Author Topic: Does 'rove' only mean 'scab' in Suffolk?  (Read 627 times)

Offline essexpoet

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Re: Does 'rove' only mean 'scab' in Suffolk?
« Reply #9 on: Monday 11 September 17 08:56 BST (UK) »
It is not in the list of Suffolk /Essex words and phrases on the foxearth.org.uk website.

It sounds the sort of word that would be said in the lovely soft accent provailing around the Beccles to Lowestoft area, especially if pronounced roove.

Mike
Halstead ,The Hedinghams,The Maplesteads,The Belchamps,Gosfield,Gestingthorpe,Stisted,Toppesfield

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Offline Bob briscoe

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Re: Does 'rove' only mean 'scab' in Suffolk?
« Reply #10 on: Monday 11 September 17 09:11 BST (UK) »
To be a little more scientific about this, of the 6 of us who are holidaying together at the mo, the 3 who were brought up on rove were born around the late 1950s / early 1960s and our parents were respectively from Framlingham, Leiston and the Nacton/Gainsborough area of Ipswich.

The parents of the 3 who have never heard of it are from South Essex, Cornwall and Stoke.

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Offline Greensleeves

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Re: Does 'rove' only mean 'scab' in Suffolk?
« Reply #11 on: Monday 11 September 17 15:06 BST (UK) »
Whilst I was born in Ipswich, I didn't live there until the 1960s.  My mother came from Brettenham, Suffolk and none of my relations on her side of the family ever used the word 'rove', although they did know what it meant, I'm sure.  However, nearly all the people I became friends with in my teenage years, who were born in the Nacton/Gainsborough area of Ipswich,  did use that word - which seems to coincide neatly with what you say, Bob.  I lived all over the UK as a child (my father was in the RAF) and I never heard it used anywhere else.
Suffolk: Pearl(e),  Garnham, Southgate, Blo(o)mfield, Laws, Josselyn/Josslyn/Josling/Gosling
Durham/Yorkshire: Sedgwick/Sidgwick, Shadforth, Thompson, Rudd, Mattingley
Ireland: Davis
Norway: Torreson/Torsen/Torrison
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Offline sharonmx5

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Re: Does 'rove' only mean 'scab' in Suffolk?
« Reply #12 on: Friday 15 September 17 18:36 BST (UK) »
My parents came from different sides of Ipswich and we always used the word rove without exception.  Often used in our house after playing out in the street in dresses and shorts, our knees were always covered in them!
Hudson - Ipswich, pre 1800; Devall - Colchester, pre 1780

Offline Borley Manor

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Re: Does 'rove' only mean 'scab' in Suffolk?
« Reply #13 on: Thursday 12 October 17 18:01 BST (UK) »
I came from Ipswich, 1951, and I thought it was a national word for scab, I have always used it in that context, little knowing it was quite possibly a local word..... My mum often said "Stop picking that rove, it will get poisonous".
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Harker  (Cumbria)