Author Topic: Canal bridge for improvement please  (Read 224 times)

Offline ainslie

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Canal bridge for improvement please
« on: Saturday 12 August 17 11:34 BST (UK) »
Can any of you clever people enhance the name plate in this cast iron bridge over the Leeds - Liverpool Canal, and straighten it up.  The gongoozlers and surrounding metal are of no interest!  The bridge has been replaced since the shot was taken.
Thank you.

Ainslie

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Online Handypandy

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Re: Canal bridge for improvement please
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 12 August 17 20:59 BST (UK) »
One from me..

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Offline japeflakes

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Re: Canal bridge for improvement please
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 13 August 17 06:49 BST (UK) »
Robert Daglish
St Helens
Lancashire
1869 ?
http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Robert_Daglish_and_Co

Offline japeflakes

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Re: Canal bridge for improvement please
« Reply #3 on: Sunday 13 August 17 07:25 BST (UK) »
could be:
Daglish, Robert (Junior)
The son was born in Wigan on 16 September 1808 and was apprenticed to Rothwell, Hick & Co. of Bolton. In 1830 Robert Daglish Jr joined Lee, Watson & Co, iron founders at St Helens who, in 1832, built an engine and machinery for working the inclines on the St Helens & Runcorn Gap Railway. In 1837-8 he contracted for erection of engines, boilers and machinery for glass manufacture at Birmingham and St Helens. In about 1839 Daglish, with John Smith, undertook to work the traffic on the St Helens & Runcorn Gap Railway and continued to do this until 1848, maintaining locomotives and rolling stock at Sutton shed at St Helens In 1846 he contracted for bridges on the Liverpool & Bury line of the LYR, including two large iron lattice girder bridges near Bolton, the first of their type. In 1849 Robert Daglish Jr & Co built the iron bridges for the Tithebarn Street extension of the LYR at Liverpool. From 1851 Daglish conducted the foundry business alone until 1869 when he took his nephew George H. Daglish into partnership. In 1852 he erected the coal drops at the LNWR docks at Garston on the Mersey. He was a director of the St Helens Canal & Railway Co, 1854-64, and of the LYR, 1876-83.Marshall. Lowe Supplement states that St Helens Railway & Canal Co. locomotives Nos 13 Forth (four coupled of 1852) and No. 12 Saracen (six coupled of 1858) were constructed at the St Helens Foundry as well as other locomotives for industrial railways. Robert Junior married three times: in 1834 to Harriet Speakman, who died in 1836; in 1840 to Ellen Robinson who died in 1867; and in 1867 to Ellen Worrall who outlived him, dying in 1901. There were no children to any of these marriages.  It was this Robert who was chiefly concerned with the success of the St Helens Foundry. Robert junior died in London on 6 May 1883.[source Richard Daglish in 2012]

Offline ainslie

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Re: Canal bridge for improvement please
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 13 August 17 07:52 BST (UK) »
Thank you both, very much.  The close-up is exactly what I hoped for and the information about the foundry is also correct.
There are not many relics left of what was once a thriving business which closed down in the 1930s.

Ainslie