both be the equivalent of a 'v'.

However, a quick search online gives the meaning as 'churn'.

Would this fit with what you have?

Annie
tks Annie - my maternal ancestors were surname Murphy and as there were several families in the same parish by this name my Murphys were known as the Murphy Deirbh so I have no explanation for this word - They were farmers so maybe the "churn" would fit :)

Offline Rosinish

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Re: possible translation
« Reply #3 on: Monday 03 April 17 00:05 BST (UK) »
From what you say it may relate to the occupation?

It may even have related to an area which is possible?

Do you know where they lived?

I will see if I can find out any more but may take a while, not tonight is what I mean.

Annie


South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie, MacDonald, MacInnes, MacIntyre, MacKinnon, Steele, Walker

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, MacKinnon, MacPhee

"OLD GENEALOGISTS NEVER DIE - THEY JUST LOSE THEIR CENSUS"

Offline Rosinish

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Re: possible translation
« Reply #4 on: Monday 03 April 17 00:53 BST (UK) »
From someone born & bred gaelic spoken....

"Depends on context - could mean 'certain', or if it's a noun it would mean 'churn', as in a container for making butter"

I mentioned I had found the word 'certain' but the spelling was different & the reply was.....

"Some words change spelling due to grammar rules! I reckon in this case it's probably a churn, but without any more context it's tricky"

I mentioned the family were Farmers & the reply was that it probably related to that.

Hope that's helped?

Annie

Added, Are you certain of the spelling as another has mentioned possibly a place name (in the context of the use)?
South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie, MacDonald, MacInnes, MacIntyre, MacKinnon, Steele, Walker

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, MacKinnon, MacPhee

"OLD GENEALOGISTS NEVER DIE - THEY JUST LOSE THEIR CENSUS"

Offline shanghaipanda

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Offline ballydw

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Re: possible translation
« Reply #6 on: Monday 03 April 17 19:57 BST (UK) »
This may be of some interest to you .. includes Murphy (deirbh)

http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/john-ohart/irish-pedigrees-or-the-origin-and-stem-of-the-irish-nation-volume-1-rah-554/page-82-irish-pedigrees-or-the-origin-and-stem-of-the-irish-nation-volume-1-rah-554.shtml
Thank you makes very interesting reading. My Murphy dearbh were residents of Kilmichael co cork through generations & my 3xgreat grandfather John Murphy was the only survivor of the Deshure Ambush in 1822 - his brother Denis was hung.