Author Topic: Careys of Rathkeale 1880s  (Read 1574 times)

Offline T4Tim

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Re: Careys of Rathkeale 1880s
« Reply #99 on: Wednesday 06 December 17 13:40 GMT (UK) »
Another small bit, from the Curator of Cork Public Museum, in reply to my query of 20 Georges St, Cork;
"I did some research on your enquiry and looked at the 1875/76 Guys Cork Almanac, which details the people and businesses and their addresses in the city at the time.
 
http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/places/streetandtradedirectories/1875-6guyscountycity/
 
There are also other directories available from the Cork Past and Present website so you can trace the movement of the family from the 19th to 20th century. There are also the online census records for 1901 and 1911 that can also be searched on line.
 
Anyway, back to the 1875/76 Directory and your Great Grandfather Robert McGuiness is listed on page 557 and his profession is given as a  vintner (a maker or seller of wine) and he lived at No 23 George’s Street, not no. 20.
 
After the re-naming of the Georges Street to Oliver Plunkett, it is most likely that the numbering remained the same."

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Offline myluck!

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Re: Careys of Rathkeale 1880s
« Reply #100 on: Thursday 07 December 17 10:45 GMT (UK) »
As Katherine Keenan's parents were involved with army catering (her father described as a mess man and her mother as a caterer) and then Katherine herself I wonder did she meet Robert in obtaining supplies? and he catered to their alcohol need!

It is interesting that the death record of Charles Frederick McGUINNESS d. Mar 27 1883 has Robert's address as "Curragh Camp" which was the army camp rather than any other more general description - also Charles is described as "Gentleman's child" which gives some status to Robert.  It makes no reference to being any army rank or officer.
Kearney & Bourke/ Johns & Fox/ Mannion & Finan/ Donohoe & Curley
Byrne [Carthy], Keeffe/ Germaine, Butler/ McDermott, Giblin/ Lally, Dolan
Toole, Doran; Dowling, Grogan/ Reilly, Burke; Warren, Kidd [Lawless]/ Smith, Scally; Mangan, Rodgers/ Fahy, Calday; Staunton, Miller
Further generations:
Brophy Coleman Eathorn(e) Fahy Fitzpatrick Geraghty Haverty Keane Keogh Nowlan Rowe Walder

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Offline T4Tim

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Re: Careys of Rathkeale 1880s
« Reply #101 on: Thursday 07 December 17 14:04 GMT (UK) »
There have been just enough discrepancies, contradiction and corrections on record, I wonder if folks sometimes just gave convenient answers, when asked.

I would not have thought Ireland to be grape friendly. 

Offline myluck!

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Re: Careys of Rathkeale 1880s
« Reply #102 on: Thursday 07 December 17 14:10 GMT (UK) »
We are and were very grape friendly!!

In Victorian Ireland the upper classes mainly drank the most wine with documented invoices and descriptions available

from a 2012 article by Susan Boyle in the Journal LINK

Ireland had a sophisticated monastic education system.  Monks were schooled aspects of farming and crop cultivation along side scripture and penmanship. Many of them travelled to Europe and established vineyards. Some of the most successful even ended up as wine saints! St Fiachra is the patron saint of gardeners, a skill honed in the vineyards of France. The wine growing region named after him is the most densely planted commune in the country.  St Killian planted vineyards in the Main Valley in Germany where he is the patron saint of winegrowers. St Fridolin is the patron St of Alsace and established the wine industry in Switzerland.

Ancient Ireland was awash with wine: Irish people were making wine in other parts of Europe and shipping it back home.  But, the golden age of Ireland and wine was yet to come!

In the 17th century a Dutch engineer drained much of the swampy land in Bordeaux, revealing some of the most perfect wine growing terroir in the world. At the same time, members of more than 200 Irish families, fleeing political turmoil in Ireland, settled in Bordeaux and transformed the wine industry. These people are known as the ‘Wine Geese’. In Bordeaux their legacy is; fourteen chateaux, ten streets, two wine communes and one public monument bearing Irish names. These Bordeaux wines have influenced wine making across the globe.

Moreover, it’s a pretty safe bet that wherever wine is being made, there’s an Irish hand in it.  An Irish man wrote the first account of vines and wine making in North America. There are Irish winemakers in Australia, South Africa, and South America.


editted to add - another LINK with some more details!!
Kearney & Bourke/ Johns & Fox/ Mannion & Finan/ Donohoe & Curley
Byrne [Carthy], Keeffe/ Germaine, Butler/ McDermott, Giblin/ Lally, Dolan
Toole, Doran; Dowling, Grogan/ Reilly, Burke; Warren, Kidd [Lawless]/ Smith, Scally; Mangan, Rodgers/ Fahy, Calday; Staunton, Miller
Further generations:
Brophy Coleman Eathorn(e) Fahy Fitzpatrick Geraghty Haverty Keane Keogh Nowlan Rowe Walder