Author Topic: DNA - When is a father a father?  (Read 1014 times)

Offline bugbear

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Re: DNA - When is a father a father?
« Reply #9 on: Thursday 30 November 17 16:48 GMT (UK) »
This is something close to my heart and a sensitive subject, but I thought it is worthy of discussion and thought. Therefore I have written a blog regarding the subject.

When is a Father a Father? https://chiddicksfamilytree.wordpress.com/2017/11/26/when-is-a-father-a-father
I think the term is very well defined, in the context of genealogy. If you want to choose a different context, that's fine too.

 BugBear
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WOMACK Norfolk/Suffolk

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Offline chiddicks

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Re: DNA - When is a father a father?
« Reply #10 on: Monday 04 December 17 08:46 GMT (UK) »
How we document the modern extended and diverse modern families of today, for future generations will be a difficult one!

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Offline bugbear

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Re: DNA - When is a father a father?
« Reply #11 on: Monday 04 December 17 09:22 GMT (UK) »
How we document the modern extended and diverse modern families of today, for future generations will be a difficult one!
Not genealogically (although science may change that soon). Yes, socially.

 BugBear
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Offline mike175

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Re: DNA - When is a father a father?
« Reply #12 on: Monday 04 December 17 10:03 GMT (UK) »
Guy makes some good points. Being of similar age I also find it easy to imagine the lives of my grandparents and great grandparents because there are common points of reference. I think it will be much harder for future generations to relate to their ancestors, although it probably won't be long before 'virtual reality' can give them the 'experience'. In the future most experiences will most likely be 'virtual' anyway  :-\

Some years ago I was researching an ancestor, born in the 1700s, when it suddenly struck me that he would not have had electric or gas lighting, probably drew water from a pump in the street, no railways, etc. I know these are obvious points that we are all conscious of in an abstract way but somehow at that moment it became real and personal and I began to think of my ancestors in a different way. Some of the better costume dramas and historic documentaries on TV can give insights into the way of life of our ancestors. In attempting to write a book of my family history I try to include references to known historical events as they might have affected my ancestors at the time.

Apologies for drifting off topic
  :-[

Mike.
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Offline JACK GEE

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Re: DNA - When is a father a father?
« Reply #13 on: Monday 04 December 17 11:30 GMT (UK) »
Working the generation thread -
My parents were a product of the Depression of the 1930's and as such raised  our family frugally.  My genie journey also makes me think about the  each of the generations and how they lived.

cheers
Jack Gee
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Offline chiddicks

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Re: DNA - When is a father a father?
« Reply #14 on: Thursday 07 December 17 16:45 GMT (UK) »
We are all a product of our genes but also our family life and the values and beliefs that are installed in us as children are the characteristics that stand us in good stead today.

To use that quote:

Our character is what we do when we think no one is looking.

Online Lisajb

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Re: DNA - When is a father a father?
« Reply #15 on: Thursday 07 December 17 18:32 GMT (UK) »
My husband has never known who his father is. His mother always maintained that she got drunk at a party and didn't know who it was.

However fast forward a few years and her husband was under the care of a consultant at a local hospital. She was at our house a day or so later and announced "Oh, I saw your father while I was at the hospital with D (her husband). I would have known him anywhere."

Fast forward a few years more, and my husband has developed a few medical conditions. When he's told his mum, she's said, oh yes, I've had that for a while.

It frightens me that there may be something inheritable from his father that we will never know about and can't warn our children about. As it stands, they both have a double whammy of diabetes from both of us that they're at risk from.

Sadly, my mother in law doesn't have long to live. My other halfs only option, should he decide to, is going to be spit in a tube.
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