Author Topic: Migration within UK 1780s  (Read 607 times)

Offline AntonyMMM

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Re: Migration within UK 1780s
« Reply #9 on: Monday 19 June 17 22:42 BST (UK) »
My next question would have been about religion.

The County of Lancashire and especially this area between Preston and Blackburn had a large Catholic population. There are registers for some Catholic chapels in the area but few (if any) go back further than 1780 for the reasons you state. Transcripts of the registers are most easily available in the publications of the the Catholic Record Society.

I know St Peter & St Paul's church very well - my children were baptised there some years ago (by Fr Horgan - named as a contributor on the document you link to).



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Offline Rena

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Re: Migration within UK 1780s
« Reply #10 on: Monday 19 June 17 22:53 BST (UK) »
There are a couple of trades that link Swaledale and Ribchester that could explain why your ancestors moved.

The first could be linked to working or mining metals because there was a lead mine in Swaledale and also near Ribchester, additionally there was iron and coal mining in the Ribchester area.

The second occupation could be weaving, or allied to weaving such as being a nailer (fashioning metal nails) etc.  Up in Yorkshire there was weaving wool and down in Lancashire there was weaving cotton. As the Yorkshire Dales were (and are) sparsely populated, I should imagine there was more money to be earned further south.

It seems to me that as the fortunes of Ribchester declined he moved to Blackburn which prospered especially when the Leeds Liverpool canal arrived.

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Offline Nifty1

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Re: Migration within UK 1780s
« Reply #11 on: Tuesday 20 June 17 09:31 BST (UK) »
I'd be looking for the connection that made them make that particular journey - it seems unlikely to be a random destination, I would expect some sort of family (or other) link.

I think that a main driver of migration could be termed in human terms as opportunity and Progress. Particularly technology and agriculture. As sail gave way to steam this created a need for coal which created a need for miners which created a need to feed them and so it went on with the development of unions and Human Rights.
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Offline Pennines

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Re: Migration within UK 1780s
« Reply #12 on: Tuesday 20 June 17 09:47 BST (UK) »
Thank you Antony, Rena and Nifty (Nifty - you managed to niftily sneak in a response whilst I was typing mine -- apt username!)

I'm from Blackburn - very close to Ribchester. I have been many times - but have taken it's history for granted (as you tend to do with nearby places).
 I must confess I didn't know there had been mining in the area - and nailing, associated with weaving. It is such a tiny place I suppose I simply associated it with cottage based industries. So your information about this and Swaledale is very interesting Rena.

(I had firstly got hung up on the 'river' aspect with this family - as every place where they had lived in North Yorks was literally on a river - and so was Ribchester. Hence I was trying to do a Miss Marple bit about that. I then realised that most old settlements were formed on rivers and had to put myself in the corner for a while being a dunce!)

(Antony - my Mum, aunt and uncle had a static caravan at Dinckley - just over the bridge from Ribchester and went there most weekends for years.)
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